The Most Interesting Mars Picture I've Come Across.

page: 17
234
<< 14  15  16    18  19 >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 27 2013 @ 12:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by RoScoLaz
interesting stuff. particularly this;




Looks like a spider hole, very interesting indeed.

Jus' Sayin"


spez




posted on Jan, 27 2013 @ 01:48 PM
link   
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by ProfessorAlfB
Oh and BTW, did noone else here notice the dead leaves and that twig under the large overhanging rock on the left of frame of the original pic?...Bit of a give away, dont you think?

No one noticed it because they are not dead leaves or a twig.




As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.
edit on 27/1/2013 by ArMaP because: forgot the "mod thingy"



posted on Jan, 27 2013 @ 04:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by ProfessorAlfB

Originally posted by Helious

Originally posted by Zcustosmorum
Perfect carved circle


Hoaglands theory on the same species being responsible for Mars and Pumu Punku is an interesting idea also
edit on 25-1-2013 by Zcustosmorum because: (no reason given)


It looks to me to be more likely a fossil as the channel it is found just off of sure looks like it carried running water at some point but obviously that is superficial speculation.


You are correct, it could well be a fossil...Considering that Ancient life has ALREADY been found on Mars!
Remember the worm like bacterium/s found in that Martian meteorite that was found in Antarctica?
Strange how that news seems to have been swept under the carpet!:
www.dailymail.co.uk...

Oh and BTW, did noone else here notice the dead leaves and that twig under the large overhanging rock on the left of frame of the original pic?...Bit of a give away, dont you think?
edit on 27-1-2013 by ProfessorAlfB
edit on 27-1-2013 by ProfessorAlfB because: (no reason given)


How the heck could there be dead leaves or a twig? Even if there were a tree in the distant past that they fell from, there is no way they would even exist in the atmosphere of today's Mars.

A give-away? If there was anything in these PUBLICLY RELEASED NASA IMAGES, then I'm sure other places and Scientists would be chiming in.

And you all are looking at NASA handouts of white-balanced images. There is a thread somewhere here with mosaics that are NOT officially released and more up to date in true color. Those are the ones that people should be looking for "things" - not these handout images.


Edit - even though the raw images are sometimes on the site, most of the ones mentioned are harder to find and don't make it to the official NASA server for days.
edit on 1/27/2013 by impaired because: (no reason given)
extra DIV



posted on Jan, 27 2013 @ 05:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by ArMaP

Originally posted by ProfessorAlfB
Oh and BTW, did noone else here notice the dead leaves and that twig under the large overhanging rock on the left of frame of the original pic?...Bit of a give away, dont you think?

No one noticed it because they are not dead leaves or a twig.


Look at the full sized image on the NASA site, not the tiny image posted on here...You can rubbish the dead leaves if you like but you have to agree that certainly looks like a twig...Mars dust would never roll itself into an extremely thin cylinder like that, and its not even the same colour as the dust!



posted on Jan, 27 2013 @ 06:51 PM
link   
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by ProfessorAlfB
Look at the full sized image on the NASA site, not the tiny image posted on here...

I always look at the originals.



You can rubbish the dead leaves if you like but you have to agree that certainly looks like a twig...Mars dust would never roll itself into an extremely thin cylinder like that, and its not even the same colour as the dust!

OK, first of all, let's see if we are talking about the same thing.

Are you talking about this area?




As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.
edit on 27/1/2013 by ArMaP because: forgot the "mod thingy"
edit on 28/1/2013 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2013 @ 07:46 PM
link   
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


The 3D versions of that rock with the "carved circle".

An animated GIF.


A cross-eye version.


A Red-Blue anaglyph.


The images don't have the same resolution, and because the cameras were so close to the target (yes, those rocks are small) there's a strong distortion when comparing the photos from the left and right cameras, so the images above do not look as good as they would be in optimal conditions.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jan, 27 2013 @ 07:54 PM
link   
It looks like a twig to me. Are we certain that this is a Mars photo?



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 12:10 AM
link   
I did the best I could to blow off all of those pictures as just cool rocks - the reptile one is awesome, but I call coincidence even though I saw something lizard like in it on the left side before I even read your caption or realized you meant the whole thing. That is a super super cool rock, but I call just cool rock.

You got me with the flat panel though. Curious. How fun.

Thanks for doing all of that - really enjoyed looking through it.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 03:14 AM
link   

Originally posted by ArMaP
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by ProfessorAlfB
Look at the full sized image on the NASA site, not the tiny image posted on here...

