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The Truth About ADHD and Public Schools

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posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 07:50 PM
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This is hardy new. When my son was 6 (7 years ago, and probably even before my experience with it), almost every single little boy in his grade was "diagnosed" with ADHD. I basically told them that the "symptoms" they were describing were those of...a little boy. Then I told them to piss off. If you ask me, they were either just doing "as they were told" or simply didn't want to be bothered coping with children of that age.

I further believe that this is both a push by the alleged medical/psychiatric industry in cahoots with big pharma to legally push dope on a malleable public and that generations of over medicated children will be having more and more problems coping in society and will need further magic pills for that too.

Truth? No. It's a crock. Though I do agree most kids could use a little more physical activity than many seem to be getting nowadays.
edit on 1/28/2013 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:00 PM
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Originally posted by rabzdguy
Those with add/adhd have higher intuition than others. They are gifts if they know how to use them properly..


Do you have any science to support this claim ...... or is it just an intuition of yours ?



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


I had add as a child and i loved physical activity, i was a great sprinter and soccer player.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by UmbraSumus
 


Science cant prove intuition. Instead they give you pills to hide it away.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:10 PM
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I think nutrition plays a huge part.

I have often wondered about the differences in the chemical physiology on an individual basis. Some people function well on a low-carb diet, others are the exact opposite, so perhaps vitamin / mineral necessities are quite different as well? I think kind of like running a Ferrari on regular gasoline, perhaps not as effecient?

So what if some people have a much higher need for certain vitamins / minerals due to their chemical makeup, and or intelligence? I remember reading that people of higher intelligence have many more connections in the brain, so is it not possible that these people need more nutritionally speaking? If you couple that need with the level of nutrition currently found in today's foods, i.e. frozen dinners, fast food, or even just produce that for whatever reason lacks the same nutritional value as it used to, this could be a huge problem. Also, the chemicals in processed food could be causing sensitivities in certain individuals.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Thanks for all the effort put into this post! It was very informative. I've only known one person all my life who has actually been diagnosed with this disorder (at least only one person who was open about it).



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 11:01 PM
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I feel for you, smylee.

My lil bro, Heed, has ADHD since Kindergarten. He's on Methlyphindate or something like that. Really active little jerk, so much that he doesn't have an ounce of fat on him. But the problem is, he really aggravates us with his behaviour, even on his medicine.

He also plays a lot of video and computer games, which makes him a bear to make him do chores and his homework.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 12:45 AM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Very interesting read, and more relevant from a teacher than from simply some article. So, what we basically have is kids being allowed no exercise, and no free time, who gain weight, and suffer academically because they can't focus for so long, and need to be more active. Then, the schools want to medicate more kids, and also to restrict the size of lunch a child can eat, making the children hungry as a result, and even more unable to concentrate. Basically, the schools are doing the exact opposite of what is needed to improve education. As a teacher, do you see this as simple ignorance, or do you believe there is something more sinister at work? Are our school children being deliberately "dumbed down"?



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 01:34 AM
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So, what does all of this have to do with ADHD? It is my contention, based on my own observations as an educator, that SOME of the students diagnosed with ADHD are, in fact, simply in need of more physical stimulation.

You have a good thread. I don't think many people will get your point though. That big bolded "some" is pretty hard to see.

But I have to ask, what school teaches kids for hours straight? PE, recess, and music and other things were used to break up the monotony of being lectured, at least when I was in school. Are many schools really getting rid of these things? That would be extremely dumb.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 02:29 AM
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I honestly think it has a lot to do with television and other technologies lowering peoples brainwaves. I don't have time to back up that statement right now, but I think that is a big part of it.

I do have first hand experience with taking Adderall. Yes, I know that there are people out there who are legitimately "ADD", but I was one of the many kids misdiagnosed. Adderall is legal METH and as much as I used to love it, I hate it now. Of course it SLOWS you down, it SPEEDS you up so fast (mentally) that you get STUCK in thought and can't move. There have been times it has helped me stay busy and energetic, and there have been times I've been stuck over-thinking something small for hours and hours.

