Annoying Phrases or Words

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posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:21 AM
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A few more that we've all been seeing recently:

"gun nut"

"rambo/cowboy"

"wild west"

"herp derp"

"YOLO"

Wow, I'd better stop before I get carried away again.




posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:30 AM
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What really irritates me is the misuse of the words 'literally' or 'surreal'.

For example, "My jaw literally hit the floor" sure it did, because i punched it for hearing such a stupid remark.

Or this one- "I seen a guy wearing the same shirt as me, it was surreal" No it wasn't. Seeing a banana playing bagpipes on the forest moon of Endor would be surreal.

And being an Aussie there is one part of our lingo that annoys me: When someone gets asks a question,the response would be "Yeah, Nah."

But the one that grinds my gears the most is that great sporting term "Full credit to the boys". If I had a drink for every time I heard that line I would've succumbed to liver failure years ago.
edit on 1-2-2013 by Thecakeisalie because: I was like trying to spell something when i had this surreal momement where the keys literally jumped out at me.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:44 AM
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1. "It is what it is."

2. "_________ piece" refering to a part of a problem or a situation.

3. I hate it when my kids say they "can't" do something.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:51 AM
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Originally posted by Logos23
I come from Manchester in the North West of England...people tend to finish every couple of sentences in conversation with " Do ya know wot i mean?" ...Drive's me mad!

Infact a lot of Manc slang drive's me insane.... wicked/ sorted/ minted/ buzzin/ sick.....

Even worse when people put "age" on the end of word's like "sickage"

And the newish one young girl's tend to use..... expanding on "lol" from text speak and using the word "lolage" in conversation referring to something funny.

Also the word "gutted" meaning disappointed or upset

And the word "chuffed" for happy or pleased.


Although in typing this i realize i am guilty of using a few of those word's myself even though they irritate the hell out of me!......shoot me now!!


Is that where all the slang comes from in Britian? I must say that it seems all British people talk as if they are always asking a question. It took me quite a while to get used to it after moving here 3 years ago and it still gets on my nerves, doesnt it?

I live on a military base and I hear everyone saying sorted.... EVERYONE!!



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 07:34 AM
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I cannot stand when my teenage daughter starts out with: That awkward moment when...
I've just taken to finishing her sentence with "you're trying to be funny"



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 07:46 AM
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Period as in full stop
tyranny
have a nice day
blood (as in UK youths refering to each other as this)
Eyeraq as in the was G.W.Bush pronounces Iraq.
Get a handle on it


Thats all I can think of for now. But I have loads, I just can't remember them all.

oh and the American version of Aluminium as in alooooooooominum
edit on 1-2-2013 by michael1983l because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 08:19 AM
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reply to post by BABYBULL24
 


I freaking HATE the word "comfort food". I thought I was the only one.

Also the words "sip", "goodie" and "nibble" are like nails on a chalk board to me.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by Carreau
 

Agree with all of those. I'd add the phrase "I mean". EVERYONE says this and it drives me crazy! My other favorite is when people use the term "literally" as a kind of exclamation point. I believe the term "literally" is used when you want to inform your listener that you are about to use a term or phrase that has a literal and a figurative meaning and you are alerting them that your intention is the literal one. For instance , if someone won a lot
of money at a casino, you might say he "broke the bank" not he "literally broke the bank" Whereas if a little kid smashed his piggy bank in order to get the money out, you would be correct in saying "he literally broke the bank"

great topic!



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 08:24 AM
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Whenever an indivdual adresses me with the term ''bra'' I always reply '' yeah panty''



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 08:44 AM
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reply to post by Wyeldfire
 


Those were great!



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 09:08 AM
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Originally posted by michael1983l
Period as in full stop
tyranny
have a nice day
blood (as in UK youths refering to each other as this)
Eyeraq as in the was G.W.Bush pronounces Iraq.
Get a handle on it


Thats all I can think of for now. But I have loads, I just can't remember them all.

oh and the American version of Aluminium as in alooooooooominum


Michael, old pal, I have bad news for you: First, good luck on changing the minds of Americans from "period" to "full stop." Second, and worse news: You'll have to pry "aluminum" from our cold, dead hands.

