Yahweh Banned from Catholic Mass?

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posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by adjensen

I am not a language scholar and defer such questions to those who are, such as NOTurTypical.


However, you did respond (without giving proper answer) to the question when I asked NOTurTypical.




posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:09 PM
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Originally posted by truejew

Originally posted by adjensen

I am not a language scholar and defer such questions to those who are, such as NOTurTypical.


However, you did respond (without giving proper answer) to the question when I asked NOTurTypical.

And I answered as someone who has spent a fair amount of time investigating your theology, your church and what Reckart teaches, not as a language scholar.

If you wish to answer NOTurTypical's question and present credentials that demonstrate academic study of the Hebrew and Greek languages, and then demonstrate how "Jesus" appears in the Hebrew Bible, I'll accept that your claim is language related, as well as my aforementioned postulation that it is grounded in legalism and ritualism, because that is patently obvious.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by Akragon
reply to post by FortAnthem
 



I think maybe not using the name is a sign of respect and reverence for the name of God and not some sort of diss.


I wasn't thinking it was a "dis" in any way...

Im just curious as to what those that use that name for God think about this...

We have a few diehard YHWH fans on our forums...

I thought perhaps they might chime in



I don't use that for the name for God but I think this whole thing is a little frivolous. Who cares what the name of God is if you can't embody what is. In my opinion, these practices limit God and subject Him to our finite perception, and these ideas can negatively influenced other's perception of God. However, whenever there is a negative, there is room for a positive so all's good.

When a baby babbles, does not God understand what the baby is saying?

I don't think God gives you brownie points whenever you say YHWH or Jehovah... Call Him God, He acknowledges God. Call Him YHWH, He acknowledges YHWH. Call Him Jehovah, He acknowledges Jehovah. Call Him Father, He acknowledges Father. Call Him Daddy, He acknowledges Daddy. Call Him the Spaghetti Monster, God knows why your heart is as is. It's really an issue of the heart... and I wonder as to how people don't see that, although I have presumptions as to how this is.

Some people today and yesterday thought that God is limited to only certain people, like some of the apostles, until Paul came and chastised them. I wonder who is going to be the next in this line of "revolutionaries" throughout history and if we are going to understand the message or not.
edit on 1-2-2013 by DelayedChristmas because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by truejew
My question would be... Are they still using the equally false guess name "Jehovah" though? Trading one false name for another does them no good.


What is with the name calling; no one can agree upon a name for "God" its true identity. How do you know you are addressing the correct one if known by so many names? I see it as a cunning manuouver just like taking the language "Babal" of mankind living in specific areas and confusing it. If you do not know it or how to address it, It is off the hook for EVERYTHING mankind might desire or ask of it.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:22 PM
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Originally posted by NOTurTypical

What about Greek then? Iesous = "ee-YAY-soos"


The "I" followed by the "e" gives the "I" a "J" sound. The correct way to speak Iesous is very close to Jesus.


Originally posted by NOTurTypical

And Jesus's Hebrew Name was Yeshua.


The correct spelling would be Yeshas. Again the "Y has a "J" sound when followed by the "e". The correct way to speak Yeshas is very close to Jesus.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by adjensen
 


Your false accusations are not on topic to the thread.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:40 PM
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Originally posted by truejew
reply to post by adjensen
 


Your false accusations are not on topic to the thread.

What false accusations? Do you have an academic background in ancient languages or not?

Your claim that God's name is Jesus has nothing to do with the topic of this thread, anyway.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 06:54 PM
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Originally posted by adjensen

Your claim that God's name is Jesus has nothing to do with the topic of this thread, anyway.


You were the one to bring it up.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 07:09 PM
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Originally posted by truejew

Originally posted by adjensen

I am not a language scholar and defer such questions to those who are, such as NOTurTypical.


However, you did respond (without giving proper answer) to the question when I asked NOTurTypical.


I wouldn't point fingers considering you didn't address my point that Ehjeh in Hebrew is not a name but a title.



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by truejew
 


Shas means nothing in Hebrew. "Shua" means saves/salvation. You don't know a lick of Hebrew. There is no J phonetic sound in Hebrew OR Aramaic.



posted on Feb, 2 2013 @ 12:48 AM
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Originally posted by NOTurTypical

I wouldn't point fingers considering you didn't address my point that Ehjeh in Hebrew is not a name but a title.


