So I was just diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome

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posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:22 PM
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And I obviously don't know how to feel.

The signs and symptoms were there through my life, but everyone thought it was a phase and I would grow out of it. When I didn't, people started looking down on me, especially my family because they thought I was immature and unmotivated.

I did fairly well in school, placed in an advanced reading program in first grade, excelled in writing and language classes. Won both years of the National Geographic Geography Bee School level and went to state twice.

But then college came and then...I guess I hit a brick wall. I've tried my best, but yet struggled.

My parents used to yell at me, call me lazy and stupid and retard all through my life. But now they're acting more nice to me since the diagnosis.

Part of me curses myself for being born with such a disability, and wish it could have been caught earlier so I wouldn't be in such a predicament.

I have tried to research more, but I can't really get a grasp the notion that I had this problem.

Any thoughts, ATSers?




posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:29 PM
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I am immature and unmotivated, I don't have an excuse though. Your life shouldn't be any worse than before you were diagnosed, it should be better now you know why you have your symptoms, work towards improving your life by researching it.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by TheToastmanCometh
 


Everyone has traits they hate about themself and like. It doesn't matter what names you've been called or what label a doctor gives you. Just embrace who you are and always do the best you can in life. Set goals and achieve them. Inspire those around you. Be proud of your accomplishments you've already made and keep growing as a person.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by TheToastmanCometh
 


Dear TheToastmanCometh,

Nothing has changed, you are still you. Putting a name to it, doesn't change you. Asperger's is not a disease, it is just a way of seeing the world. Most people recognize 40,000 different facial expressions, it is claimed that people with Asperger's understand only 10,000. Blind people don't see any. You cannot blame how you act on your diagnosis, you make your decisions. What differentiates us from others, well, we tend to be too blunt and say what is on our minds, we can learn to be more diplomatic. We tend to not understand social cues, we can learn. Best of all, we tend to have some special ability, that is a good thing and we can put that to use. Peace.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:42 PM
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With every challenge comes a gift. Minimize your weaknesses and play to your strengths, and you will be fine.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:49 PM
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I wouldn't let it bother you. It has become an extremely popular diagnosis in recent times.

My user name is something that just crossed my mind when trying to come up with another one.... it isn't too terribly important, just a passing thought from some other chick on the internet who was only 20 and was SO DUMB and couldn't grasp very simple things, yet she was constantly picking on others very audaciously... and called me an aspie, but I knew right away that she thought it meant something else.

People confuse Aspergers with mild autism and it's actually very different. YES... I'm a weirdo, possibly a tad insane at times and have been labeled many things... diagnosed with more than one completely wrong label in my teens, but I am definitely Not an Aspie. Supposedly they like to be the center of attention and don't understand innuendos and unspoken gestures and things like that... somewhat histrionic in description. I never like to be the center of attention. Just because I use CAPSLOCK sometimes doesn't mean I am trying to be the center of attention in my life... ridiculous. I just like to ANNUNCIATE.


I think most people who get called that are actually not.

Doctors and therapists are constantly wanting to put colorful labels on everyone because it's what they do.

If they didn't... they would be out of a job.

Be what YOU aspire to be.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 12:02 AM
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reply to post by TheToastmanCometh
 


I disagree with the diagnosis, because I disagree with the very definition of the misunderstood condition.
Know that I am aware of the truth, that we are all equal and that:

Our brain pathway structure is a result of environmental sensory data encoded within a complex computer/neural network.

By taking control of what perceptions you choose to focus and encode into your neural pathways will allow you to transmute any negative environmental conditions into positive imprints.

Know that so called 'modern psychology, psychiatry, and pharmacology' are primitive at best in their limited understanding of the vast majority of supposed conditions. Risky and dangerous far too often, which is a serious matter of contention.

Within all of us resides the key to unlocking our own healing.
Not them, not anyone. Not for this type of quasi-psychological disorder (or is it something else like toxicity poisoning misdiagnosed??)

Who knows if this condition really even exists anyways? No one really knows for sure what the real explanations are for its emergence or potential mis-identification. There are plenty of theories that get debated on this, and have been for quite some time. Is it poisoning ? Is it genetic? Both? Other Causes?

I just take care of myself and just wait this one out till science catches up with reality and stops caring about money all of the time, which blinds their sight and limits their capabilities drastically.

But thats just what I understand, I'm not saying anyone else should believe me.
Read some nonfiction or even some fiction, it's always a good time.
I prefer nonfiction tho



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 12:09 AM
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Originally posted by TheToastmanCometh


But then college came and then...I guess I hit a brick wall. I've tried my best, but yet struggled.


Yep, there it is.

S/He didn't get indoctrinated and get his doctorate.

Guess we need to diagnose and possibly medicate this one.

Ye$$$.....

