The next generation of Surveillance, from DARPA

page: 1
7
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 10:54 AM
link   
www.dump.com...

found this today, it makes Google maps seem outdated, slow and useless,
but, it seems it is good enough for us to use while taxpayer money goes towards better systems to control and watch the/us slaves.




posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:01 AM
link   
That is pretty amazing. To be able to see so many windows, and the detail. With cell phone cameras. Some are just scary smart.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:04 AM
link   
reply to post by dianashay
 


Better not go breaking the law then, because there is literally nowhere to hide.. But that is the problem isn't it. Freedom is so complex with so many laws, yet to be made....



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:11 AM
link   
reply to post by binkbonk
 


I am disgusted that those who are the most evil of character are safe to roam around in the sunlight and the ones who sponsor them are driven under-ground.

The devil surely must be laughing.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:11 AM
link   
1.8 billion pixels!

Can store up to million terrabytes of video per day!

edit on 29-1-2013 by Clairaudience because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:13 AM
link   
reply to post by Clairaudience
 


Yes, therefore it makes you wonder just how higly advanced the military is with their photography capabilities, which could pretty well debunk the debunker in the video about the impossibility of faking the lunar landings because the equipment was too 'primative'.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:14 AM
link   
reply to post by binkbonk
 


I highly doubt this will be used to track a simple criminal who just robbed a store or stole a car. But surely the military will use it.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:18 AM
link   

Originally posted by Clairaudience
1.8 billion pixels!

A million terrabytes of video per day!



But of course it wont be for the whole day.
It'll just be for the time the UAV was over the area and recording.
eg...for the demo shown in that video, it looked like the city was pasted together from multiple composite "shots", each covering only a few blocks... so each of those "shots" may have been just a few minutes in length.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:20 AM
link   
He doesn't mention that the persons (and vehicles) can be identified by name because of their cellphone or other chip in ID or bank cards etc.

Doesn't mean it isn't possible though.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:26 AM
link   
reply to post by dianashay
 


Absolutely, there are space based platforms already capable of photographing a worm eating its way through an apple. Although this technology will most likely be reserved for military and intelligence usage. Again, public law enforcement will never benefit from it, plus they dont have the money to maintain or buy such systems.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:32 AM
link   
reply to post by dianashay
 


As I said in another thread...I've been told our satalites can tell what type of screw (hex, phillips, flathead) is on the wing of a moving 747 from orbit.

Back in the day, the SR-71 could take high enough rez pics to spot something the size of a golf ball. Remember, they retired that plane quite a while ago, who knows what capabilities they have now.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:35 AM
link   
This is from NOVA the other night. I am not that impressed. I am sure there are better. This one is cool, only because he kept cost down by using cell phone cameras in an array, probably mounted on a convex parabolic plate. When cost is not a limitation, you can have MUCH better than that. The software is also nothing special. Run of the mill motion detection and photo stitch on steroids.
edit on 29-1-2013 by zayonara because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:38 AM
link   
reply to post by Clairaudience
 


Looking towards the future (maybe not too distant) I'm sure this technology will eventually find its place in keeping the masses in line.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:42 AM
link   
Just watched a bit of the video...

Lets just say that AF is using some badass cameras on UAV's and planes in Afghanistan. I don't think they are quite as sophisticated as the OP's. I do know from publically available youtube videos, that their cameras can actually track someone walking as the UAV is flying at 12,000 feet+ (and in thermal too) from over 5 miles away.

I can't remember the name of the defense contractor that was showcasing these under-plane and UAV "turret" style cameras, but they do have youtube videos out there of them.

This is why I call BS on taking 10+ years to track down OBL.

ETA: Yup, it's BAE Systems cameras that the AF is running on their planes and UAV's. Those little boxes help tell friend/foe and the operator can forward that target information on to gunships or ground troops.
edit on 29-1-2013 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)
edit on 29-1-2013 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 11:49 AM
link   
Ha. If only the objects invented through miitary funding were intended to use only on military projects, they all
eventually come to be used by or against the citizens.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 12:27 PM
link   

Originally posted by Clairaudience
reply to post by dianashay
 


Absolutely, there are space based platforms already capable of photographing a worm eating its way through an apple. Although this technology will most likely be reserved for military and intelligence usage. Again, public law enforcement will never benefit from it, plus they dont have the money to maintain or buy such systems.


haha you're funny..

The Washington Times


The FAA Reauthorization Act, which President Obama is expected to sign, also orders the Federal Aviation Administration to develop regulations for the testing and licensing of commercial drones by 2015.

Privacy advocates say the measure will lead to widespread use of drones for electronic surveillance by police agencies across the country and eventually by private companies as well.




The legislation would order the FAA, before the end of the year, to expedite the process through which it authorizes the use of drones by federal, state and local police and other agencies.

The Department of Homeland Security is the only federal agency to discuss openly its use of drones in domestic airspace.

The agency projects that 30,000 drones could be in the nation’s skies by 2020.




So I beg to differ, about what you think will be happening routinely.. 30,000 divided by 50 states is 600 drones per state... They'll be recording large cities on a constant basis so as to map human behavior patterns.. You know scan out the drug dealers..

Our borders would obviously get a lot of these as would our ports.. Local agencies would have access to the data through networking after the fact and alerted in real time to throw up a helicopter, or call out some patrols, or to use smaller cheaper drones to follow a suspect that has already had his path mapped out.
edit on 1/29/2013 by Dustytoad because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 01:24 PM
link   
reply to post by Dustytoad
 


You are only going to be allowed to be addicted to the drugs the bio pharmaceutical conglomerates can make a profit off of.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 02:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by MystikMushroom
As I said in another thread...I've been told our satalites can tell what type of screw (hex, phillips, flathead) is on the wing of a moving 747 from orbit.



Urban legend.
Such stories are often told, never backed up by real life examples, and defy the laws of physics.

The resolution is limited by diffraction effects, and formulas to calculate the resolution of an optical system are readily available on the net.
Note that this is NOT a limitation of the technology currently invented, but of the laws of physics. Invoking the other urban legend of "military has technology 50 years before the public" will not help.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 03:43 PM
link   
reply to post by alfa1
 


Urban legend? That's what they want you to think.

I'll trust my sources over some website anyway, thank you.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 05:24 PM
link   
reply to post by alfa1
 


Funny that the very video in this thread proves you wrong. Again, 1.8 billion mega-pixel camera system... thats far more than the public could ever imagine to be able to buy in the next 50 years.

When taking Moores Law into consideration, the military is even further ahead than 50 years as it has the most sophisticated technologies and the necessary financing.
edit on 29-1-2013 by Clairaudience because: (no reason given)






top topics



 
7
<<   2 >>

log in

join