For me it's worked both ways at different times. I think it will do that to anyone, it's freakin METH. Point being, it should be AVOIDED at all costs if possible. I'm pretty sure I have Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder now that I took myself off of it. There have been so many nights that I've not slept (sometimes multiple days), that it really messed up my circadian rhythm.

I just hope I can straighten out the damage I've done to my brain, otherwise it looks like my sleep schedule will be 5am-4pm for the rest of my life.

Stay off METH, kids.

*MODs* Since I'm not glorifying the use of any substance, I hope my message can stay. Thanks



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 04:37 AM
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reply to post by UmbraSumus
 


Right now I'm focusing more on state to state comparisons, but I do intend to look at international data at some point. I have a feeling (no evidence yet, mind you) that some of the countries who outperform us in education will have a different approach to physical exercise.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 04:44 AM
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Originally posted by LadyGreenEyes
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Very interesting read, and more relevant from a teacher than from simply some article. So, what we basically have is kids being allowed no exercise, and no free time, who gain weight, and suffer academically because they can't focus for so long, and need to be more active. Then, the schools want to medicate more kids, and also to restrict the size of lunch a child can eat, making the children hungry as a result, and even more unable to concentrate. Basically, the schools are doing the exact opposite of what is needed to improve education. As a teacher, do you see this as simple ignorance, or do you believe there is something more sinister at work? Are our school children being deliberately "dumbed down"?


I honestly don't know. I think, on the individual school level. It's ignorance.

For example. My principal is in his second year at my school. Before, he taught upper middle school. Now he's the principal of an elementary school.

He fundamentally does not understand that six and seven year olds are different than 12 year olds. Case in point, he recently declared that on the days we get PE, we do not get recess. This has led to more behavior problems in the afternoon. I do brain break exercises at least every hour, but God help me if he comes in the room and sees us dancing to YouTube videos or the wii fit. I get fussed at for being "off schedule,". Very frustrating.

On a national level....who knows? One things for sure...No Child Left Behind has hurt schools....so maybe there is a shadow age da.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 04:46 AM
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Originally posted by Ghost375



So, what does all of this have to do with ADHD? It is my contention, based on my own observations as an educator, that SOME of the students diagnosed with ADHD are, in fact, simply in need of more physical stimulation.

You have a good thread. I don't think many people will get your point though. That big bolded "some" is pretty hard to see.

But I have to ask, what school teaches kids for hours straight? PE, recess, and music and other things were used to break up the monotony of being lectured, at least when I was in school. Are many schools really getting rid of these things? That would be extremely dumb.


They aren't canceling the classes, just shortening the time spent there. For example, music class used to last an hour. Now it's 35 minutes. Which means PE is 35 minutes. The difference is used to give kids ,ore time on academics.
edit on 29-1-2013 by smyleegrl because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:48 AM
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Excellent thread Smylee!! May I suggest an interesting and great book on the very core of your OP? As a mom raising 2 boys ages 7 and 9, I came across this book at a garage sale...It is called Raising Cain-Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys...written by Dan Kindlon and Michael Thompson...one egs. from the book, I will shorten it a bit...Boys are basically brought up NOT to cry, when a boys feelings get hurt, often he will act out in aggression to STOP that emotional welling up of tears in front of his classmates...by acting out in aggression, they are at times described as being ADD or ADHD...it can be as much emotional as it is getting enough physical activity...My book is dog-eared from lending it so much...LOL! Once again, Excellent topic!!



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:49 AM
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ADHD is not real. It's more of a scam for medication.

I was a quiet below average student throughout my middle school and high school days usually getting poor grades. The reason why I got bad grades is because I was not interested in the courses. Yet I excelled when it came to P.E. and physical activities because I loved it. And when I was in P.E. class I was not quiet, I was more open and friendly with people that had the same interest. Humans are different, some learn faster than others. Some like math and english others may like sports and cars for example.

