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Scientists estimate 100,000 Iraqi deaths since invasion.

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posted on Oct, 28 2004 @ 11:47 AM
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What are we to believe??
I am not talking about deaths within the 'Coalition of the Willing'.


There is no official figure for the number of Iraqis killed since the conflict began, but some non-governmental estimates range from 10,000 to 30,000. As of Wednesday, 1,081 U.S. servicemen had been killed, according to the U.S. Defense Department.

The researchers of The Lancet report concede that the data they based their projections on were of "limited precision," because the quality of the information depends on the accuracy of the household interviews used for the study. The interviewers were Iraqi, most of them doctors.

abcnews.go.com...

Sanc'.




posted on Oct, 28 2004 @ 12:09 PM
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What I find interesting is that at the end of the article, they call on the Red Cross or another body to confirm or infirm this number.

Whatever the number of casualties is, this is something we need to do - get a realistic picture of how many died. We owe that to the Iraqi people, if we really do pretend to care about them.



posted on Oct, 28 2004 @ 12:21 PM
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Originally posted by Otts
Whatever the number of casualties is, this is something we need to do - get a realistic picture of how many died. We owe that to the Iraqi people, if we really do pretend to care about them.


True, but it's sort of hard to get accurate information about anything in a country where a banner of neutrality doesn't mean a whole lot to the guys with guns.



posted on Oct, 29 2004 @ 01:58 PM
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These are results published by The Lancet, a well respected medical publication.
I'm cut/pasting the article as the site search is reg' req'. (PDF link at bottom)


Mortality before and after the 2003 invasion of Iraq: cluster sample survey
Les Roberts, Riyadh Lafta, Richard Garfield, Jamal Khudhairi, Gilbert Burnham

Summary

Background In March, 2003, military forces, mainly from the USA and the UK, invaded Iraq. We did a survey to compare mortality during the period of 146 months before the invasion with the 178 months after it.

Methods A cluster sample survey was undertaken throughout Iraq during September, 2004. 33 clusters of 30 households each were interviewed about household composition, births, and deaths since January, 2002. In those households reporting deaths, the date, cause, and circumstances of violent deaths were recorded. We assessed the relative risk of death associated with the 2003 invasion and occupation by comparing mortality in the 178 months after the invasion with the 146-month period preceding it.

Findings The risk of death was estimated to be 25-fold (95% CI 16-42) higher after the invasion when compared with the preinvasion period. Two-thirds of all violent deaths were reported in one cluster in the city of Falluja. If we exclude the Falluja data, the risk of death is 15-fold (11-23) higher after the invasion. We estimate that 98000 more deaths than expected (8000-194000) happened after the invasion outside of Falluja and far more if the outlier Falluja cluster is included. The major causes of death before the invasion were myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accidents, and other chronic disorders whereas after the invasion violence was the primary cause of death. Violent deaths were widespread, reported in 15 of 33 clusters, and were mainly attributed to coalition forces. Most individuals reportedly killed by coalition forces were women and children. The risk of death from violence in the period after the invasion was 58 times higher (95% CI 81-419) than in the period before the war.

Interpretation Making conservative assumptions, we think that about 100000 excess deaths, or more have happened since the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Violence accounted for most of the excess deaths and air strikes from coalition forces accounted for most violent deaths. We have shown that collection of public-health information is possible even during periods of extreme violence. Our results need further verification and should lead to changes to reduce non-combatant deaths from air strikes.


from www.thelancet.com...

PDF, image.thelancet.com... (264kb)

Sanc'.



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