I always look at the originals.



You can rubbish the dead leaves if you like but you have to agree that certainly looks like a twig...Mars dust would never roll itself into an extremely thin cylinder like that, and its not even the same colour as the dust!

OK, first of all, let's see if we are talking about the same thing.

Are you talking about this area?




As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.
edit on 27/1/2013 by ArMaP because: forgot the "mod thingy"



Yes.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:06 AM
link   
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


reply to post by ProfessorAlfB
 


Is the "twig" the object inside the red rectangle?
(click for full size)


If it is, then I think it's just one of the ridges between flat areas that can be seen in many places on the panoramic image. They remind me of the salt that remains around a puddle when the water evaporates.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 09:04 AM
link   
Maybe these were referenced some place else but..
A gallery of shots including 1 night photo.
The plate pattern is shown in multiple photos and is naturally occurring..
The other thing is you really get an appreciation for the technology used on the explorer.

www.cnn.com...



edit on 28-1-2013 by opethPA because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 09:05 AM
link   
reply to post by ArMaP
 


From what I heard, they are veins exposed through erosion of the rock around them. The whole site is one big erosion pan, hence the weird-looking rocks.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 10:54 AM
link   
How come nobody's screaming bloody alien lifeforms over these images?






posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 05:07 PM
link   

Perhaps it's a feature that both the moon and Mars share, because these hi-res images straight from NASA show some pretty intriguing oddities captured on film by Curiosity, described by an Above Top Secret member as "The Most Interesting Mars Picture I've Come Across." While it's clear all of these objects most likely have natural explanations, i.e. rocks shaped by erosion or just plain paredolia, the flat panel is a bit startling. Whatever it is, it has definite right angles that are not normally naturally formed in nature not to mention completely out of place on the surface of Mars. What are we looking at here? We'd consider that the most interesting Mars picture we've ever seen...


You made the anomalist! Saw it ther a bit ago. Very cool.
www.anomalist.com...
edit on 28-1-2013 by RUFFREADY because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 05:14 PM
link   
reply to post by buddhasystem
 


because they're not?



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 07:10 PM
link   
Thought you might enjoy today's National Geographic photo of the day, because it totally reminded me of your lizard rock - especially with the babies as I see a smaller lizard in that image hanging out under what would be the left eye (right for the lizard) of the big head.

The link will only work exactly for today, so anyone looking at this later you want the photo from Jan 28, 2013. I don't know how else to link it.

photography.nationalgeographic.com...



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 07:44 PM
link   

Originally posted by RoScoLaz
reply to post by buddhasystem
 


because they're not?


How do you know that? They sure look a lot more alive than the rocks in the pics from Mars posted in this thread.



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 08:22 PM
link   
reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


The sheet is buried by a bit of soil on one side but is most definitely an artificial sheet and has distinct top left corner. Don't know what you're seeing at all. The others are rounded organic shapes that are not machined like the top sheet was.



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 03:12 PM
link   
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by Unity_99
The sheet is buried by a bit of soil on one side but is most definitely an artificial sheet and has distinct top left corner.

Did you see this post on page 13?


Originally posted by wildespace
Here's the OP's "panel" from a different angle (almost top-down). It looks just like any other slab of sediment, probably slate.



I wish people didn't assume they are geology experts to assert that this cannot form naturally.



As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.
edit on 29/1/2013 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2013 @ 06:33 PM
link   

Originally posted by RUFFREADY

Perhaps it's a feature that both the moon and Mars share, because these hi-res images straight from NASA show some pretty intriguing oddities captured on film by Curiosity, described by an Above Top Secret member as "The Most Interesting Mars Picture I've Come Across." While it's clear all of these objects most likely have natural explanations, i.e. rocks shaped by erosion or just plain paredolia, the flat panel is a bit startling. Whatever it is, it has definite right angles that are not normally naturally formed in nature not to mention completely out of place on the surface of Mars. What are we looking at here? We'd consider that the most interesting Mars picture we've ever seen...


You made the anomalist! Saw it ther a bit ago. Very cool.
www.anomalist.com...
edit on 28-1-2013 by RUFFREADY because: (no reason given)


The problem is that people just swallow this crap without any investigation and then like a disease it spreads to other sites, making all of us at ATS look like nutters.Your post above, is a good example of this.
How many different photos from different angles do people need to prove these are just rocks?
ATS is about cutting through all the crap to get to the truth, blind faith belongs in church.





new topics
top topics
active topics
 
234
<< 14  15  16    18  19 >>

log in

join