Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Dead astronauts in space...

page: 3
3
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 27 2013 @ 07:21 PM
link   

Originally posted by JimOberg

Joke went around in Brooklyn soon after launch of 'Layka'.

Caution -- ethnic stereotypes.

I was a kid at the time, already a space nut, and i heard it.

Man discusses space events with Giuseppi, his barber.

Giuseppi is sad that "Laika, she's-a gonna die."

Man -- a Russian from Brighten Beach - corrects his barber.

"No, no, moy frend, 'layka' iss nyet her name, 'layka' iss breed of dog.
She is NOT 'Layka", nyeh, she is A 'layka'."

Giuseppi is even more upset.

"What'a you mean, she's-a 'layka'? She's-a NO 'layka'.

She's-a hav-a no CHOICE."


No dogs were harmed in the production of this horrible pun.






posted on Jan, 27 2013 @ 07:53 PM
link   
reply to post by 1nquisitive
 


1 would think those would be cosmic representatives of or not of EA*RTH and so would show respect for them lost... Who may get involved in situations many wouldn't imagine occur. Interesting op



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:55 AM
link   
I read an article that was quite long on Soviet space race incidents.
I have no link, if someone else knows the article it would be great for support:

Several animal staffed journeys. Most did well, but there was a few errors resulting in explsovie decompression. Which is a gooey mess. I believe two capsules returned this way.

It is believed that the Russians sent men up into space before they released the info to the world. One was lost after his I instruments put him in a non-returning orbit. A second raft was sent to reduce him, but the connection couldn't be made. He remained in orbit. I believe he took a one way space walk (he had no suit).

The is a story in the article that states that the first woman astronaut (who's name escapes me, if it was in the article at all). The test was to see how long the radio would work, at increasing distances. Three week later she could still be heard. He ticket was known to be one way before she left the ground. I think everyone should know this woman's name.

It was a wonderful article/essay/book. I was completely engaged. If anyone know what I mean, please add it.

My diction errors are widespread. Try to forgive



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 10:10 AM
link   

Originally posted by SeenAlot
I read an article that was quite long on Soviet space race incidents.
I have no link, if someone else knows the article it would be great for support:

Several animal staffed journeys. Most did well, but there was a few errors resulting in explsovie decompression. Which is a gooey mess. I believe two capsules returned this way. .....My diction errors are widespread. Try to forgive


Your use of English is completely clear, you wrote carefully and precisely, no apologies necessary.

The stories you recall were very, very common in the old days, when there was much deliberate concealment and camouflage by the Soviet Union.

All of them turned out to be exaggerations and misundertsandings, with a few falsifications thrown in.

But to arrive at those conclusions took many years of diligent investigation by amateur space historians around the world. And later, in Russia itself.

It is my immense pride that I was able to be one of them, and I've written up those experiences. see the 'history' section of my home page, linked via signature below.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 07:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by midnightstar
o would a gun discharge in space?? i dought it .


The Russians mounted cannon (Nudelman canon) on some of their stations. For example Almaz. This was test-fired. I believe remotely? I'm sure Jim can add to the details?

The cannon is featured in the following video. Footage at 06:39 and discussion before it. Language is Russian.


edit on 28/1/2013 by tommyjo because: Malformed link corrected



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 08:46 AM
link   

Originally posted by tommyjo

Originally posted by midnightstar
o would a gun discharge in space?? i dought it .


The Russians mounted cannon (Nudelman canon) on some of their stations. For example Almaz. This was test-fired. I believe remotely? I'm sure Jim can add to the details?

The cannon is featured in the following video. Footage at 06:39 and discussion before it. Language is Russian.



And there are those 'survival pistols' [how's that for a contradiction?] in the Soyuz emergency kits.

But opening the shuttle hatch was the most feasible suicide technique -- which also involved homicide of all the other crew.

The space station hatch opens inward, so it's more complex and requires the airlock to be depresusrized first.



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 11:28 AM
link   
reply to post by JimOberg
 


Well now, if it wasn't your damn article.

THAT is funny. At least I recalled the info fairly correctly. It was excellent. I'm gonna go troll more of your site.





new topics

top topics



 
3
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join