The Most Interesting Mars Picture I've Come Across.

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posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 02:51 PM
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While I went in with an open mind, I am not convinced that any of these pictures depict something that is not natural. What I mainly see evidence of is moving liquid. There are classic erosion patterns exactly like we can find on Earth. There are so many rocks that come close to being a shape, or approach looking like something unnatural, but they clearly are rocks, that it is natural to assume that there will be rocks that look somewhat figure-like or have known shapes.

And one major flaw is that the scale provided by NASA seems to be close. For instance, the "panel" piece, which is one of the only two objects worth considering, is extremely small. I see no reason why it could not be the surface of a flat rock. With all of the erosion that is evident in the picture, there are going to be many flat surfaces, depending on how the liquid that eroded them was flowing, and where it was flowing. And notice all of the lines everywhere? That happens with mud that dries on Earth as well. So it is likely that the "panel" is one of these arrangements of natural material.

The holes that are found in rocks can also be found on Earth, all over the place, where water has met natural rock. There are many famous formations that were created in just this manner. So all in all, I think that this is simply a case of the human brain finding patterns in the chaos and randomness of nature. These examples are identical to many examples that can be found on Earth, and that are products of natural processes of active planets. Mars was active at one time, with liquid water, and perhaps oceans. But any evidence of life that may have lived on the planet is not going to be visible on the surface. Especially considering what evidence there is that erosion has taken place, as stone and rock are not going to last through such a process unscathed.




posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by jnyblujns
 


it may be rare on Mars I don't know I have not looked at tons of pictures.

Here on earth however it is not rare, most people live a close distance to some strange rock forms or another and that is a fact. If you love nature and are not city bound you will have seen some strange and spectacular stuff, I have.

Do a search for rock forms and there are many geological terms that will bring other interesting results.

a few neat things here


www.google.com...=en&t bo=d&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=strange+rock+forms+&oq=strange+rock+forms+&gs_l=img.12...92739.92739.2.98401.1.1.0.0.0.0.63.63.1.1.0...0.0...1c.1.eorvYyT42DY&fp= 1&biw=1024&bih=728&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&cad=b



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 02:51 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by doobydoll
That 'panel' type object lying flat on the ground couldn't possibly be a natural formation

Why?

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.
edit on 24/1/2013 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by JiggyPotamus
While I went in with an open mind, I am not convinced that any of these pictures depict something that is not natural. What I mainly see evidence of is moving liquid. There are classic erosion patterns exactly like we can find on Earth. There are so many rocks that come close to being a shape, or approach looking like something unnatural, but they clearly are rocks, that it is natural to assume that there will be rocks that look somewhat figure-like or have known shapes.

And one major flaw is that the scale provided by NASA seems to be close. For instance, the "panel" piece, which is one of the only two objects worth considering, is extremely small. I see no reason why it could not be the surface of a flat rock. With all of the erosion that is evident in the picture, there are going to be many flat surfaces, depending on how the liquid that eroded them was flowing, and where it was flowing. And notice all of the lines everywhere? That happens with mud that dries on Earth as well. So it is likely that the "panel" is one of these arrangements of natural material.

The holes that are found in rocks can also be found on Earth, all over the place, where water has met natural rock. There are many famous formations that were created in just this manner. So all in all, I think that this is simply a case of the human brain finding patterns in the chaos and randomness of nature. These examples are identical to many examples that can be found on Earth, and that are products of natural processes of active planets. Mars was active at one time, with liquid water, and perhaps oceans. But any evidence of life that may have lived on the planet is not going to be visible on the surface. Especially considering what evidence there is that erosion has taken place, as stone and rock are not going to last through such a process unscathed.


Yes and add extreme cold to that and look at the arctic dry valleys to see the stunning things it does to rock.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by network dude
 


In my opinion and based on observation of that photo, there appears to be more rock "panels" of differing shapes and sizes near the one with the right angle, separated by dust filled cracks. To me, it looks like a weathered shale bed. Though I'm not discounting anything, it is possible it could be something else, but the rock lover in me says its fractured shale ( or some sort of sedimentary rock ).



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 02:55 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by jnyblujns
Do a Google search for a natural perfect triangle shaped stone. Word it however you want, you won't find a single one.

You don't even know if it's a perfect triangle, why should other people find one?


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by doobydoll
That 'panel' type object lying flat on the ground couldn't possibly be a natural formation

Why?

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.
edit on 24/1/2013 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)


It is very obviously a straight edge with a shadow under it. It certainly isn't any "rock" I could imagine. I won't go out and say what it is, as I have no earthly (or marsly) idea, but it's interesting enough to warrant further investigation IMHO.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:02 PM
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Originally posted by VoidFire
reply to post by network dude
 


In my opinion and based on observation of that photo, there appears to be more rock "panels" of differing shapes and sizes near the one with the right angle, separated by dust filled cracks. To me, it looks like a weathered shale bed. Though I'm not discounting anything, it is possible it could be something else, but the rock lover in me says its fractured shale ( or some sort of sedimentary rock ).


That's a very good thought, but it would have to be wafer thin. (like a mint)
I just think out of all the interesting "rock" pictures, that one stands out WAY above the rest. again, IMHO.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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This video is interesting, it takes 2 photo's, the original and the edited. It shows how nasa is editing photo's. If nothing is their then why is their a need to edit them?



