My Quick Review, Summary & Commentary on Research Related to Violent Video Games and Increased Viole

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posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 10:58 PM
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My Quick Review, Summary & Commentary on Research Related to Violent Video Games and Increased Violence Potential and Behavior

From:

electronics.howstuffworks.com...

Do violent video games lead to real violence?
by Julia Layton


Bo Xian color bold emphases added:




There's some evidence to this effect, including a study reported in the journal "Psychological Science" in 2001. The report is an overall analysis of 35 individual studies on video game violence. It found several common conclusions, including:

• Children who play violent video games experience an increase in physiological signs of aggression. According to the authors behind the meta-analysis, when young people are playing a violent video game, [color=6699FF]their blood pressure and heart rate increases, and "fight or flight" hormones like adrenaline flood the brain. The same thing happens when people are in an actual, physical fight. One study even showed a difference in physical arousal between a bloody version of "Mortal Kombat" (a fight-to-the-death game) and a version with the blood turned off.

• .

• Children who play violent video games experience an increase in aggressive actions. A 2000 study involving college students yielded interesting results. The study had two components: a session of video-game play, in which half the students played a violent video game and half played a non-violent video game, and then a simple reaction-time test that put two of the students in head-to-head competition. Whoever won the reaction-time test got to punish the loser with an audio blast. [color=6699FF]Of the students who won the reaction-time test, the ones who'd been playing a violent video game delivered longer, louder audio bursts to their opponents.
One of the most recent studies, conducted in 2006 at the Indiana University School of Medicine, went right to the source. Researchers scanned the brains of 44 kids immediately after they played video games. Half of the kids played "Need for Speed: Underground," an action racing game that doesn't have a violent component. The other half played "Medal of Honor: Frontline," an action game that includes violent first-person shooter activity (the game revolves around the player's point of view). [color=6699FF]The brain scans of the kids who played the violent game showed increased activity in the amygdala, which stimulates emotions, and decreased activity in the prefrontal lobe, which regulates inhibition, self-control and concentration. These activity changes didn't show up on the brain scans of the kids playing "Need for Speed



These findings are real.

The brain scan findings are emphatic.

A huge factor in acting out or avoiding violence is the brain center having to do with inhibition and self control. WHEN that brain center is functioning with a healthy focus, tendency, predisposition, habitual self-control and a healthy inhibiting of violent thoughts and urges, violence is at least less to non-existent.

WHEN that brain center has been moderated to functionally ‘turned down’ or even mostly off by any DIS-inhibiting conditioning, experiences, training, brainwashing, conditioning—then violent thoughts AND ACTIONS increase. [color=6699FF]!!!!DOH!!!!

On page 2 of the above article, David Walsh of the National Institute on Media and Family notes that some normally non-hostile tending children showed ‘REAL WORLD’ acting out GREATER than did their normally more aggressive cohorts.

The article notes that



“The Associated Press reported in March 2008 that video game sales—hardware and software combined—reached $1.33 billion in February [Source: NYT]. [color=6699FF]That’s for the month, not the quarter, and it’s 34 percent higher than January 2008 sales.


Imho, folks who believe ALL THAT results in NO INCREASE of violence potential and aggressive acting out . . . are just deluding themselves . . . at best.

= = = = = =

From

kotaku.com...

From Halo To Hot Sauce: What 25 Years Of Violent Video Game Research Looks Like
Jason Schreier

.



. . .

The results of this experiment—conducted by Ohio State University professor Brad Bushman not to measure brightness, as they had told the students, but to examine the connection between violent video games and aggressive behavior—were conclusive, the researchers said. The people who played violent video games were more likely to write more aggressive stories and dish out higher, more unpleasant noise. Violent video games, Bushman and his colleagues concluded, have a direct causal effect on aggression.

.

In other words, playing Call of Duty makes you want to fight.


. . . .

. . . As University of Toledo associate professor of psychology Jeanne Funk told the Los Angeles Times in one 1999 article: "We found signs that children who enjoy [violent] games can lose the emotional cues that trigger empathy."
. . .

