feb 15th i,ll be watching

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posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 08:27 PM
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I have a serious question about 2012DA14. I understand that it is coming so close it will pass between Earth and its geosynchronous satellites, but will not hit us. Is there no way that the gravity of Earth will pull this object in, even though we pull in many other size satellites,(ie, ISS, Hubble, IRAS, most satellites), or will it not pull this object in because the govt says no so gravity shuts off for those split seconds that it passes?




posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by Ironclad
reply to post by sparky31
 


Feb 15... You'll be watching.

Feb 15 I won't be watching, because I'll be doing something more productive like fighting wildfires in the West Australian outback and saving lives..

You know, the things that actually matter instead of daydreaming aboutt the end of the world..
edit on 2/6/2013 by Ironclad because: (no reason given)
thats your prerogative but living in scotland i doubt i,ll see wildfires,mite have plenty if the asteroid hit us.....u save ur lives in the wildfires and we,ll stick to saving lives in the mountains.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 08:49 PM
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reply to post by illuminatedobserver
 



Da-14 is slated to pass 34,000km from Earth. It will be affected by Earth's gravity like all objects even further than the moon is(P.356,700 km - A.406,300 km). How ever, there will be a number of forces acting on DA-14. Earth's gravity, the moons gravity, as well as the forward momentum of DA-14. 2012 DA-14's trajectory will be changed after it's close path with the Earth, how ever it will not come close enough to be " sucked in" at it's current velocity.

Yes, there is a matter of concern with Geosynchronous satellites, but those in " High " orbit. From wiki it states a geostationary, GSO is approximately 35,786 km from Earths surface. So DA-14 could come into the "danger zone for a few high altitude GSO objects. How ever at this time it is not known, if it will be an immediate threat.

The ISS only orbits at an altitude of 330- 410km from the Earth's surface, so it is incredibly far from harm. The ISS is close enough, it has to correct it's orbit to prevent it from falling to earth. How ever, satellites in a stable GSO, do very little to maintain their course, as gravity acts on them causing the orbit rather than a collision with earth.

Did any of this clear anything up for you?



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 08:52 PM
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reply to post by sparky31
 


2012 DA-14 is not going to hit you. I admire your spirit, but this isn't the fly that needs swatting mate. If it makes you feel better to stare up at the sky looking for something you will not see, go right ahead. Just make sure you get that neck a good rub for ISON's show late fall/winter.

Cheers



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 09:10 PM
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Originally posted by Hijinx
reply to post by sparky31
 


2012 DA-14 is not going to hit you. I admire your spirit, but this isn't the fly that needs swatting mate. If it makes you feel better to stare up at the sky looking for something you will not see, go right ahead. Just make sure you get that neck a good rub for ISON's show late fall/winter.

Cheers
girlfriends keeping it rubbed thanx....looking out for it and hoping its more spectacular than hale bopp in the 90s



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by sparky31
 


I have a real good feeling about ISON, I'm quite excited. Not trying to derail your thread so we will leave it at that. I'm gonna try to convince my misses to let me get a better telescope for it. ( I just want another ha ha.) If it's as spectacular as they say, I won't need the telescope.

If you do manage to see something of DA-14 try to get some pics. It's only 45m, passing fairly high for moderate optics, but if you happen to have a good set up you might be able to see it, if you're lucky. Just don't hold your breath for a fireball, don't need you turning blue.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 10:18 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


Yes it did. Thank you. I knew of all the outside forces acting on it, but i figured with the size of it and distance it could very possibly be sucked in. And no for all those debbie downers out there, im not afraid of this hitting. It doesnt phase me either way. If it does hit, then its a natural thing. We forget the earth acts with every single outside comet, asteroid,ect because it in itself is a massive ecosystem too, we are a part of that puzzle. So by all means, let it come down, if we are lucky it might hit somewhere by maryland and virginia, xD



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 11:04 PM
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Originally posted by benrl

Originally posted by jude11

And then after the date passes, what's next?

