8,830,026: Americans on Disability Hits New Record for 192nd Straight Month

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posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by 200Plus
 


Good point. Depending on whether a claimed disability is "service related" or incurred during "combat" seems to be the major criteria for VA relief. I didn't know the DoD had another program. BTW, I receive a small DoD pension that basically covers the taxes I have to pay on my SSDI benefits.

ganjoa




posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:33 PM
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Why is this surprising? The American population is rapidly aging. Even now there are more workers over the age of 55 than younger workers. There are a lot of old people and thus there are a lot more candidates for disability.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:34 PM
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Just so we are all clear on the actual requirements for disability, it is not necessarily referring to a permanent situation though it does include that.

Essentially, what they look for is something that limits ones ability to do work, and is expected to last at least one year up to and including death.

www.ssa.gov...



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:35 PM
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reply to post by TheNewRevolution
 


I know quite a few too, for as another person said, depression, anxiety one for being overweight,

I am all those thing but I still work.

Then there are the drug addicts and alcoholics, at one time I believe they put kids with add on it.

I know a X heroin addict that is so far gone he is on disability.

oh well, I have lost hope, I can't even feel outrage anymore.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:37 PM
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Originally posted by antonia
Why is this surprising? The American population is rapidly aging. Even now there are more workers over the age of 55 than younger workers. There are a lot of old people and thus there are a lot more candidates for disability.


And there are a lot of older people that can't afford to retire, my husband said he will have to work till he dies, and knowing him he will, he is a 63 year old carpenter.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:38 PM
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What gets,me is everyone gets all pissy about ''entitlement programs'' , and for the most part, noone bitches and moans about the BILLIONS being sent for foreign aid to various countries around the world. Even fv@&ing Russia! Sure, there's a percentage that abuse disability, but most people on it, need it. Some people have paid into this system, and will never see a dime of their monies contributed. Instead of blaming people trying to live off of chump change, blame the corrupted and incompetent gov. Yep, tptb have most people just where they want them...the slaves will massacre each other over table scraps. Everyone is trying to survive in this doomed economy



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:41 PM
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Originally posted by antonia
Why is this surprising? The American population is rapidly aging. Even now there are more workers over the age of 55 than younger workers. There are a lot of old people and thus there are a lot more candidates for disability.


People who are 61 years and 9 months of age are more likely to apply for Social Security Retirement rather than Social Security Disability. Obviously, "retirement" is becoming less and less likely for many.

Though, depending on the specific situation, one might go through where the other does not. There is so much.. strangeness within the system that it usually has to be assessed on an individual basis as generalizations in such an inconsistent organization are hard to make.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by poloblack
 





bitches and moans about the BILLIONS being sent for foreign aid to various countries around the world.


I certainly do, but I also think the amount of people abusing the system is unfair to the rest of the population and those disabled that really need a disability check.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:44 PM
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I know sometimes it takes years to get a disability check, so I can't understand how some can go straight from unemployment to social security disability, plus how do they live on it?



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:55 PM
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I'm currently considered at 50% disabled. I actually argued against it but the VA said that my problems will worsen as I age. Unfortunately, they did and I had to quit my job last week because of a back problem (which the VA denied).

But I still don't qualify for SSI, and to be truthful, don't want it. I have a pension already and my VA disability and I feel guilty about that. I want to contribute, not leech.

But there are a lot of people out there who are leeches and frankly, they piss me off. But I know people who do need disability as they cannot do much. A buddy of mine is on a walker at the age of 60 and cannot do much. Sitting to long hurts him and standing to long is the same. Some people do need it.

However some do not.

I know that I have worked hard to recieve my pension, and have damaged myself in the process, but it still feels wrong. My mind is willing, but my body can no longer comply.

This sucks!
edit on 6-2-2013 by TDawgRex because: Time for a beer to calm down.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:57 PM
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Originally posted by ganjoa

Originally posted by jibeho
reply to post by ganjoa
 


The whole point of disability benefits is to get people back to work and healthy who be came disabled while working. It was never intended to be a lifetime disbursement for the majority who collect it. Yes there are exceptions.


That is NOT the way the current SSDI system works - in order to collect disability benefits, you have to be permanently disabled according to their (SSA) criteria. There are some supplementary subsistence benefits (SSI) that may be temporary, but the qualifications and situations are completely different than "disability benefits". There aren't any real "programs" to help you get back to work once you've gone through the process to receive SSDI benefits - they have a "work credit" program that let's you make a bit of money without affecting your benefits, but it is insubstantial at best.

ganjoa


Thanks for the information!!

So basically the system is designed to keep people on the govt. tit. Many conditions are recoverable for those who wish to recover and go back to work. Once your in you're in... No assessments or reevaluations or means testing? Amazing...



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by TDawgRex
 





My mind is willing, but my body can no longer comply.


Oh man I know that feeling, still young at heart, but the body wont cooperate.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 03:02 PM
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Originally posted by Serdgiam


It is extremely frustrating to me that people are even considered for disability with things like anxiety and depression, much less accepted!



I can understand your frustration's regarding your own situation...and I can understand your frustration's if you are talking about those who "play" on anxiety and depression....