On one side of the argument are Bushman, Anderson, and several other scientists who say there's a definitive causal link between games and aggressive behavior. Violent video games, this camp would argue, make people more aggressive.
.

"On average, the research shows that exposure to violent video games increases aggressive thoughts, it increases angry feelings, it increases physiological arousal such as heart rate and blood pressure, which may explain why it also increases aggressive behavior," Bushman told me in a phone interview. "It decreases helping behavior and it decreases feelings of empathy for others and the effects occur for males and females regardless of their age and regardless of where they live in the world."
. . .

"It looks like a pretty clear link," said Doug Gentile, a leading researcher in media violence who spoke to me on the phone last week. "Kids who play more violent video games—it changes their attitudes and their beliefs about aggression. It does desensitize them. It certainly hypes up aggressive feeling in the short-term. In the long-term it probably links aggression with fun, which is a really weird idea. Or aggression and relaxation, another weird idea."
. . .
In 2010, Bushman ran a meta-analysis called "VVG Effects on Aggression, Empathy, and Prosocial Behavior in Western and Eastern Countries: A Meta-Analytic Review." He and some colleagues studied results from something like 130,000 participants, concluding that there is indeed a link between violent video games and aggression.
. . .

. . . But we know that there is a link between playing violent video games and more common forms of aggressive behavior—such as getting in fights."
. . .
. . . We found that playing more hours a day of the two types of competitive games did predict aggression over time," Adachi told me over the phone

. . .

. . . Later, they were all tested. Polman and her colleagues found that players of the violent game were significantly more aggressive—at least in the short-term—than people who just watched it.
. . ..




That article gets into the issue of AGGRESSION vs VIOLENCE.

Aggression can be construed to be any hostile behavior, attitude, verbalization etc. while violence tends to be thought of as more narrowly defined as physical assaults of one sort or another.

{continued next post}




posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:13 PM
link   
kotaku.com...

From Halo To Hot Sauce: What 25 Years Of Violent Video Game Research Looks Like
Jason Schreier

. . .

The article notes that there’s not been much studied, if anything comparing the impacts of violent movies vs violent video games. There seems to be SOME increased hazard for those acting out violence as in video games vs watching a video game.

It sounds like the gaming industry as well as those partial to playing games and those who like to be extremely careful in their assertions . . . note that some of the research is not conclusive. Some of it gets at the issues in oblique ways that may or may not translate into applicability to daily life and gun or knife violence.

I think some of the criticisms of some of the research are reasonable points—to a point. I think, however, that they mostly side-step or delay or obfuscate the main issues. It’s like they dance all around the facts we know claiming that we don’t know enough to form any useful opinions until vastly more research is done.

I think that’s a grope. Actually, I think that's nonsense.

= = = = =


From:

www.pamf.org...

.
Violent Video Games and Aggressive Behaviors

.


. . .

Due to consumer demand over the last three decades, most video games produced and sold today are violent. Today's sophisticated video games require players to pay constant attention to the game as compared to passively watching television or a movie. As active participants in the game's script players strongly identify with violent characters portrayed in violent video games. This identification with characters in video games increases a player's ability to learn and retain aggressive thoughts and behaviors they see portrayed in violent games (Anderson et. al.).

Further research has suggested that exposure to violent video games may increase angry and hostile feelings while interacting with peers, teachers, and adults (Anderson et. al.) Violent video game exposure may decrease compassionate feelings for others with whom they interact (Anderson, et al).


In addition, the National Television Violence Study (1996) determined that 73 percent of violent video games reward violence as an effective way to handle conflict. Studies conducted by Bandura and Berkowitz have found that rewarding violent behavior is conducive to learning. As a result, players who are continually rewarded for violent responses may experience an increase in their aggressive behavior and/or their perception of aggressive behavior (Bandura, 1977; Berkowitz, 1993).


.
= = = = = =
. . .
Here are a few of the APA's recommendations and findings:

• Violent behavior is learned, often early in a child's life.
• Children learn to behave by watching people around them and by observing characters in movies, video games and television.
• Violent media increases mean-spirited behavior and may cause fear, mistrust, and fear; including nightmares.
• The APA recommends monitoring media consumption. The APA recommends that parents discuss media with their children.
• The APA advocates a reduction of violence in video games and interactive media.
• The APA recommends increasing the public's awareness regarding the potential impact playing violent video games may have on player's aggressive behavior as indicated in both short and long term research studies.
• Parents should use the Entertainment System Rating Board (ESRB) rating system to evaluate media their children would like to watch or purchase.
.

actagainstviolence.apa.org...