Also, this has a long lasting damaging effects on people that are diagnosed with ADHD like my sister was. She doesn't want to go to college because she feels like she would fail, always using ADHD as an excuse.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 07:48 AM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 

I've never really believed in ADHD. My cousin, who is 18 now, was diagnosed when he was 3 years old. I truly believe that a lot of these symptoms are normal for child behavior. I also noticed that when my cousin was old enough to understand what ADHD he used it to his full advantage when needed. In his mind it gave him the right to act out when he clearly knows right from wrong.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 08:43 AM
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I copletely agree with the OP. Increased physical activity is a must for our children. They need the time to burn off extra energy and learn social skills. It will also reduce the amount of obese children in our schools and teach the importance of staying physically fit and active. One thing that I saw left out is the fact that many schools push for more children to be diagnosed with adhd, autism, and other disabilities, because it gets more funding for the school. Our schools are underfunded and many schools are looking to raise their budgets in any way they can.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 08:43 AM
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3 weeks ago my wife and I had enough. We were going to take our 4 (soon to be 5) year old in because we thought he had to have ADHD or something. We were just getting so frustrated and it was quite frankly hurting everyone in the family to the point where we dreaded coming home from work and hated the weekends. Well...thankfully we did some research on different types of personalities. Our son was very defiant and we found certain methods that works with that type of personality. It took some time but man has it been great!

Tips to help a defiant kid



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


My very intelligent grandson was diagnosed with ADHD in first grade, put on meds which made him focus, but in turn made him depressed, weepy, lost appetite, unsocial, and stunted his growth. However, we tried lower dosages which appeared to work for a while (Concerta was the pill prescribed). Within the past year we have slowly weaned him from any medicine as he appeared to "calm down and focus" better as he aged (now 10). I really am against how quickly he was diagnosed, and on weekends and in the summer would not give him any meds. The more he played and released his energy...the more "normal" he was. He does have a learning disability, but is highly intelligent in creativity, fixing things and photographic memory. This kid just doesn't have ANY interest in reading or writing, however if I read to him he remembers more detail than I! So I ask what has happened to working with these children instead of making blanket statements such as, "Oh he won't sit still in class...probably has ADHD!" What!!! Not every class and subject is stimulating to the average child. There are poor teachers as well as good ones. There are subjects taught that wouldn't stir any human being. When I was in school, this diagnosis of course was unheard of...not because we had better teachers or subjects geared to individual learning, but I believe because there was not a PILL (pushed) to solve every little supposed problem! I have too much to spew out in this one post, but I would like to post something I read a while back that speaks in volumes. I will post right under this one. Thank you for "stirring" my thoughts on this subject.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 09:37 AM
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From the book, "The Element" by Ken Robinson.

In the 1930's, an 8 year old girl was having difficulty at school. She couldn't concentrate, her schoolwork was poor and she was a disruption in class. The school thought she must have a learning disorder (nowadays a kid would most probably be diagnosed with ADHD) and suggested to her parents that she should be in a school for children with special needs. The girl's parents took her to see a psychologist; she was nervous and sat on her hands to stop herself fidgeting. The psychologist directed all the questions at the parents whilst closely observing the child. Eventually, he asked her parents to talk to them outside and as he left the room, he turned on the radio. Once outside, the doctor asked her parents to just watch through the window and see what she did. Instantly, the girl was off her chair, swaying and gracefully moving in time to the music, completely lost in the joy of it.

The psychologist said to her parents 'You do realise that your daughter doesn't have learning difficulties. She's a dancer. Take her to a dance school.'

And so the young girl was taken to a dance school where finally she could be amongst people who had to move in order to think. Gillian Lynne became a successful ballerina and went on to choreograph some of the most successful shows of all time, including The Phantom of the Opera and Cats.





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