Automaker Trio Hopes to Bring Hydrogen Back From the Brink

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posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 07:53 PM
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Three titans of the automotive industry – Renault-Nissan, Ford and Daimler (which is parent to 22 car brands, including Mercedes-Benz) – are collaborating on the development of hydrogen fuel-cell technology. Their goal is to have hydrogen-electric cars in people’s driveways in the next five years.

We’ve heard this before, but this time it could be different. Really. Seriously. We swear.

While hydrogen fuel-cell technology has been promised, and in some cases even deployed in various forms during the last century, it has never taken off. Despite the abundance of hydrogen in the world, combined with the technology’s potential to provide a clean alternative to fossil fuels, too many hurdles – including cost, reliability and the lack of a distribution and fueling infrastructure – have stifled its development and widespread adoption.

The automotive ménage à trois aims to eliminate those issues by pooling their engineering talent, scale and power over suppliers to create a common fuel cell stack. Each automaker will throw the same amount of funding into the project to create a vehicle the consortium claims will be “affordable” and designed for the “mass market.” The cars could be available as early as 2017. Each vehicle will use the same core components, but will be built on platforms unique to each automaker, allowing for different body styles, interior configurations and branding.


Wahooooo, so it looks like it's gonna happen!? Hmmmm I bet something gets in the way. I really hope the cars are priced well and look good? Most elec cars look completely daggy.



Here's the link guys....sorry....www.wired.com...
edit on 28-1-2013 by CaptainBeno because: posted link, forgot first time around
edit on Mon Jan 28 2013 by DontTreadOnMe because: TAGS IMPORTANT: Using Content From Other Websites on ATS




posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:10 PM
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I helped build the first several hydrogen-electric transit buses. The technology exist and works quite well.
www.proterra.com...
edit on 28-1-2013 by thesmokingman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by thesmokingman
 


Wow, very cool. I would love to be part of something like that.

Your link appears to be broken?



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:23 PM
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reply to post by CaptainBeno
 

Hopefully I have fixed it. I am not too savvy when it comes to links.
Anyhow, it was quite the honor, the company actually screwed us all over, promising to never move the company out of Golden Colorado, and assuring us ALL our jobs would ALWAYS be safe here in CO. Well, that didnt happen, they let us all engineer and construct these from prototypes to assembly line ready(working out all the flaws), brought in a bunch of people from Greenville S.C., so we could teach them, and then told us that we no longer had jobs with the company. Quite sad, yet still proud of our hard work we put in.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:42 PM
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Where did you see this?


I wonder what they will use for storing the hydrogen... There's been some progress with Metal Hydride tanks.

Metal Hydride for Hydrogen Storage

On a larger scale, the argument against hydrogen as a sustainable alternative to gasoline is that the electricity generation to produce hydrogen is still done by burning fossil fuels.

Let's see how it unfolds



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 09:21 PM
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Originally posted by Qubert
Where did you see this?


I wonder what they will use for storing the hydrogen... There's been some progress with Metal Hydride tanks.

Metal Hydride for Hydrogen Storage

On a larger scale, the argument against hydrogen as a sustainable alternative to gasoline is that the electricity generation to produce hydrogen is still done by burning fossil fuels.

Let's see how it unfolds


Hydrogen is a byproduct of nuclear power too. Definitely a win win.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 09:43 PM
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www.wired.com...reply to post by Qubert
 


So sorry mate, fixed up link above, but here it is for you



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 04:35 AM
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reply to post by Qubert
 




This guy produces all the hydrogen he needs through solar panels, with plenty of solar power left over to charge his batteries and power his home. There's no reason this couldn't be done on a large enough scale to make it virtually free hydrogen for everyone, other than the desire by Big Oil and the big car companies.





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