Behavior expert or veterinarian?

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posted on Feb, 5 2013 @ 12:18 PM
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Hello everyone! I need some help. I've been considering going back to school for a while now to either become a Behavior Expert or Veterinarian.

As a child, my only dream was to become a veterinarian. Unlike a lot of children, my first pet (I took care of him) was when I was 4 years old and was a 9 year old Maincoon mix cat (He was my best friend for over 10 years and had to be put down because of cancer.
). Growing up, all I ever wanted was to help animals. I volunteered at a no-kill shelter for around 6 years while I was in middle school, I found and rescued many strays and dogs that had gotten out of their owners back yards, and every animal I have currently (3 dogs and a cat) are all rescues. Heck, when growing up, people would bring their dogs or cats to me to see if I could find out what was wrong (why they were throwing up, if their leg was broken, etc.) We realized I definitely wasn't qualified to diagnose their animal's ailments, but for the most part I could deduce what was wrong and let them know if they should take their animal in or just keep an eye on it. To this day my family members still ask me if I know what's going on with our animals instead of taking them in for simple little stuff.

I remember watching those old Vet shows on Animal Planet growing up and finding what they did incredible. But then I started getting into the behaviors of animals; particularly dogs and why they act the way they do. I began to do research on the reasons my dog would act a certain way towards others, when we were playing, while we were on walks, etc. I began to fall in love with the aspect of helping other people learn about what their dogs behavior means and ways to change that behavior to make their home a better one. Basically, I want to do what Victoria Stilwell (It's Me Or The Dog) does for a living.

My question to you, ATS, is what do you think I should become? I love both career fields equally as much, and I just can't decide on what to do. What are your thoughts?




posted on Feb, 5 2013 @ 12:24 PM
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Can't you do both?
What I mean is, becoming a vet also includes animal behavior study as well doesn't it? You could be a vet, that also offers classes and what not.

How wonderful of you to be so caring of animals!
I wish you the best of luck.

(And wish you would come to our area when your done!
)



posted on Feb, 5 2013 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by chiefsmom
 


I could, but ideally I would rather do one than both. While veterinarians do work with animals behaviors, becoming a vet or behavior expert are two very different things. A behavior expert helps others know why their animal destroys their shoes when they're gone, why they piddle in the house, why they growl with their food bowl, etc. where as a veterinarian tells people why their animal is throwing up, does regular health checks, fixes broken legs, etc.

Thanks for the well wishes! Animals are just like furry, for legged people that can't talk for themselves. It always helps for someone to be able to speak for them.
edit on 5/2/2013 by Dondylion because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 5 2013 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by Dondylion
 


Well then honestly, in this day and age, I would go with becoming a vet.
Because lets face it, more people will actually take their dog to the vet when it's ill, and just search on the internet to find out why a dog behaves the way it does. So for your financial stability, that's what I'd do.



posted on Feb, 5 2013 @ 12:42 PM
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Originally posted by chiefsmom
reply to post by Dondylion
 


Well then honestly, in this day and age, I would go with becoming a vet.
Because lets face it, more people will actually take their dog to the vet when it's ill, and just search on the internet to find out why a dog behaves the way it does. So for your financial stability, that's what I'd do.



That's the thing. Sometimes, it's more than just knowing why a dog is growling when near it's food bowl. Being a behavior expert means going to peoples houses and actually changing said behavior to make their home a better place for both human and dog.

I do understand what you are saying, though. But, the same could be said about why their dog is ill. Most people nowadays just go onto WebMD or the like for why they are ill, so they could do something similar for their animals. People are lazy
. And for me, it isn't about the money. I'm fine in that aspect. I'm also a licensed Massage Therapist which can pay $60+ per hour plus tips when working from home, so financial stability isn't an issue.

The reason I would be going into either one of these professions is completely for the animals themselves and to get them and their owners the help they need. The more educated people are when it comes to their animals, a better place it will become for us together.
edit on 5/2/2013 by Dondylion because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 5 2013 @ 01:43 PM
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Originally posted by chiefsmom
reply to post by Dondylion
 


Well then honestly, in this day and age, I would go with becoming a vet.
Because lets face it, more people will actually take their dog to the vet when it's ill, and just search on the internet to find out why a dog behaves the way it does. So for your financial stability, that's what I'd do.



Chiefsmom is spot on. Plus, Obamacare won't mess with Vets, like it does with Human Doctors. Vets will always be in demand...people a lot of the time, take better care of their pets than Human Family members....



Owners are taking care of their pets, said Dr. Jessica Vogelsang, a San Diego veterinarian and author of pawcurious.com. "They are planning ahead. When they go on vacation, they want to make sure their pets are well cared for," she said.

Spending in 2011 was up 5.3 percent from 2010, when it totaled $48.35 billion, Vetere said. He estimated 2012 sales would total $53 billion.

In 2011, people spent $19.85 billion on food, $13.41 billion on vet care, $11.77 billion on supplies and over-the-counter medicines, $3.79 billion on other services and $2.14 billion on live animal purchases
cnsnews.com...


Des



posted on Feb, 5 2013 @ 01:55 PM
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You may want to try the path of Pre-Veterinary Medicine education where you will learn animal sciences and behavior with that you can apply it to a career in animal behavior if you choose. If you're doing well, enjoy the college, financially set, grades that they require, have first hand Veterinary experience, etc., from there decide on if you want to become a Veterinarian.

The field is competitive plus as the old saying goes some in the Veterinary medical field last only about 4 to 5 years due to a burn out, which includes the sadder aspect of the career-treating animal abuse victims as well as procedures you may not be comfortable handling.
Veterinarians don't necessarily make a 'ton of money'. Much of the clinical revenue pays for the medical equipment and procedures. Sales of prescription pet foods and lobby merchandise is pocket revenue. Of course others factors count, location of the Veterinary clinic, competition, type of services, etc.

I believe the pros outweigh the cons, for animal welfare to human as well.
edit on 5-2-2013 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)






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