Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Hubble's Latest Mind-Blowing Cosmic Pictures

page: 4
29
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 03:53 PM
link   
reply to post by ParasuvO
 


Faith has nothing to do with cowardice. It is in fact the opposite. You seem to think cowards use faith to find hope to move about their lives? In fact faith is used to accept any any all things that one witnesses in our 'reality'.

Non faith, judging, and thinking you are carving your own path... is merely an excuse to overcome obstacles meant to teach you a lesson. You are simply turning your head every time your chance to 'know' taps you on the shoulder.

The fact that you feel you are actually the judge, goes to show that you are unable to accept you fate, and therefore not strong enough on your own.

You speak of 'depth' yet you DO NOT KNOW depth. You know what you have witnessed and experienced, yet you attempt to quantify it next to inifnity? Depth is infinite. Faith is infinite. The world where YOU are god/judge only exists in your mind.




posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 03:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by MystikMushroom
Wait, we can see light from a galaxy 10 billion light years away....and we can't get a visual on an exoplanet 100 light years away?



Am I missing something?

Yes, you (and k1k1to) are missing a thing called angular resolution. Compared to galaxies and nebulae, exoplanets are extremely small. It's like comparing a grain of sand with mountains. You can see a mountain from many miles away, but will have a hard time seeing a grain of sand from a few meters away.

Another factor is that exoplanets orbit close to their parent star, and the star's light completely drowns out the reflected light from the planet. I think there are only a couple of cases where a planet has been observed directly.

To k1k1to I'd like to say, get a decent telescope and see for yourself. A lot of astronomical discoveries over the centuries have been done by amateurs who even built their own equipment.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 04:35 PM
link   
already a thread about this here
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 04:49 PM
link   
I don't get picture four, the black hole emitting light.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:30 PM
link   
Wow, if that's not proof the universe exploded into randomness, from nothing, I don't know what will convince you.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:40 PM
link   
I think the pictures are stunning.... real? I have no idea but they are pretty.

Hercules A though may not be a black hole. If you have not watched this recently uploaded video and love space and science... watch it. Watch it with an OPEN mind.
Einstein was right all along about fields.... or so I think.

Check it out...

edit on 29-1-2013 by MamaJ because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:42 PM
link   
reply to post by kingofmd
 


A "system" such as what we observe is not proof of randomness.


Sorry.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:43 PM
link   

Originally posted by wildespace

Originally posted by MystikMushroom
Wait, we can see light from a galaxy 10 billion light years away....and we can't get a visual on an exoplanet 100 light years away?



Am I missing something?

Yes, you (and k1k1to) are missing a thing called angular resolution. Compared to galaxies and nebulae, exoplanets are extremely small. It's like comparing a grain of sand with mountains. You can see a mountain from many miles away, but will have a hard time seeing a grain of sand from a few meters away.

Another factor is that exoplanets orbit close to their parent star, and the star's light completely drowns out the reflected light from the planet. I think there are only a couple of cases where a planet has been observed directly.

To k1k1to I'd like to say, get a decent telescope and see for yourself. A lot of astronomical discoveries over the centuries have been done by amateurs who even built their own equipment.


So wouldn't a mountain 10 billion light years away be smaller than a grain of sand 100 light years away? Another question I have is wouldn't looking at a galaxy 10 billion light years away be like looking through 100 feet of sand to find 1 grain of sand on the other side? I guess what I'm asking is why don't the billions of galaxies between earth and the target galaxy completely obscure the image?



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:52 PM
link   
reply to post by k1k1to
 


I would suggest you purchase either a very good pair of Binoculars or a small Telescope as there are many Galaxies and Gas Nebulas very much the same as was posted here that you can visually see for yourself on a clear dark night.

A good and easy Galaxy to see with even binoculars never mind a scope is M-31 known as the Great Galaxy in the Constellation of Andromeda. If you become familiar with the night sky you can even see this faintly with just your eyes.