WorldWide Words: Aluminum versus Aluminium

The metal was named by the English chemist Sir Humphry Davy (who, you may recall, "abominated gravy, and lived in the odium of having discovered sodium"), even though he was unable to isolate it: that took another two decades’ work by others. He derived the name from the mineral called alumina, which itself had only been named in English by the chemist Joseph Black in 1790. Black took it from the French, who had based it on alum, a white mineral that had been used since ancient times for dyeing and tanning, among other things. Chemically, this is potassium aluminium sulphate (a name which gives me two further opportunities to parade my British spellings of chemical names)...

...Sir Humphry made a bit of a mess of naming this new element, at first spelling it alumium (this was in 1807) then changing it to aluminum, and finally settling on aluminium in 1812. His classically educated scientific colleagues preferred aluminium right from the start, because it had more of a classical ring, and chimed harmoniously with many other elements whose names ended in -ium, like potassium, sodium, and magnesium, all of which had been named by Davy...

...Actually, neither version was often encountered early on: up to about 1855 it had only ever been made in pinhead quantities because it was so hard to extract from its ores; a new French process that involved liquid sodium improved on that to the extent that Emperor Napoleon III had some aluminium cutlery made for state banquets, but it still cost much more than gold. When the statue of Eros in Piccadilly Circus in London was cast from aluminium in 1893 it was still an exotic and expensive choice. This changed only when a way of extracting the metal using cheap hydroelectricity was developed.

It’s clear that the shift in the USA from -ium to -um took place progressively over a period starting in about 1895, when the metal began to be widely available and the word started to be needed in popular writing...


True story....



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 09:09 AM
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reply to post by BABYBULL24
 


Who are you to say what words people should use and should not?

IMO your a racist because you don't like words used by groups outside of your own and you already label someone just by the way they speak...



"Bro or Dude" - whoever says it just want to say shut the heck up you hipster doofus.


I could say your use of the words "hipster doofus" is the dumbest, stupidist combo play on words I have ever heard but becasue I don't judge people by the way they speak.... nevermind.

Grow up and let people speak and use the words that they want to use to express themselves.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 09:24 AM
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I have another one, and this one is exclusive to ATS.

"This is a conspiracy website."

This phrase I see everyday, and it's almost always used in threads that put forth ridiculous claims with zero evidence to back them up, or just after a conspiracy/hoax has been debunked and the OP or other users want to keep the thread going for some reason. A conspiracy isn't something you pull out of your @$$, it's generally found when a piece of evidence is discovered, which in turn sparks a debate.

- The magic bullet
- "We're bringing down building 7."
- A blurry photo of a UFO

All evidence to support a theory.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 09:29 AM
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'A whole nother'
I hear this phrase time and time again, it's not even correct grammer. Theres 'Another whole' but 'WHOLE NOTHER' makes absolutely no sense.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by RightInTwo
'A whole nother'
I hear this phrase time and time again, it's not even correct grammer. Theres 'Another whole' but 'WHOLE NOTHER' makes absolutely no sense.




Sorry. I had to.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 09:44 AM
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reply to post by BABYBULL24
 


I say "dude" all the time, grew up in the 70s 80s lol..

I do get annoyed at this..



All Office Speak like "going forward" &"lets touch base".


And "be that as it may" wtf does that even mean?



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 10:06 AM
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Originally posted by Juggernog
reply to post by BABYBULL24
 


I say "dude" all the time, grew up in the 70s 80s lol..

I do get annoyed at this..



All Office Speak like "going forward" &"lets touch base".


And "be that as it may" wtf does that even mean?


That just reminded me of a phrase an old boss used to say at the end of every other sentence and it drove me insane:

"That having been said..."



edit on 1-2-2013 by AwakeinNM because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by Juggernog

And "be that as it may" wtf does that even mean?


"Be that as it may" is a counter to presented evidence. It's generally used after someone presents a reason for something, and the listener interjects with "Be that as it may" as a way of saying "Even if that is the case; whether that is true or not."

Example:

"Why are you late for work."
"Morning traffic."
"Be that as it may, you know what time we begin here every day."

i.e.> I understand there was morning traffic, however, isn't there morning traffic every day?
Leave your house with enough time to allot for the morning rush."


It's still annoying though.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 10:54 AM
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This one seems to occur mainly with the written word. (I think verbally one can see where the issue comes from).

"Have" & "of" are not interchangeable!!!
"Please may I of a cup have coffee" makes NO SENSE.
Stop doing that.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 11:02 AM
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People who substitute the word "Anywho" for "Anyhow"...Can you spell SHEEP! GGrrrrrr!





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