From:

www.apa.org...


.


. . .
Continued next post.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:13 PM
link   
kotaku.com...

From Halo To Hot Sauce: What 25 Years Of Violent Video Game Research Looks Like
Jason Schreier

. . .

The article notes that there’s not been much studied, if anything comparing the impacts of violent movies vs violent video games. There seems to be SOME increased hazard for those acting out violence as in video games vs watching a video game.

It sounds like the gaming industry as well as those partial to playing games and those who like to be extremely careful in their assertions . . . note that some of the research is not conclusive. Some of it gets at the issues in oblique ways that may or may not translate into applicability to daily life and gun or knife violence.

I think some of the criticisms of some of the research are reasonable points—to a point. I think, however, that they mostly side-step or delay or obfuscate the main issues. It’s like they dance all around the facts we know claiming that we don’t know enough to form any useful opinions until vastly more research is done.

I think that’s a grope. Actually, I think that's nonsense.

= = = = =


From:

www.pamf.org...

.
Violent Video Games and Aggressive Behaviors

.


. . .

Due to consumer demand over the last three decades, most video games produced and sold today are violent. Today's sophisticated video games require players to pay constant attention to the game as compared to passively watching television or a movie. As active participants in the game's script players strongly identify with violent characters portrayed in violent video games. This identification with characters in video games increases a player's ability to learn and retain aggressive thoughts and behaviors they see portrayed in violent games (Anderson et. al.).

Further research has suggested that exposure to violent video games may increase angry and hostile feelings while interacting with peers, teachers, and adults (Anderson et. al.) Violent video game exposure may decrease compassionate feelings for others with whom they interact (Anderson, et al).


In addition, the National Television Violence Study (1996) determined that 73 percent of violent video games reward violence as an effective way to handle conflict. Studies conducted by Bandura and Berkowitz have found that rewarding violent behavior is conducive to learning. As a result, players who are continually rewarded for violent responses may experience an increase in their aggressive behavior and/or their perception of aggressive behavior (Bandura, 1977; Berkowitz, 1993).


.
= = = = = =
. . .
Here are a few of the APA's recommendations and findings:

• Violent behavior is learned, often early in a child's life.
• Children learn to behave by watching people around them and by observing characters in movies, video games and television.
• Violent media increases mean-spirited behavior and may cause fear, mistrust, and fear; including nightmares.
• The APA recommends monitoring media consumption. The APA recommends that parents discuss media with their children.
• The APA advocates a reduction of violence in video games and interactive media.
• The APA recommends increasing the public's awareness regarding the potential impact playing violent video games may have on player's aggressive behavior as indicated in both short and long term research studies.
• Parents should use the Entertainment System Rating Board (ESRB) rating system to evaluate media their children would like to watch or purchase.
.

actagainstviolence.apa.org...




From:

www.apa.org...


.


. . .
Continued next post.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:20 PM
link   
From:

www.apa.org...

.
Early Exposure to TV Violence Predicts Aggression in Adulthood
Huesmann, L. R., Moise-Titus, J., Podolski, C., & Eron, L. D. (2003). Longitudinal relations between children’s exposure to TV violence and their aggressive and violent behavior in young adulthood: 1977-1992. Developmental Psychology, 39, 201-221.

.

.


. . .

This study is a follow-up of the 3-year longitudinal study conducted by Huesmann and his colleagues in 1977. In the original study, which included 557 children from five countries (aged 6-10 years), researchers gathered information on childhood TV-violence viewing, identification with aggressive TV characters, judgments of realism of TV violence, aggressive behavior, and intellectual ability, as well as parents’ socioeconomic status (measured by educational level), aggressiveness, parenting practices and attitudes, and parent’s TV usage (i.e., TV-viewing frequency and TV-violence viewing).

.