What Month, day, reason?

Give it up already. These false prophecies and/or predictions are always proven to be false but then...another pops up.

Whatever happens will happen and it won't be with a bang but a whisper. You want end of civilization prophecies? Look to real World events and stop watching the sky.

Peace


Its not really a prophecy now is it?

Its a real world event... He is suggesting that it could be closer and Nasa would not tell us, so it hits the conspiracy angle.

No more or less possible than say WW3 kicking off because of a situation going down in NK or Syria...


I would also add that huge asteroids HAVE hit this planet before and have caused devastation. We're just such an incredibly young species that we've never seen it. If we continued on for millions or billions of years, we'd eventually experience some kind of devastating earth event.

That being said, I don't really like looking to the skies watching for every possible nightmare out there.



posted on Feb, 7 2013 @ 06:26 AM
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reply to post by thebtheb
 


We've been hit by asteroids, as well as had objects enter our atmosphere in my lifetime. It's inevitable, Earth will get hit at some point by something. There is no use, freaking out over every single one how ever. There hasn't been a significant impact since the tunguska event, and even that shows that when an Asteroid does come in, it's really unlikely a major population center will be hit. Too many of us seem to think Earth is packed to the brim with human beings shoulder to shoulder, that land is the dominant terrain on earth.

Earth is 90% water for one, and the population density for the land that is there is sparse at best. Yes there are areas of the planet that are more populated than others, but an asteroid on a collision course with earth of significant size is a like winning the lottery. It's not that common, but it does happen. For that asteroid to hit somewhere significant is an even greater number. A lot of us get freaked out, when these sorts of things are discussed, but even DA-14 poses little threat if it was to hit earth. it's 45m. Earth, is ENORMOUS compared to it. It's a speck of dust in space next to Earth really. I know no one says it's an ELE Asteroid, but it's not really that dangerous either. I suppose it could be if it were made of iron, came in at the perfect angle of entry to survive our atmosphere.

That's another thing, so many of us take the very air we breath for granted. The total mass of our atmosphere is greater than DA-14. Ever shoot a bullet into water? It's really quite impressive how quick that bullet breaks apart. Many don't make it more than a foot into the water before they have completely broken apart and spent all their energy. This is much the same with many objects entering our atmosphere. Fluid Dynamics applies to Gasses and Liquids alike. DA-14 moving from a near vaccum like space, at enormous speeds into something as dense as our atmosphere poses amazingly catastrophic results. The faster the object is going when it hits the atmosphere, the more potential for " fire works." If DA-14 were significantly larger, I would be #ting my pants if it were on a collision course, but it's a speck of dirt really. Even if it were coming in at a 90degree inclination( best for airburst.) it wouldn't pose serious risk, it would blow up, miles above the surface. The US, British, Russian used to test nukes larger than the potential energy at lower altitudes with out overt effects on the ground. They actually did it to spare spoiling soil, but learned it was no better when it came to the radioactive effects.




posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 09:34 AM
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Originally posted by Tylerknight
reply to post by jude11
 


This isn't a doom and gloom thread, he was merely posting that it is passing close and to keep an eye out because it may hit for all we know! It's not a prophecy or prediction, he was just making a comment on the fact.

I will keep my eyes peeled on it just for the sake of it being better than watching what is going on on this planet!


That asteroid is smaller than a football field.
In order to stir up a lot of fear, then the asteroid needs to 50 MILES in diameter.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


Actually, a small asteroid can do more damage than you might think. It appears that an asteroid of only 1 mile in diameter would be enough to wipe out life on earth. Not from the initial impact but from the resulting environmental impact.

science.howstuffworks.com...



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


It would be bad for whoever it hit, I wouldn't laugh about that.