Red Flag Right Here
edit on 23-1-2013 by muzzleflash because: (no reason given)
edit on 23-1-2013 by muzzleflash because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 12:18 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Haah

thats a funny way to put it.

But as much as I don't want to be labeled or anything, I do believe that I have a disability.

Not taking the doctor's word totally, but just by the way I act, and that I match up with all the common traits of AS. And believe me, meeting me in person and reading what I type...much more eloquent when I do the latter.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 12:20 AM
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reply to post by TheToastmanCometh
 


was this before or after they tried to sell you tons of meds? ^^


have you gotten a second opinion?



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 12:32 AM
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reply to post by TheToastmanCometh
 


My dad has Aspergers. I'll tell you now, it's very hard on loved ones when they don't understand. The lack of emotion, love, sympathy or empathy is hard to accept. However, I'm the kind of individual who loves people for who they are... Unfortunately, none of my siblings or his first 6 kids from his first marriage are that way. Out of 10 children, he ended up with one who cares about him. He was married three times and all three marriages failed. I'm not saying this to discourage you. I'm telling you this because my dad was 76 when we figured it out. And we haven't had the heart to tell him. It has helped the family (including his sister) understand him better, and has made everyone else sort of step back and re-evaluate why they were so unhappy with him. Which has in turn created better relationships because the rest of the family realized what they thought was meeting my dad half-way...was far from how he saw things.
My dad learned social queues through watching others. If you didn't know what to look for, you wouldn't know he was different. In fact, my husband didn't believe me until I told him to watch my dads reaction when I told my dad thank you and that I loved him. It was absolutely obvious when my dad became uncomfortable and had to leave as quickly as possible.
Aspergers by no means makes him unlovable though. I just learned at an early age if I wanted to know my dad loved me, I had to ask for his love. That usually came in the form of asking to get lunch, or asking to help him with a project, or asking to sing while he played the piano. That is hard for anyone, but I love my dad fiercely, and always have. In fact, my mother and I barely speak because of the things she said and still says about my dad. Even though she is the one that figured out his Aspergers, she had too many years of heartbreak to forgive him. However it is just as much her as him.

Im saying all this because you are young....and you already know you think different - but there is nothing wrong with you! All that means is you find your niche. Find the areas in life where your genius thrives. And be open about Aspergers. Few people understand what it means. But one thing for sure...it means you are intelligent. It means you will learn what you need to survive in a world where people rely on "normal" social response. If you are open and learn all you can about the syndrome, you will understand it, and yourself...and be able to teach others.
The other reason I tell you all this is because you will find someone who loves you for you. For all your little quirks and focused genius. For your intelligence and ability to see things few others do.
It saddens me that Aspergers and autism are considered a syndrome. Yes, it means your brain is wired different. Yes it means you will have a harder time socializing and sympathizing. But it is societies fault for creating the image that we must all fit the mold. Be happy you don't. And surround yourself with those who don't care about differences or who understand who you are for who you are.
edit on 23-1-2013 by CeeRZ because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 12:41 AM
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reply to post by TheToastmanCometh
 
I have meet but a few with this disorder , they seem fine but do have an oddity about them , some just seem to have a "jump" others are well, attached to things, here is a web site that might, might not help, it is worth try, anything is better than nothing. www.aspergersyndrome.org... well after reading this www.aspergersyndrome.org... it seems i have as well, or could

The disorder can also include motor clumsiness and problems with handwriting and being hypersensitive to specific auditory and tactile experiences. There can also be problems with organisational and time management skills and explaining thoughts and ideas using speech.
but then who doesn't



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:01 AM
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Look into transcranial magnetic stimulation and John elder Robinson John elder Robinson he claims it nearly cured him, made it much more manageable



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:32 AM
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Thomas Jefferson had Aspergers too it appears

As well as Larry King and Bill Gates.

I have it too.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 04:21 AM
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Being 50 plus, I escaped the labelling, because, in those days, without diagnosis, we were just problem kids.

Still remember the word "DEFIANT" being used so regularly


Although I am eccentric (best way to describe it) I am me, and like yourself, the written words are finer than the spoken.

Life is what you make it, not what someone cares to label you with.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 04:45 AM
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Here is a quote from the Wikipedia Text (German) I translated:



The question of whether it is classified as a disease or as a normal variant of human information processing will be answered about both autism and Asperger's relatives as well as scientists and physicians inconsistently.


en.wikipedia.org...

Maybe you should talk to another doctor?

Meanwhile: Southpark A**burgers

www.southparkstudios.com...



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 04:56 AM
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Originally posted by TheToastmanCometh
And I obviously don't know how to feel.

The signs and symptoms were there through my life, but everyone thought it was a phase and I would grow out of it. When I didn't, people started looking down on me, especially my family because they thought I was immature and unmotivated.