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by jnyblujns
Do a Google search for a natural perfect triangle shaped stone. Word it however you want, you won't find a single one.

Is this good enough for you? I suppose it won't be, for whatever reason.

Kimmeridge Bay triangles


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by network dude
 


A slight angling edge can produce a shadow on a small flat rock, especially if the sun is not facing that side.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by network dude
It is very obviously a straight edge with a shadow under it.

I agree.


It certainly isn't any "rock" I could imagine.

It's a rock I can imagine.



I won't go out and say what it is, as I have no earthly (or marsly) idea, but it's interesting enough to warrant further investigation IMHO.

No doubt about it, that photo really has many interesting points, I even think that's one of the most interesting images from Mars I have seen, but not because of the supposedly artificial looking rocks but because of the (I suppose) fact that they are rocks, as rocks like that may give many clues or even real data about what happened in Mars millions of years ago.



As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by BrandonD

Originally posted by VoidFire
Within this link, you can see an example with fractures in shale, and as to how easily it can form right angles. (in terms of what I see in the image below). Though the link I posted does hold some origin and areas as to where shale formations can form and how. Shale Cracks

And here is the Image I am reffering to in that Link.


Edit: I'm still very new, so I'm not sure if that pic link or site link was allowed or not, so forgive me if it wasn't...
edit on 24-1-2013 by VoidFire because: Geology reasons
edit on 24-1-2013 by VoidFire because: unsure


The example you gave supports exactly what I said, so I'll repeat it:

If the "panel" is in fact a natural phenomenon caused by temperature or atmospheric conditions, then you would very logically expect to see more than *one* lonely instance of it.

Show a mars image with a large area covered in that type of terrain - exactly like the "shale photo" that you referenced - and I believe this theory would have some merit.

I'm not saying it's a piece of plywood from a martian doghouse, I'm saying a very thin panel-like object sitting all by itself seems genuinely anomalous.


Here is the full size image:
photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...
much of the right side of the photo has similarities to the "panel"



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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Originally posted by jnyblujns

To the person who says the "panel" is just a mud crack and provided a Google image search link, not a single one of the images you provide look even remotely like the lone "panel" I pointed out.



Originally posted by jnyblujns

If you download the original image, there are several of these "panels" in various places sticking up from the ground, all with perfect 90 degree angles.


So there are several of them? Well, that lends itself more to a natural phenomena. Mud drapes, or some other sedimentary deposit. Though looking at the (apparent) cohesiveness of it I would venture that it is made up of clays. The 'perfect' 90 degree angles can occur in nature quite readily. If you go to a river of lake shore after a flood you can see them all over the place. They're not uncommon.




All of you who say, "these are just rocks and they're everywhere, just go outside". Ok....you do that...please go outside and bring in a handful of perfect cubes and triangles and take some pics to show us all how common these shapes are in nature.


Firstly, I would contest that what you have shown are not 'perfect' cubes or triangles. They may appear similar to perfect, but they don't look like that to me. There are rounded corners and not entirely straight edges.
I see many cubic rocks and even triangle rocks, almost daily. Rocks have fracture and crystals have cleavage and this (cleavage) occurs on the atomic level, so it is not uncommon at all. In fact, cleavage can dictate the form, and fracture can manipulate the form into something that appears cubic, or triangular.
One of my paperweights is a 'cubic' rock which is a small piece of quatzo-feldspathic litharenite, obviously fractured into that shape and slightly tumbled in a river until I was lucky enough to pick it up.

I'm sorry, there is a logical and parsimonious explanation for those images you posted.





posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Man, don't be a wet blanket. We could be speculating what kind of street sign it was!
If it's just a rock, then it's no different than any other rocks, except for the shape.

It just exceeded my expectations is all.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by network dude
 


But it is different from any of the other rocks, atleast to those on Earth. These Martian Rocks can help us to determine whether there were oceans, rivers, tectonic or volcanic forces at work on Mars. Rocks that appear to be sedimentary may as well be a sign that there once was a river or an ocean present in that area. Dark lumpy protrusions may have once been volcanic intrusions that cooled and were exposed by weathering and erosion. There are many things rocks can tell us of an environment, especially that not of Earth. It's rather amazing, really.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by Infi8nity
This video is interesting, it takes 2 photo's, the original and the edited. It shows how nasa is editing photo's. If nothing is their then why is their a need to edit them?

It was the mosaic of images for the famous "self-portrait" by Curiosity. Those images needed to be stitched together into one big image. I don't know the exact process they used, but chances are they used panorama stitching software like Hugin or Microsoft ICE, and some areas needed to be photoshopped or cloned to cover up the bad stitching.

You can see the original, raw, and unedited images at mars.jpl.nasa.gov...
including the ones used for the "self-portrait" - mars.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by jessejamesxx
#10, the panel image is probably the most peculiar. How does something like that happen in nature?


Take a look at a few of these common rock types on this link. Nature is truly an artist!

a2zuseful.blogspot.com...



Not a bone!



icestories.exploratorium.edu...
edit on 24-1-2013 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 04:56 PM
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Must see some of the pictures of McMurdo Dry Valleys very similar conditions to Mars in some ways.

www.mcmurdodryvalleys.aq...

www.amusingplanet.com...

A beauty!


www.dailygalaxy.com...



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 04:58 PM
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Dried lake bed in Sinai. Look at all those "panels"!







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