At 2:26 p.m. EST (1926 GMT) on Feb. 15, the asteroid 2012 DA14 will fly within 17,200 miles (27,680 kilo- meters) of Earth. This is lower than the communications satellites that orbit 22,000 miles (35,800 km) above the equator.

The asteroid will not hit the Earth on this orbital pass, but asteroid 2012 DA14 is about the size of the object that hit Siberia in 1908 (the "Tunguska Event"). The asteroid was discovered on Feb. 23, 2012, by the La Sagra Sky Survey. [Asteroid 2012 DA14 Flyby: Fact vs. Fiction (Video)] At 150 feet wide (49 meters), the asteroid is less than half the length of the International Space Station (356 feet wide, or 109 meters). It is about half the size of a football field.


www.space.com...

And just to correct the previous poster, it is estimated to come within 17,000 miles not 30,000.




edit on 8-2-2013 by timetothink because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 09:49 AM
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The smallest asteroid that can penetrate the atmosphere to or near enough to the ground to cause damage is about 50 meters (150 ft)


www.aura-astronomy.org...



What a coincidence, that is the size of the one we are expecting.



Asteroids with sizes smaller than one kilometer in diameter present a significant hazard. While larger asteroids cause more damage per event, they also occur much less frequently. Somewhere in a size range above 1 km (0.6 miles), impacts cause global environmental effects that can put the entire population of the Earth at risk, even those that are a hemisphere away from the impact site.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 10:04 AM
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Originally posted by timetothink
reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


It would be bad for whoever it hit, I wouldn't laugh about that.



At 2:26 p.m. EST (1926 GMT) on Feb. 15, the asteroid 2012 DA14 will fly within 17,200 miles (27,680 kilo- meters) of Earth. This is lower than the communications satellites that orbit 22,000 miles (35,800 km) above the equator.

The asteroid will not hit the Earth on this orbital pass, but asteroid 2012 DA14 is about the size of the object that hit Siberia in 1908 (the "Tunguska Event"). The asteroid was discovered on Feb. 23, 2012, by the La Sagra Sky Survey. [Asteroid 2012 DA14 Flyby: Fact vs. Fiction (Video)] At 150 feet wide (49 meters), the asteroid is less than half the length of the International Space Station (356 feet wide, or 109 meters). It is about half the size of a football field.


www.space.com...

And just to correct the previous poster, it is estimated to come within 17,000 miles not 30,000.




edit on 8-2-2013 by timetothink because: (no reason given)


It is small and it may burn up in the atmosphere IF it came closer which it will not.
If it was 100% Iron, then it would probably survive the burn and hit the ocean somewhere.

In order to introduce large amounts of fear into the general population, it must be 6 miles wide.

It is smaller than a football field.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by logicalview
reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


Actually, a small asteroid can do more damage than you might think. It appears that an asteroid of only 1 mile in diameter would be enough to wipe out life on earth. Not from the initial impact but from the resulting environmental impact.

science.howstuffworks.com...


1 mile = 5,280 feet

1 Football Field = 300 feet

Nice try.


BTW, don't worry. The advanced ETs would have bumped it and saved us anyway.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


You are very wrong, please read what I and the previous poster linked for you.

edit on 8-2-2013 by timetothink because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 10:13 AM
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reply to post by timetothink
 


You are assuming nothing gets burned up in the atmosphere.
Seek the whole truth.

What's the composition of this killer asteroid of yours?



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 10:13 AM
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reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


This asteroid is 150 ft, enough to survive entering the atmosphere and enough to hurt a lot of people.

Plus it is coming within 17,000miles, our sats are at 20,000.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 10:14 AM
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reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


No one here is saying its an earth killer, we are trying to tell you it could do damage.

It's not just black and white.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 10:16 AM
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reply to post by timetothink
 


What is it made of?

Iron? Nickel? Silicone?

What if the asteroid is made up of 100% magnesium? How much of that killer asteroid
will strike the Earth?

Seek the whole truth.





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