Russian Siberian Family Was Cut Off From All Human Contact for 40 Years- Unaware of World War II !

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posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 04:16 PM
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Check out THIS article: Russian Family Was Cut Off From All Human Contact, for 40 Years, Unaware of World War II

It details (and gives references for further research) the lives of a family that fled persecution decades ago. They have been living in wilderness Siberia! 150 miles from any other human habitation!
They barely eked out a living.
They walked barefoot.
They made their own hemp cloth.
Survived mostly on dried potatoes, rye, and hemp-seed.

After being discovered, two of them died from kidney failure due "most likely, to the harsh diet".

But 40 YEARS these people lived in the wilderness, one of them, a surviving daughter... 70+ years.
No society needed.

The language and voice of the younger girls morphed into some sort of singsongy version of Russian. I image their singsongy linguistics it to have been quite attractive (at least I like the idea of people talking like that all the time).

Their primary form of entertainment: Telling each other their dreams. (Talk about a fluoride free Pineal gland! )


Enjoy the read.
edit on 29-1-2013 by NJoyZ because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 04:26 PM
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and they died right after the were "discovered".

most likely from the thousands of petulances that seem to have emerged after world war 2 and globalization.

they should have treated those people like museum curators examine artifacts, with extreme care and cautiousness.

they lived all their lives in a constant state of war and survived. it can be done.

they didn't know if hitler won the war or not.

thats no way to live. their lives should be viewed as an example of the horrors of war and the triumph to overcome it.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 04:33 PM
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That's pretty amazing, makes you wonder if it's even possible to escape persecution today with emerging identification technologies.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 05:35 PM
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Wow! They sure had it tough. Spending a few years in near starvation and eating thier shoes, berries and bark. Such a monotonous diet. Why did they keep going? I doubt that many people having grown up in today's entitlement nanny state would have the perseverance to survive. LikeI have said before, it will take a strong motivating force to do so, in my opinon only faith and family can be that strong.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 05:44 PM
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Truly amazing!


Yet the Lykovs lived permanently on the edge of famine. It was not until the late 1950s, when Dmitry reached manhood, that they first trapped animals for their meat and skins. Lacking guns and even bows, they could hunt only by digging traps or pursuing prey across the mountains until the animals collapsed from exhaustion. Dmitry built up astonishing endurance, and could hunt barefoot in winter, sometimes returning to the hut after several days, having slept in the open in 40 degrees of frost, a young elk across his shoulders. More often than not, though, there was no meat, and their diet gradually became more monotonous. Wild animals destroyed their crop of carrots, and Agafia recalled the late 1950s as "the hungry years." "We ate the rowanberry leaf," she said,



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by NJoyZ
Their primary form of entertainment: Telling each other their dreams.


That is very interesting. I wonder what they dreamed about?


Reliquiae rerum earum moventur in animis et agitantur, de quibus vigilantes aut cogitavimus aut egimus.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:10 PM
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What an amazing story, in so many ways!

Not only did they eke out a life in Siberia, of all places, but did so successfully. They had rough spots, as do we all, but with perserverence, they recovered.

There was much to learn from them, as only people that have been in even a modicom of that lifestyle would know. They were a veritable treasure trove of knowledge and information, and only the tiniest bit has been shared with us. It would have been amazing to spend time with them, and those that got to were rather lucky.

There was a 3 part video linked at the end of the article, which I watched. It was in Russian, but that's ok. The imagery and sights were worth it. Seeing their home and getting a glimpse ibto their way of life was amazing. So few people would ever survive those challenges. Fewer yet would do so happily.

Thanks for posting this.
edit on 29-1-2013 by Libertygal because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by randomname
most likely from the thousands of petulances that seem to have emerged after world war 2 and globalization.


Petulance definitely doesn't mean what you think it means.

petulance
1. the condition or quality of being irritable, peevish, or impatient.
2. an irritable or peevish statement or action.