I have several Telescopes and powerful Binoculars as well as a set of Digital Binoculars and I am very familiar with a great many Galaxies that can be seen in ones back yard. One very simple and easy to locate Nebula is the Horse Head Nebula in the Constellation of Orion. This Nebula is very easy to locate as well as being spectacular.

It makes no sense for a person to disbelieve something that they can easily prove to be a reality with their own eyes. I really do not see your issue. Perhaps you could explain it to me?

Split Infinity



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 07:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by k1k1to
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


why dont they look into our OWN galaxy and its surrounding "earth like" planets?

i say this is BS


Wow! If only we all could think like you! Man what a great big wonderful nothing we could live in. Where everything is an illusion to the majority and only the few who have the insight to see the truth are aloud to think for themselves. You are truly the hero of the masses. Praise k1k1to! Our leader of all that he/She surveys.
edit on 1/29/2013 by LLCCLL because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 07:10 PM
link   
reply to post by SplitInfinity
 


Agreed.

We have a modest telescope, but Andromeda is visible. One of my favorite viewing targets.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 07:38 PM
link   
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Pardon me but this is just a pet peeve and you should probably ingore me...LOL!...but that Galaxy is M-31 and is located in the Constellation of Andromeda.

Over the years people have more and more called it the Andromeda Galaxy.

Just being a pain. LOL!

Split Infinity



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 07:43 PM
link   
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


I wish this person would explain to me why they do not believe in something that can be so easily proven to exist?

I can only deduce from their lack of a response that they either did not see my post and question or are being stuborn and refusing to answer as they think that either I or anyone else might look down upon their reply.

I would like to assure this person that I would never do this and I am very interested in understanding their reply. I myself on occasion have had another give me information that changed either my opinion or beliefs as long as such information was a provable FACT.

Split Infinity



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 08:13 PM
link   

Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by k1k1to
why dont they use the technology to peer into our own galaxy and its many earth like planets that it contains?
Who says they aren't?

Astronome rs have discovered hundreds of planets orbiting other stars, but only a few have been seen in photographs


Astronomers have discovered more than 850 planets orbiting other stars. These exoplanets are found using a variety of techniques, but most are indirect—we see the effect of the planet on its host star, but we don’t see the planet itself.

However, a very few handful have actually been directly detected—small sparks of light visible next to the brilliant spotlights of their stars. On this page are pictures all the exoplanets we’ve been able to see so far, including other solar systems, and some planets caught in motion as they orbit their parent stars.

Edit to add:
To show the difficulty of finding Earth like planets, here is a picture of Earth taken from the edge of our own solar system, it's only about 0.12 pixel so we can't even see it:

en.wikipedia.org...:Solar_System_Portrait_-_View_of_the_Sun,_Earth_and_Venus.jpg



In the photograph, Earth lies in the center of one of the scattered light rays resulting from taking the image with a small angle between the Sun and the Earth. Earth takes up less than a single pixel (only 0.12 pixel in size as referred to by NASA).
When it's this hard to see Earth even in our own solar system, you should get some idea how hard it might be to see it from a distant solar system.
edit on 29-1-2013 by Arbitrageur because: clarification


Was that a Voyager image? If so, then you simply can't compare it to what hubble can see.
The Voyager probes were built so long ago they used ancient video cameras using power hungry, and slow to scan Vidicon tubes, with just 800x800 lines resolution, which is 640,000 pixels...Thats VGA resolution or the same resolution a cheap webcam has today!
Hubble has two far more sensitive solid state Silicon CCD imaging sensors with a combined resolution of about 17 million pixels...Nearly 27x times more resolution that Voyager!
So if Hubble was where Voyager is now, it could easily see the Earth.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 08:35 PM
link   
reply to post by ProfessorAlfB
 


Now don't go spoiling the sheople minded party. It's not their fault, they know no better. ~$heopleNation



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 09:07 PM
link   
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Truly beautiful - it's amazing to think we're a small part of something so massive.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 09:23 PM
link   
Cheers for these awsome pictures



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 10:01 PM
link   
Please continue this on the Existing Thread.





new topics

top topics



 
29
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join