In this follow-up study, researchers interviewed and gathered collateral data (i.e., archival records and interviews of spouses and friends) on 329 participants from the original sample. At the time of the follow-up, the participants ranged in age from 20 to 25 years. Researchers administered measures of adult TV-violence viewing and adult aggressive behavior, and obtained archival data on criminal conviction and moving violation records from state records.
.
What did the study find?

.

The results of this study revealed that early childhood exposure to TV violence predicted aggressive behavior for both males and females in adulthood. Additionally, identification with same sex aggressive TV characters, as well as participants’ ratings of perceived realism of TV violence, also predicted adult aggression in both males and females. Furthermore, while a positive relationship was found between early aggression and subsequent TV violence viewing, the effect was not significant. These findings suggest that, while aggressive children may choose to watch more violent TV programming, it is more plausible that early childhood exposure to TV violence stimulates increases in aggression later in adulthood.
.

Gender differences were also observed in the expression of aggression. Specifically, men were more likely to engage in serious physical aggression and criminality, whereas women were more likely to engage in forms of indirect aggression. Men and women reported similar frequencies of engaging in verbal aggression, general aggression, and aggression toward spouses. For men, the effects were exacerbated by their identification with same sex characters and perceptions of realism in TV violence.

.
. . .




.

I think the longitudinal structure and design of this study offers an excellent and solid perspective on the violence issue.

And, the measures were not just laboratory set-ups. The study actually looked at real-life aggression and violence from verbal to criminal.

I realize this study is not about video games. However, I think the implications are clear enough.

[color=6699FF]GIGO REIGNS

GARBAGE IN, GARBAGE OUT.

Imho, it is impossible to sort of force feed thousands of hours of violence memes, themes, actions, values to kids—essentially K-16—and expect NO IMPACT of a violent or aggressive nature in their relationship. To me, that’s just plain ignorant, stupid, dumb.

NO WHERE ELSE in life or in relationships do we think that such massive and such intense influences over decades will have NO impact.

{continued next post}

.
edit on 23/1/2013 by BO XIAN because: center tag not working. gave up



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:36 PM
link   
FROM:


www.education.com...\

.

EDUCATION.COM

FAQs on Violent Video Games and Other Media Violence

.
By Craig A. Anderson, Ph.D.
Video Game Special Edition Contributor

.


.




. . .
Most of the early research focused on two questions:
.
1. Is there a significant association between exposure to media violence and aggressive behavior?
.
2. Is this association causal? (That is, can we say that violent television, video games, and other media are directly causing aggressive behavior in our kids?)
.

The results, overall, have been fairly consistent across types of studies (experimental, cross-sectional, and longitudinal) and across visual media type (television, films, video games). There is a significant relation between exposure to media violence and aggressive behavior. Exposing children and adolescents (or “youth”) to violent visual media increases the likelihood that they will engage in physical aggression against another person. By “physical aggression” we mean behavior that is intended to harm another person physically, such as hitting with a fist or some object. [color=6699FF]A single brief exposure to violent media can increase aggression in the immediate situation. Repeated exposure leads to general increases in aggressiveness over time. This relation between media violence and aggressive behavior is causal. {BX emphasis added}
.

Based on five decades of research on television and film violence and one decade of research on video games, we now have a pretty clear picture of how exposure to media violence can increase aggression in both the immediate situation as well as in long term contexts. Immediately after consuming some media violence, there is an increase in aggressive behavior tendencies because of several factors.
.

1. Aggressive thoughts increase, which in turn increase the likelihood that a mild or ambiguous provocation will be interpreted in a hostile fashion.
2. Aggressive (or hostile) emotion increases.
3. General arousal (e.g., heart rate) increases, which tends to increase the dominant behavioral tendency.
4. Youth learn new forms of aggressive behaviors by observing them, and will reenact them almost immediately afterwards if the situational context is sufficiently similar.




The article notes that the research is beginning to show that video games tend to result in a “bigger effects of violent video games.”

[color=6699FF]THIS IS A QUALITY ARTICLE WELL WORTH READING in its entirety at the link. There are many solid facts presented that are worth carefully pondering.


