Make Real Brown Sugar at Home at half the price

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posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 04:42 PM
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This has probably been threaded, but...
If you have a kitchen aid or mix master (or heaven forbid by hand with a bowl and wooden spoon)
Take 2 cups of sugar and drizzle in a teaspoon of molasses as you mix, more if you like it darker.
Let it mix on slow until it is completely mixed through and voila, store bought brown sugar at half the price.

Store it in an airtight container. If it dries out, stick a piece of bread in to re hydrate it in a day or to.

Sell it to your friends and neighbors, LOL make money, become the sugar king or queen.

Or just retire off the money you will save.




posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 04:55 PM
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Great idea...thank you.

But "retire off the money you save".....how much sugar do you eat???



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 05:35 PM
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Originally posted by winterkill
This has probably been threaded, but...
If you have a kitchen aid or mix master (or heaven forbid by hand with a bowl and wooden spoon)
Take 2 cups of sugar and drizzle in a teaspoon of molasses as you mix, more if you like it darker.
Let it mix on slow until it is completely mixed through and voila, store bought brown sugar at half the price.

Store it in an airtight container. If it dries out, stick a piece of bread in to re hydrate it in a day or to.

Sell it to your friends and neighbors, LOL make money, become the sugar king or queen.

Or just retire off the money you will save.


That's not real brown sugar. However, you do have a future in the corporate food business.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 05:39 PM
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I don't get it.

Processed sugar mixed with the left overs from making the processed sugar.

I don't think that makes the same thing as raw sugar. It still has been put through the bleaching process. (this is the part I thought people disliked)

Might look like it, but I think the processed sugar is still in there.



I really wish I'd taken up bee keeping when I was younger. I just hate bees so much. buggers hate me back too!



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by winofiend
 



My thoughts exactly.
I use organic pure cane sugar and try my best to avoid white/store brand sugar as much as possible.
Definitely not the same thing as brown sugar, she's pulling here.
Raw sugar is probably the better way to go, but I like the taste of the organic cane

edit on 6-2-2013 by RooskiZombi because: (no reason given)
edit on 6-2-2013 by RooskiZombi because: (no reason given)



Ok, after reading online it seems most brown sugars ARE molasses added into it. I did not know this. Raw sugar from this point on
edit on 6-2-2013 by RooskiZombi because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 06:22 PM
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Gross!

why reward corporate capitalism two times over, by buying the processed sugar (linked to obesity, diabetes)

then also buy the by-products and serve yourself food that has no nutritient value (besides empty calories)??



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 07:57 PM
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Originally posted by tropic
Gross!

why reward corporate capitalism two times over, by buying the processed sugar (linked to obesity, diabetes)

then also buy the by-products and serve yourself food that has no nutritient value (besides empty calories)??


Duh, cheaper!

Our Mexican sugar is brownish and less refined. I think better for that reason.



posted on Feb, 7 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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Just so everyone knows, brown sugar is made by the corps by taking white sugar and putting molasses in it just as I described. Then they double the price.

en.wikipedia.org...



it is produced by the addition of molasses to refined white sugar (so-called Molasses Sugar). Brown sugar contains from 3.5% molasses (light brown sugar) to 6.5% molasses (dark brown sugar) based on total volume. Based on total weight, regular brown sugar contains up to 10% molasses.[1] The product is naturally moist from the hygroscopic nature of the molasses and is often labelled as "soft." The product may undergo processing to give a product that flows better for industrial handling. The addition of dyes and/or other chemicals may be permitted in some areas or for industrial products.





Brown sugar is often produced by adding cane molasses to completely refined white sugar crystals to more carefully control the ratio of molasses to sugar crystals and to reduce manufacturing costs.[2] This also allows the production of brown sugars to be based predominantly on beet sugar. Brown sugar prepared in this manner is often much coarser than its unrefined equivalent and its molasses may be easily separated from the crystals by simply washing to reveal the underlying white sugar crystals; with unrefined brown, inclusion of molasses within the crystal will appear off-white if washed. The molasses usually used for food is obtained from sugar cane, because the flavor is generally preferred over beet sugar molasses, although in some areas, especially in Belgium and the Netherlands, sugar beet molasses is used. The white sugar used can be from either beet or cane, as the chemical composition, nutritional value, colour, and taste of fully refined white sugar is for practical purposes the same, no matter from what plant it originates. Even with less-than-perfect refining, the small differences in colour, odor, and taste of the white sugar will be masked by the molasses.


Now that ya'll know. go make some and save money



posted on Feb, 7 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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I use 3 tablespoons of molasses per 2 cups of sugar. It's great on oatmeal, and nobody can understand why my chocolate chip cookies are better than anybody else's.



posted on Feb, 7 2013 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by winterkill
 


Just so you know that is still not real brown sugar. Just more processed crap. Have that really gotten you believe that the processed crap is real? Just because it is labeled brown sugar?




After harvesting of sugar cane, raw or brown sugar is made as follows: Extraction.The cane is crushed in a series of large roller mills: similar to a mangle [wringer]. Evaporation. The juice is cleaned with slaked lime which settles out a lot of the dirt so that it can be sent back to the fields. Once this is done, the juice is thickened up into a syrup by boiling off the water using steam in a process called evaporation. Boiling.The syrup is placed into a very large pan for boiling, the last stage. In the pan even more water is boiled off until conditions are right for sugar crystals to grow. In the factory the workers usually have to throw in some sugar dust to initiate crystal formation. Once the crystals have grown the resulting mixture of crystals and mother liquor is spun in centrifuges to separate the two, rather like washing is spin dried. The crystals are then given a final dry with hot air before being stored. The resulting sugar in the above mentioned procedures can be sold as brown sugar or can be further processed to partially refined sugar (segunda) or fully refined sugar (white sugar). Sometimes manufacturers add back the molasses (by product of sugar production) to white sugar to produce brown sugar. Now, the question is – Are you getting the real brown sugar?


Real Brown Sugar





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