All other names of God are titles also.
edit on 2-2-2013 by truejew because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2013 @ 01:06 AM
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Originally posted by NOTurTypical
reply to post by truejew
 


Shas means nothing in Hebrew. "Shua" means saves/salvation. You don't know a lick of Hebrew. There is no J phonetic sound in Hebrew OR Aramaic.


Incorrect. Shu(a) is the Egyptian sky god.

See Shu (Egyptian deity)

Shas is a shortened form of Howshea, which means "deliverer".

See top result for Strong's number 3467 Strong's Hebrew Lexicon Search Results

It is where we get the names Hosea, Hoshea, Oshea, and Moses.

Yes, there is a "J" sound in ancient Hebrew.



posted on Feb, 2 2013 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by truejew

Originally posted by NOTurTypical

I wouldn't point fingers considering you didn't address my point that Ehjeh in Hebrew is not a name but a title.


All other names of God are titles also.
edit on 2-2-2013 by truejew because: (no reason given)


That's quite innacurate. One Name is given, dozens of titles are given. And names are not titles.



posted on Feb, 2 2013 @ 01:40 AM
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reply to post by truejew
 


Egyptians don't speak Hebrew. Shua means "a cry" (connotation, for help), "a saving cry/salvation".

Learn basic Hebrew, get a book.



posted on Feb, 2 2013 @ 01:49 AM
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Originally posted by NOTurTypical
reply to post by truejew
 


Egyptians don't speak Hebrew. Shua means "a cry" (connotation, for help), "a saving cry/salvation".

Learn basic Hebrew, get a book.


Ancient Hebrew came from the Egyptian language.

BTW, there was a "J" sound in the Egyptian language.
edit on 2-2-2013 by truejew because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2013 @ 04:15 AM
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Originally posted by truejew

Originally posted by NOTurTypical
reply to post by truejew
 


Egyptians don't speak Hebrew. Shua means "a cry" (connotation, for help), "a saving cry/salvation".

Learn basic Hebrew, get a book.


Ancient Hebrew came from the Egyptian language.

BTW, there was a "J" sound in the Egyptian language.
edit on 2-2-2013 by truejew because: (no reason given)


One problem. The Torah wasn't written in Ancient Hebrew, it's written in Classic Hebrew, which has no phonetic sound for a "J". When you Latinize the Hebrew alphabet you can substitute a "J", example "Jerusalem" for the Hebrew " Yirushalayim".

Please, refrain from trying to teach people Hebrew. It's apparent you have no training whatsoever in the language.


edit on 2-2-2013 by NOTurTypical because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2013 @ 05:32 AM
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BRB
edit on 2/2/2013 by FlyersFan because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2013 @ 07:02 AM
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Originally posted by NOTurTypical

One problem. The Torah wasn't written in Ancient Hebrew, it's written in Classic Hebrew, which has no phonetic sound for a "J". When you Latinize the Hebrew alphabet you can substitute a "J", example "Jerusalem" for the Hebrew " Yirushalayim".


The reason that you can substitute a written "J" in place of the written "Y" is due to it having a "J" sound.


Originally posted by NOTurTypical

Please, refrain from trying to teach people Hebrew. It's apparent you have no training whatsoever in the language


You have learned Hebrew from antichrist sources that want to erase the name of Jesus.

You claim God's name is Yahweh even though there is no Jeh in that name. You claim that Jesus does not have a "J" sound. You ignore the evidence of the names of Hosea and Moses and use the name of the Egyptian sky god.

The next step on your path will be to replace the Jeh in Jesus with the Yah from Yahweh and calling Jesus by the name Yahshua. The step after will be calling Jesus the pig god.
edit on 2-2-2013 by truejew because: Corrected spelling



posted on Feb, 2 2013 @ 11:31 AM
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Originally posted by Akragon
reply to post by NOTurTypical
 


I thought Peter founded their church?



Rome did! Rome! Not Peter!

www.thenazareneway.com...



posted on Feb, 2 2013 @ 11:32 AM
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reply to post by truejew
 


No, you're completely incorrect. You don't know Hebrew.

That's obvious.


P.S. "Moses" is not Hebrew either, his name would be "Moshe" in Hebrew.


HERE is the Hebrew alphabet and phonetic enunciation chart. You'll see there is neither a J letter or phonetic sound. This is basic first week Hebrew.


And I never said "Jesus does not have a phonetic J sound", of course JESUS does, it's the Latinized rendering of the Greek "Iesous" and the Hebrew "Yeshua". But neither the NT or OT was written in Latin. That language did not exist in the first century.

edit on 2-2-2013 by NOTurTypical because: (no reason given)





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