Personally, I would love to be able to have every parent, congress critter and media/gaming executive read that article.
.

I’m getting tired so I think I’ll stop here and try and pick this up again tomorrow evening.

I think there’s quite a bit of food for thought here already.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:41 PM
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After all that ....


Its a GAME....

NOT REAL LIFE

I am a grown man If I choose to slay a dragon or snipe an opponent...

ITS A GAME...

I don't need you replacing my entertainment with what you think I should be entertained with thank you.

For some reason going around playing my little pony and making things smile with rainbows dosen't seem too entertaining.

Do you see me peeking in your _....
edit on 23-1-2013 by Zaanny because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:56 PM
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reply to post by Zaanny
 


My dooooodness!

Where have I suggested authoritarian solutions?

It is a complex problem that will not be solved this side of Armageddon.

The globalist oligarchy will INSURE that the violence games and media continue and escalate . . . and that they will be available . . . until perhaps, they are more overtly solidly in control and martial law is implemented. THEN, they might outlaw them. Can't have the violence threaten THEIR status, you know.

They WILL insure that the daily life in tangible FACE TO FACE reality will end up WORSE than most video games. So, if you like the game--stay tuned, . . . coming soon to a neighborhood near to most global citizens . . . the real live thing--face to bloody face.


But far be it from me to hinder folks being complicit puppets to their violent conditioning, brain washing, mind control stuff. I'm sure it will end up helping their UN Agenda 21 considerably.

BTW, I see you wisely have not attempted to counter any of the solid research points. Nice that your gaming has evidently left you, so far, still with the capacity to think.

.
edit on 23/1/2013 by BO XIAN because: an addition



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:59 PM
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Have you ever had a snot nosed 12 year old kid laugh at you and call you names after they kill you with a noob tube? You would be angry too!

All kidding aside, have you ever thought that maybe video games are the one escape from an otherwise #ty life? Mom and Dad are scum. Maybe drinkers. Sister is pregnant. Nobody cares if he is failing school or not.

I guess what I really mean to say is lets take a look at parents and the child's home life before we start blaming video games.

I was reading about the 15 year old that killed his family and planned a mass shooting in Walmart and the article felt it necessary to point out that the kid was homeschooled and went to church every Sunday. Something other than video games triggered his rage.

When I was 15 I was playing violent video games. I was also playing varsity sports in high school and dating girls and hunting and fishing with my Dad. I had more than enough access to guns. Never did I feel the need to turn one on another human after playing GTA3.
edit on 24-1-2013 by olliemc84 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by Zaanny
After all that ....


Its a GAME....

NOT REAL LIFE

I am a grown man If I choose to slay a dragon or snipe an opponent...

ITS A GAME...



Once more with feeling . . .

If the following sentences are too complex, please let me know and I'll try and simplify them:

KEY PARTS OF THE BRAIN DO NOT DISTINGUISH BETWEEN FANTASY AND TANGIBLE REAL LIFE EVENTS in terms of the perceptions of and responses to the violence. I believe that is particularly likely to be true with folks who have significant degrees of ATTACHMENT DISORDER--wherein the part of the brain that manages emotions and emotional expression along with the part of the brain that handles relationships--is BRAIN DAMAGED.

However, just as dreams and hypnosis can demonstrate that some parts of the brain EQUATE fantasy, fiction with reality IN TERMS OF THE BRAIN LEVEL RESPONSES--video games and media have ESSENTIALLY quite similar to identical impacts on the brain as do tangible real life events. The difference is more slightly in degree than in type.

You are refusing to deal with that fact.

.
edit on 24/1/2013 by BO XIAN because: addition



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:06 AM
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reply to post by olliemc84
 


I just noted that it's a complex problem.

I contend that the New Mexico kid--for all the wonderful things the father did--somehow, the father still failed with his own son. I have read no evidence of that. I don't need to. The actions of the son demonstrate that.

Sons WITHOUT significant ATTACHMENT DISORDER do NOT do such things with or without video games.

Part of me wonders if the father was so busy saving the world he lost his own son.

Lots of Bible greats did that, to their shame--often deadly shame.

