A Common Sense Test.

page: 1
9
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join

posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 03:51 PM
link   
Take six coins, line them up 4 one way, then put 1 on each side of the line of 4 coins. You will have 4 coins lined up one way and 3 coins lined up the other. A cross basically. Now move one coin and make it 4 coins each direction.

Some people get it right away. Very few actually. If you get it,don't give it away until tomorrow please.

It is interesting to note that i have used this little puzzle hundreds of times in different regions of America and got very different results depending on the region as far as the percentage of who got it. It is not really a common sense puzzle, or is it?




posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:02 PM
link   
reply to post by jimmiec
 


The rules appear to relate only to 2 dimensional arrangement.

There is more than one solution.

I don't think that this gives it away, does it?

edit on 4/2/2013 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:16 PM
link   
I like it,and am kinda ashamed that i actually had to give it some thought...




posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:17 PM
link   
Took me a couple minutes too, but a fun thing, thanks. I have my hubby and son staring at the counter now.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:26 PM
link   
Got it. Took about ten seconds to figure out.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:37 PM
link   
Got it!
But pray tell what group of people get it right away?
Is it bankers , lawyers or politicians ?



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:38 PM
link   
Another way of presenting this same puzzle:

1) Create two rows of four coins each

2) Do not add or remove any coins

3) Make only ONE move



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:41 PM
link   
reply to post by jimmiec
 


Here's one for you,

How could you organise it to give an infinite row of coins on each axis?

edit on 4/2/2013 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:42 PM
link   
I got it. It's just that I don't know if I would classify these types of puzzles as common sense as much as a lesson in perception and the way we read and assume certain things.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:44 PM
link   
reply to post by RavenSpeaks
 


A blonde bar maid in one state was the only one out of 100 or so to get it. No, I won't say which state. It WOULD surprise you though.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:44 PM
link   

Originally posted by chr0naut
reply to post by jimmiec
 


Here's one for you,

How could you organise it to give an infinite row of coins on each axis?

edit on 4/2/2013 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)


Into a triangle by moving the bottom two coins up above the three in the cross formation.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:45 PM
link   
reply to post by jimmiec
 


it's not so much a puzzle as it is an ambigous use of the word "direction"...because the solution in 3D space doesn't give you what you are really asking for...it gives 3 coins in one direction, 3 coins in another direction, and 2 coins in another direction. There are never 4 coins on the same planar line for this puzzles solution.

Your use of "coins" is to trick people to think in 2D space. Use any other object and your "puzzle" is exposed for the fallacy it is...do it with balls...do it with boxes...do it with anything else in the 3D world that doesn't "appear" as a 2D object and your "puzzle" falls apart.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:51 PM
link   
I can't believe I had to sit and look at that for a few minutes.


I guess it was TOO simple.

Can you say over analyze?



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:53 PM
link   
reply to post by Cherryontop
 


Actually, rethinking, yes, I could see this as an answer. My solution would require a slightly different topology than a 4 sided pyramidal one (think sphere), but you are right.

Cheerz!

Wonder if others will see it?

edit on 4/2/2013 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 04:55 PM
link   
15 seconds

I had to read it twice



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 05:01 PM
link   
reply to post by chr0naut
 


More than one solution?



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 05:06 PM
link   
There is NOT more than one solution.

It took me 3 seconds.




posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 05:08 PM
link   
reply to post by DetectiveT
 


I have used this puzzle for over 20 years and always wondered what success or failure actually implies. It might be interesting to discuss. It is a great icebreaker if nothing else. It appears to be completely random as to who gets it and who finally gives up. But, is it random? Is it just a certain way of thinking? Is it superior critical thinking? Interesting to say the least in my experience using it.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 05:11 PM
link   

Originally posted by jimmiec
reply to post by DetectiveT
 


But, is it random? Is it just a certain way of thinking? Is it superior critical thinking? Interesting to say the least in my experience using it.


Lateral thinking.

People who get this are more likely to score high on an IQ test, not because they're know it alls, but because they use creative thinking to solve logic problems.

I'm guessing people who get this easily also ace tests easily while not bothering to read much of the subject in school.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 05:12 PM
link   
reply to post by xedocodex
 


Hmm, not really. For instance, I can balance a salt shaker on its edge on a flat table. I won't say how, but i can.





new topics
top topics
 
9
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join