But if you believe that no-one who suffers from anxiety and/or depression should be considered for disability then you obviously have no experience of the hugely debilitating effects either can have on a person's day to day living and ability to function.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 03:08 PM
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I've been doing a little research on the topic and was amazed at how many "agencies" are out there to help people through the process to collect disability. For a fee of course...

I lost my sense of smell 20 years ago as a result of a head injury and surgery to repair my bean. Perhaps I'm missing my share of the pie. It has limited my career options.... you'd be amazed how smell comes into play in certain fields... My main concern is that I cannot smell smoke, or gas (all kinds
) and am always paranoid when my wife burns candles or lights a fire in the fireplace etc



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 03:16 PM
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Originally posted by Logos23
But if you believe that no-one who suffers from anxiety and/or depression should be considered for disability then you obviously have no experience of the hugely debilitating effects either can have on a person's day to day living and ability to function.


Your assumption is incorrect. I am intimately familiar with depression. I also have a family history of anxiety (everything from OCD to war-induced PTSD to agoraphobia). Though, I have not had issues with anxiety myself.

I will concede that things like PTSD can make it mentally difficult to carry on day to day, though it is still entirely possible. On "good days," they function just like everyone else. Especially with everything from counseling to drugs to natural remedies. It can also be mitigated by doing different things like running an online business from home, designing websites, etc. That possibility is non-existent for me, or those with similar injuries. There are no good days where I would be able to even physically stand for more than 10 minutes. It is a battle to get to the bathroom in time.

You will struggle greatly to convince me that depression, specifically, is grounds for disability.
edit on 6-2-2013 by Serdgiam because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 03:25 PM
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Originally posted by burdman30ott6
Sounds like a sure fire recipe for being depressed to me. (HINT HINT HINT)


I no longer have a major beef with folks who are gaming the system. I hope these number reach not just an unsustainable level, but a critical level, in fact. The faster the government accounts are driven to total insolvency, the fast we are forced to start over, and the brighter the future becomes.


Missed your reply, apologies!

Perhaps you have a point. It seems that my likelihood of being accepted would increase exponentially if I claimed some sort of mental illness.

Obviously, my current state is considered much more capable of work than someone with depression or anxiety. Though, I am unsure if having that in such an "official" record may limit my ability to own a firearm in the future.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by Serdgiam
 



Well on my statement that you must not have experience of depression and / or anxiety I stand corrected.....

But with any illness there are varying degrees of symptoms and how it impact's someone's life...my experience's are not the same as yours.

Not everyone who suffers from PTSD or depression or anxiety related disorders have "good day's" as you suggested. I am not trying to convince you of anything...just merely pointing out that this is an issue which isn't so " black and white" and we can't asses everyone with the same yard brush......



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by Logos23
 


I went to school with a guy who was "normal" in every sense of the word. Then he started to act strangely. He was prone to panic attacks. They grew so bad that he could not find a job anymore. Needless to say, they put him an medication and that did seem to calm him down.

During his lucid moments (which is most of the time now) he is at a lost as to why this has happened to him. He never served in the military, had a stable home life and a good circle of friends. It just happens sometimes.

I have no problems paying taxes to help him.

Then again, I have served with a Soldier who rarely went outside the wire and declared PTSD upon redeployment. This Soldier was never involved in direct combat but is now recieving 80% disability. And is bragging about it. I contacted the VA regarding this fraud and was basically told to mind my own business.

I have problems paying my taxes to this individual.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by Logos23
reply to post by Serdgiam
 



Well on my statement that you must not have experience of depression and / or anxiety I stand corrected.....

But with any illness there are varying degrees of symptoms and how it impact's someone's life...my experience's are not the same as yours.


Agreed, there is even the distinct possibility that what my family members have faced is far worse than anything you have witnessed.


Not everyone who suffers from PTSD or depression or anxiety related disorders have "good day's" as you suggested. I am not trying to convince you of anything...just merely pointing out that this is an issue which isn't so " black and white" and we can't asses everyone with the same yard brush......


One of my family members has a constant battle with anxiety related problems. They are not able to leave the home without having a severe panic attack which usually results in them losing consciousness and sometimes even resulting in hospitalization. Even going room to room within their home can bring it on. While their condition has continued to worsen over the decades, they are still able to work. They had to put more thought into it than most, since there are much more obvious restrictions on what they can do. It took them a lot of effort to be able to figure out exactly how to maintain an income. Literally years. This person has been a massive inspiration to me personally, but thats another story.

Now, if we are talking about something like Alzheimer's, then I would definitely agree with you.

I am perfectly fine with agreeing to disagree and admit that there are exceptions to every rule.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 04:11 PM
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Originally posted by Serdgiam

It took them a lot of effort to be able to figure out exactly how to maintain an income. Literally years.



So if there is no system to recognise the debilitating effects of anxiety related disorders on some individuals, then who supports them financially during the long or short term they are unable to support themselves during their quest to get to grips with their condition as your family member did after many year's?

I don't wish to try and score points about my experience's..I am not an expert on anyone else's experiences...but I am an expert on my own...and I still stand by any of my prior comments.

As you say one can agree to disagree...I can live with that






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