I did fairly well in school, placed in an advanced reading program in first grade, excelled in writing and language classes. Won both years of the National Geographic Geography Bee School level and went to state twice.

But then college came and then...I guess I hit a brick wall. I've tried my best, but yet struggled.

My parents used to yell at me, call me lazy and stupid and retard all through my life. But now they're acting more nice to me since the diagnosis.

Part of me curses myself for being born with such a disability, and wish it could have been caught earlier so I wouldn't be in such a predicament.

I have tried to research more, but I can't really get a grasp the notion that I had this problem.

Any thoughts, ATSers?


Did you actually go to a certified MD for the diagnoses?

IF so.. did he refer you to someone else .. ?



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 05:15 AM
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Originally posted by NotAnAspie
Supposedly they like to be the center of attention and don't understand innuendos and unspoken gestures and things like that... somewhat histrionic in description. I never like to be the center of attention.


I personally think you may be thinking about another disorder.

Aspergers is the Polar opposite of Histrionic. In fact, the majority of people with Aspergers will go out of their way to not be the centre of attention.

You've either read or been given wrong information, or you know somebody who is as you described and has been misdiagnosed or is telling you porkies.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To the OP. I wanted to write something out but i think CeeRZ covered most of it and put it more eloquently then i could.

edit on 23-1-2013 by skitzspiricy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 05:28 AM
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Excellent, a free Hack the Pentagon with impunity ticket.....


I joke of course.....I hope you get a easier ride from your parents....Calling your Child a Retard is not in the ideal Parenting guide the last time i looked....



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 05:52 AM
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Originally posted by skitzspiricy

Originally posted by NotAnAspie
Supposedly they like to be the center of attention and don't understand innuendos and unspoken gestures and things like that... somewhat histrionic in description. I never like to be the center of attention.


I personally think you may be thinking about another disorder.

Aspergers is the Polar opposite of Histrionic. In fact, the majority of people with Aspergers will go out of their way to not be the centre of attention.

You've either read or been given wrong information, or you know somebody who is as you described and has been misdiagnosed or is telling you porkies.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To the OP. I wanted to write something out but i think CeeRZ covered most of it and put it more eloquently then i could.

edit on 23-1-2013 by skitzspiricy because: (no reason given)


No, I don't believe so... Histrionics and Aspergers can get cross diagnosed because some with Aspergers apparently will engage in behavior that resembles attention seeking.

Like they don't know when to be quiet when people show signs of wanting to change the subject.

Or going on for long periods of time about seemingly insignificant or over focusing on small details.

Or lack of empathy that tends to make some of them rather poor sports in social settings.

This is not saying it is the same as being an extrovert, because sure, some are introverts but their social awkwardness can apparently come off as histrionic because of their odd behavior.

Yes, if you look at some of the descriptions it is not hard to see how many adults would excuse all of that as attention seeking.

Their inability to understand nuances leads them to frustration when not "jiving" with a group.... like the sore loser syndrome when they don't "get" why their behavior is suddenly being quelled.

What you need to realize is that most cases of Aspergers are diagnosed as children... and many children are blamed as being histrionic simply for being children.

I didn't draw the parallels in the books, some in the psychiatric community do.

Not to mention the fact that there are so many blurry opinions on a syndrome that some believe doesn't even exist... it gives plenty of room for all sorts of interpretation... which is why most webpages you pull up on it will still claim it's related to Autism, but many experts swear up and down that this is not true... but that falls in line with the OVER diagnosis of Autism. These days... anyone who is slightly weird can get diagnosed with autism and if you look at the statistics, it is clearly over diagnosed.... that is because the guidelines have become extremely loose for autism.

There is a kid i know who was put on strong meds for ADHD... well somebody starting implementing the idea that he was mildly autistic because when he would get mad for being scolded, he would avert his eyes away from he person scolding him... which is also conveniently mentioned in aspergers... yet again blurring disorders and merging them... when none of them really have clear definitions.

when you see a person with a true organic brain disease stemming from childhood, many of them CANNOT look directly at you. they could be standing right in front of you, smiling...as if WANTING to look at you but their eyes seem to be permanently fixed to one side... stuck that way. THAT is the eye aversion in true autism.

that is just one example of how these things happens.

What you are talking about is the simple characteristic of being an introvert...which could fall in the lines of many different diagnosis... just as being an extrovert is.

I'm just telling you what i have read from books before even encountering the internet and all these web interpretations... the same ones who claim it is mild autism.

aspergers are classically defined as socially awkward and this gives rise to some symptoms of attention seeking.

and you know what? THEIR USUALLY KIDS... so it probably IS attention seeking in many cases... psychiatrically defined as a mental disorder so they can shove meds down the kids throat.

edit on 23-1-2013 by NotAnAspie because: (no reason given)





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