Who Owns The Wheelie Bin Companies????

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posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 05:54 AM
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reply to post by christina-66
 


I once saw a guy unloading a shiny new wheelie bin to someone's house and was intrigued as to how much they cost because our district only provides household and garden waste bins. I think he said £50. Anyway I then asked him ''what if someone nicks it?''. He said, ''it doesn't matter because they are all chipped!


Now although this is good in the sense that I could trace my stolen wheelie bin, it does make me wonder about the future when they start introducing carbon taxes etc...




posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 05:56 AM
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reply to post by christina-66
 


Hi,
Just wanted to come back to a few of you with some facts rather than rumours about wheeled bins in the UK.
There are a number of manufacturers who supply the UK Local Authorities with wheeled bins. Some are UK manufactured and others are made in Europe. Regarding the comment about corruption, this would be extremely difficult to do as most purchases made by local authorities are made via independent framework agreements, where prices are agreed, published and set for a fixed time period. Local authorities also publish any expenditure over a set figure, eg £500.00 so that everything is transparent.
With regards to what happens when a wheeled bin becomes waste itself, they are recyclable. The plastic itself is shredded, treated and made into another plastic product, maybe even another wheeled bin!
The serial number on a wheeled bin is most likely there for identification purposes, and not for spying on what householders are putting into their bins.
Finally, regarding Council Tax. Your local council will get about £1 per week out of your council tax for collecting and disposing of your waste. If you read your council tax information leaflet, you will see that the majority of your council tax actually goes towards the fire brigade, police service, county council, parish council etc. Put it this way, I think that fiftz pounds per year to collect and dispose of my waste is perfectly reasonable!!



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 06:04 AM
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Originally posted by LightAssassin
reply to post by christina-66
 


Haha, we get them for free here in Australia, and only have to pay for extra bins.

We get 1 standard rubbish, 1 recycling and 1 garden waste.....all for free.

I do love this country sometimes.

we get them for free too - but tax payers pay.



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 07:47 AM
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reply to post by anonymous12345
 


Thanks for the post. You realise this thread is half kidding but full of earnest I hope?

I mean it is a joke that local authorities think that 5 bins lined up at peoples' front doors improves the environment....or that any excess waste is simply left for the foxes, or worse, to feast upon. For goodness sake we now live with domestic fly tippers.

Our council may well get £1/week for waste disposal but I can assure you they are not spending the remainder on essential services - they are in fact using the major portion of the council tax I pay to meet their current pension liabilities (not even for a pension pot for future pension commitments).

Albeit this policy was probably put in place with good intentions it seems to me that vast amounts of money have spent on these plastic monstrosities completely unnecessarily (I would refer once again to the practices in Switzerland - much more efficient and much less unsightly.)

edit on 25-1-2013 by christina-66 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 08:25 AM
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reply to post by anonymous12345
 


Thank you, I was about to post much the same info but you beat me to it..

Quite frankly, its amazing how many of the "new generation" of tax payers think that council tax is only for the collection of refuse. They must think that the police, fire, (not ambulance, comes from the NHS budget), street lighting, etc are funded from thin air. No, they are funded from council tax.

Some authorities charge for replacement wheelie bins, some don't. The concept is good but I do have a few issues with them.

1) They are breeding. We started off with a single black bin. Then we got given a green one for garden waste as well, then a blue one for paper, then a grey one, and as from next year, they are adding a red one. That will be 5 bins. I simply don't have room for them. They eat over 50% of my already small garden.

Then you consider why they are breeding, simply so the collections companies can earn extra cash by selling the recyclables, which you are forced to sort for them. They don't even have to provide their own sorters. Not to mention the £750 fine if you get caught repeatedly putting the wrong trash in the wrong bin.

2) Its not common knowlege that the bins are RFID chipped and the trucks are equipped with chip readers. This was originally done with a PPT (pay per throw) scheme in mind, where your bin would be weighed and you would recieve an extra bill if its weight exceeded some arbitary amount. This scheme was shelved (not scrapped) due to its unpopularity, but its only shelved, and the technology for it is still extant.

Anyway, thats all I have to say. So far



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 08:26 AM
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reply to post by MystikMushroom
 

This is what happens, when you need get rid of your bin




(sorry, couldn't resist OT)



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 08:37 AM
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reply to post by crankyoldman
 


Incorrect. UK law is quite clear on this. The second you throw items into a receptacle designed for the holding/collection of waste, you have relinquished all claims of ownership on said items until such a time that you choose to remove them from the waste receptacle.

This is why dumpster-diving is not theft, all they can get you for is trespass.



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by BMorris
reply to post by crankyoldman
 


Incorrect. UK law is quite clear on this. The second you throw items into a receptacle designed for the holding/collection of waste, you have relinquished all claims of ownership on said items until such a time that you choose to remove them from the waste receptacle.

This is why dumpster-diving is not theft, all they can get you for is trespass.



First off, read what I said again for comprehension, not so you can refute it without understanding what I said. Second, I live in the US, while the laws might be slightly different in "word" the law of those with the ability to tax is the same. Third, dumpster diving COULD be considered theft if the person wanted to press charges in a civil matter and easily win a judgment. The "wheelie bins" are a civil matter of contract law, hence the reason the "state" needs to take control of the property before they can "sell" it. Prior to the profit center of recycling etc., the state was in the business of simply dumping stuff per request of the land owner. Now, since the state is collecting cash for the land owners property, they need to establish a claim of right, a contract to legally own the items in the bin, so, by virtue of the bin being theirs, they have established enough of a contract that, in CIVIL court, they'd win. Oddly enough, in CA, it is a crime, criminal law, to take property out of the bin - the one who presses charges is the state, as the state is the victim!



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 11:30 AM
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Originally posted by MystikMushroom
Here's a question...

If you throw away trash/rubbish in a wheelie bin, what happens when you need to throw a wheelie bin away? Are there even bigger wheelie bins?


Kind of like the "How does the man who drives the snow plow get to work?" problem, only in reverse.



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 12:34 PM
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My son just made another point for me
There may be many different manufacturers - but who owns the patent?



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 01:03 PM
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reply to post by christina-66
 


Note to self - found it!


The modern bin is a German invention of the 1970s in a patent held by Schneider, and licensed to other companies outside Germany.



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by crankyoldman
 


I think you'll find that contary to common misconception, US law does not apply to the UK. Sorry, I know that must be disappointing for you.

Nor does UK law apply to the US, but at least most Brits realise that.

I apologize for assuming you were in the UK, its just that mostly people in this thread were discussing the UK angle.




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