I don't think too many people have died from petulance. Certainly not these people.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:28 PM
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The surviving girl chose to stay alone. Incredibly. SnF.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:33 PM
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S and F

Thanks for posting.

This is a story of human endurance and faith. That man saved his family in a haste and not prepared at all and their survival are all the more amazing.




Famine was an ever-present danger in these circumstances, and in 1961 it snowed in June. The hard frost killed everything growing in their garden, and by spring the family had been reduced to eating shoes and bark. Akulina chose to see her children fed, and that year she died of starvation. The rest of the family were saved by what they regarded as a miracle: a single grain of rye sprouted in their pea patch. The Lykovs put up a fence around the shoot and guarded it zealously night and day to keep off mice and squirrels. At harvest time, the solitary spike yielded 18 grains, and from this they painstakingly rebuilt their rye crop.



This part really got to me. Mom chose to go and her family saved by that single grain of rye. Watching grass grows has never been more poignant than this.....
edit on 29-1-2013 by mypan because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:46 PM
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Amazing story of survival but the religious aspect really got me thinking about how much their lives were ruined because of it..

Also how CONVENIENT and LUXURIOUS my life is compared to that.. my god..
Or all the things we know that they never did which comes like a 2nd nature to us...



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by NJoyZ
 


Thank was a truly mesmerizing story. Thanks NJoyZ for posting it.

I wonder if there is potential to make it into a film or something -



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 07:26 PM
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Puts me in the mind of something my grandfather always used to say - if a person is especially unintelligent or ignorant, he'd say: 'such and such doesn't know the war is over.' Being from that generation, he was referring to WWII.

For me that's always been very evocative, as he came of age at around the time WWII was ending, which meant the end of rationing and uboat raids on civilian ferries and supply convoys alike.

Knowing that there were folks so isolated - especially in the USSR, which was so devastated by the war, on a scale that no other Allied nation could match - is simply mind blowing. Granted, it was in Siberia, but surely they would have witnessed mobilizations and such, especially heading toward Japanese occupied China.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by DestroyDestroyDestroy
 


Good question. At first I was going to say of course its possible because of the increase of people trekking to the Mountains and cutting ties with civilization but then that made me wonder, even if you lose all your chipped items, electronics etc would they still be able to see you, track you, via satellites?



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 08:11 PM
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Great survival story during such time of war and hardship. Use of shelled hemp in or as foods probably kept living as long as they did especially with it as a protein source when the hunt was dry.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 08:45 PM
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Originally posted by yourmaker
Amazing story of survival but the religious aspect really got me thinking about how much their lives were ruined because of it..

Also how CONVENIENT and LUXURIOUS my life is compared to that.. my god..
Or all the things we know that they never did which comes like a 2nd nature to us...


but imagine how in tune with nature they were and how uncluttered their minds and spirits must be and how many things that came 2nd nature to them that we could never contemplate .



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 09:10 PM
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Originally posted by randomname
and they died right after the were "discovered".

most likely from the thousands of petulances that seem to have emerged after world war 2 and globalization.

they should have treated those people like museum curators examine artifacts, with extreme care and cautiousness.

they lived all their lives in a constant state of war and survived. it can be done.

they didn't know if hitler won the war or not.

thats no way to live. their lives should be viewed as an example of the horrors of war and the triumph to overcome it.



You did read the part wherw it said they werw running feom the ziocommie bolshevicks right?

It wasnt hitler they were afraid of



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:42 PM
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Wow. A truly riveting story. I wasn't expecting to be so captivated and read the whole thing like that.

How about how drawn they were to the TV at the geologist's camp?? That was fascinating. They didn't seem overly enthused about any of the other technological advancements, but it was said they couldn't resist staring at the TV when they were around it.

Great post, S&F to you



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:47 PM
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sometimes I wish this would happen to me



posted on Jan, 30 2013 @ 12:51 AM
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reply to post by Cinrad
 


You are right on. "Faith and Family"






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