NEVERTHELESS, the impact of video games IS FAR FROM HELPING! [color=6699FF]DECREASE violence! !!!DOH!!!



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by BO XIAN
 


of course they do, and playing driving games leads to driving fast and watching horror movies numbs you to real violence, love movies and sex scences will drive you to lust more ect ect ect.

as far as kids go its about teaching them its fake
as far as adults go, its about teaching them its not real ^^ and when game is over its over.

not to go chase down some 13 year old that kicked your butt in so com and strangle him heh.

regardless of the product in question, any one toy can lead one to do things they normaly wouldnt

good example, completely smart people with high I.Q texting and driving and swerving all over the road doing it. all for a 3 second lol or biking with headphones on in downtown traffic. ^^



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:13 AM
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Originally posted by ~widowmaker~
reply to post by BO XIAN
 


of course they do, . . .


I have no idea what that refers to.

You made many good points that I agree with.

Thx for your kind reply.

Stupidity has no bounds in our era, it seems.

I'd love to have a reverse reader board on the front of my van so I could post in vivid green or some such letters:

HANG UP AND DRIVE!

NEVERTHELESS . . . Video games ARE a problem--a DELIBERATELY CREATED PROBLEM by the oligarchy that WANTS as much blood, gore, death, destruction--LITERALLY--WITH REAL BLOOD FLOWING--as they can cause.

And the ignorant stooges playing THEIR GAME WILL PAY dearly.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:18 AM
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Originally posted by ~widowmaker~
reply to post by BO XIAN
 


as far as kids go its about teaching them its fake
as far as adults go, its about teaching them its not real ^^ and when game is over its over.


Maybe you don't REALLY appreciate the FACT that . . .

--to a certain degree
--in certain respects
--particularly in certain contexts
--with certain cues

[color=6699FF] key parts of the BRAIN do NOT distinguish between what is fantasy and what is real.

--the emotions are close to identical
--the chemical responses in the brain and hormonal system are essentially identical
--the corrosive cortisol flooding the blood stream is essentially identical
--the emotional reflexes being built are essentially identical
.
etc. etc. etc.

You could [color=6699FF]TEACH that it was all fantasy until you were blue in the face--IT WOULD NOT CHANGE CERTAIN BRAIN LEVEL RESPONSES from being essentially identical . . . in some contexts, with some cues etc.

That's just the way the BRAIN IS STRUCTURED AND FUNCTIONS.

It HAS to function that way to avoid being bogged down in endless higher level functions, sorting, discriminating when there's little time for that.


. . .
.

edit on 24/1/2013 by BO XIAN because: (no reason given)
edit on 24/1/2013 by BO XIAN because: additions
edit on 24/1/2013 by BO XIAN because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:24 AM
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You state that this is "emphatic", which would lead me to think that I should be a violent person no? I should have tendencies towards violence? Studies like this need to provide results....results not based in science but based in dollars in my opinion (pick any other subject and that is what happens).

These are all subjective....



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:36 AM
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Originally posted by ownbestenemy
You state that this is "emphatic", which would lead me to think that I should be a violent person no?


Which part of this sentence is unclear?

"It's a complex problem."

Maybe this will help:

--MANY factors contribute to violence . . . particularly ATTACHMENT DISORDER . . . and a list of other factors.

HOWEVER, THE TOPIC OF THIS THREAD IS

THE

[color=6699FF]CONTRIBUTION

to violence and aggression that video games and other media [color=6699FF]are RESPONSIBLE FOR.

Y'all are refusing to deal with the issue of:

GIGO.

Whitewashing the evils involved won't sanitize them.

Putting lipstick on the pig will not help.

Pointing at various packs of straw dogs won't help.

Throwing dust in the air over a list of non-sequiturs won't help.



I should have tendencies towards violence?


That DEPENDS on a lot of factors--AMONG THEM--HOW MANY HOURS YOU SPENT/SPEND PLAYING VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES AT WHAT INTENSITY AND WHAT DEGREE OF EMOTIONAL INVOLVEMENT, IMMERSION.



Studies like this need to provide results....results not based in science but based in dollars in my opinion (pick any other subject and that is what happens).

These are all subjective....


You make it sound as though such studies are worthless. They are FAR FROM WORTHLESS.

Sigh.


Measuring with a micrometer is not ABSOLUTE TRUTH either. Sigh.

"These are all subjective" is not quite accurate.

There's a lot about the studies I cited that's NOT subjective.

.
edit on 24/1/2013 by BO XIAN because: additions



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:37 AM
link   
reply to post by BO XIAN
 


oh sorry , was saying of course they cause reactions, just like any product out there. how many rich people have smashed a ferrari just because they thought they were an f1 driver? hehe



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:40 AM
link   

Originally posted by ~widowmaker~
reply to post by BO XIAN
 


oh sorry , was saying of course they cause reactions, just like any product out there. how many rich people have smashed a ferrari just because they thought they were an f1 driver? hehe


THX THX THX.

INDEED. QUITE SO.

As Dr Murray Banks asserts in his youtube bit from 40 years ago . . . WHAT TO DO UNTIL THE PSYCHIATRIST COMES:

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS HUMAN BEHAVIOR WITHOUT A REASON.

And ONE of the reasons for violent behavior in our era on the part of MANY

is

violent video games, TV, movies.

GIGO.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:43 AM
link   
reply to post by olliemc84
 


"I guess what I really mean to say is lets take a look at parents and the child's home life before we start blaming video games."

im 34 years of age , play all kinds of games, some have been very violent. ive been in less fights than i can count on one hand and dont own any weapons. ive got a couple palm knives (boyscout/swiss) and they have touched no one elses blood but my own (ouchies)

i came from a decent background,

maybe its the combo of watching dad beat mom to a pulp and then watching the two of them swig down two thirty packs each thats the real problem ^^
edit on 24-1-2013 by ~widowmaker~ because: damn ferrets



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:50 AM
link   

Originally posted by BO XIAN
Which part of this sentence is unclear?

"It's a complex problem."

Maybe this will help:

--MANY factors contribute to violence . . . particularly ATTACHMENT DISORDER . . . and a list of other factors.


Agreed but you are reducing it down to "video games" and I see later you added TV and movies. So which is it? A complex problem with many factors or video games?


Y'all are refusing to deal with the issue of:

GIGO.

Whitewashing the evils involved won't sanitize them.

Putting lipstick on the pig will not help.

Pointing at various packs of straw dogs won't help.

Throwing dust in the air over a list of non-sequiturs won't help.


I am not refusing to deal with anything. While they may have a contributing factor in certain cases, it isn't the sole cause; which ironically you state isn't so, but yet are making a large case that it is; just not sure where you stand here.



That DEPENDS on a lot of factors--AMONG THEM--HOW MANY HOURS YOU SPENT/SPEND PLAYING VIOLENT VIDEO GAMES AT WHAT INTENSITY AND WHAT DEGREE OF EMOTIONAL INVOLVEMENT, IMMERSION.


Countless hours involved. From old-school to the new aged realistic life like games of today. Emotional involvement varies depending on how my day/week went. Maybe I am an anomaly to your thesis here.




You make it sound as though such studies are worthless. They are FAR FROM WORTHLESS.

Sigh.


"Sigh" indeed. Stating that the study is subjective doesn't deem it "worthless"; you have done that because you are being challenged. Stating that they are subjective allows others to actually critically think about what is going on with these "studies" (psychological and sociological studies are soft-science, wave in the wind, go with the flow, studies).


"These are all subjective" is not quite accurate.

Neither is your premise, but it seems you cannot handle an opposing view.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 01:08 AM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Nonsense.




I am not refusing to deal with anything.


That's not my observation.



While they may have a contributing factor in certain cases, it isn't the sole cause; which ironically you state isn't so,.



Really?

Where did I say that video games were the sole cause of anything?

I don't appreciate folks putting THEIR biases and assumptions in my fingers.

I've posted and responded with facts.

Folks have thrown back assumptions, biases, fantasies.

I've posted many studies . . . folks have thrown back opinions.

Yet you chide me about "subjective!"

Sheesh what a farce.

BTW, Physics is also SUBJECTIVE as physics itself has shown.

Straw dogs don't add to any hope of dialogue.





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