Flawed Human vs. Pure Human

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posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 09:46 PM
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Aleister Crawley has a motto “Do as you will.” This means bringing your desires into reality, which I think is the main purpose of being a pure human, especially if your desires are pure.

But no one is perfect. Believing that you are correct about an issue without being able to look at particular situations is the choice that makes you unable to find the correct path because you are blinded by a belief and not looking at reality. This inhibits the main purpose of being a pure human, and is the main cause of being a flawed human.




posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 09:49 PM
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reply to post by darkbake
 


I got 20 on the flawed human in the 3rd round!



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 09:49 PM
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reply to post by Manunnaki
 


Explain, this sounds fun.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by Manunnaki
 


Ima taker, pure human stops him in the 5th.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by darkbake
 


flawed human = pure (true) human.
human = flawed



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:09 PM
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reply to post by darkbake
 


Dare ye mention Crowley on ATS?!?



I smell Christians with pitchforks and torches approaching! *hides*

edit on 22-1-2013 by Akragon because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by darkbake
 



Do as you will.


Wouldn't doing the opposite—do not as you will—also be considered 'doing as you will.' I think resisting the animalistic instants and becoming ascetic is what the human does, and therefor, is always pure human. Human is what human is. Look in the mirror. Our facades are a part of us.

We 'do as we will' everyday. Crowley unnecessarily made a principle out of it. The idea of a 'pure human' is merely another ideal, and as such, unattainable.

-LesMis
edit on 22-1-2013 by LesMisanthrope because: just a mess



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:22 PM
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reply to post by Akragon
 


Ha ha ha! So true.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:22 PM
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Originally posted by LesMisanthrope
reply to post by darkbake
 



Do as you will.


Wouldn't doing the opposite—do not as you will—also be considered 'doing as you will.' I think resisting the animalistic instants and becoming ascetic is what the human does, and therefor, is always pure human. Human is what human is. Look in the mirror. Our facades are a part of us.

We 'do as we will' everyday. Crowley unnecessarily made a principle out of it. The idea of a 'pure human' another is merely another ideal, and as such, unattainable.

-LesMis


Well, I think Crawley meant WILL as in willpower. It is actually the opposite of the will you meant - it is resisting mundane, repetitive activities and creating something. Interesting how they have the same name, but are opposites.
edit on 22-1-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)
edit on 22-1-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)
edit on 22-1-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by darkbake
 


Do you think desire is of the free will that they sell us? or the will of the bodily instincts?



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:25 PM
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reply to post by LesMisanthrope
 


We were both thinking the same thing at the same time, interesting. I don't actually think free will being used positively is being sold to us very often -

I was under the impression that the opposite was true, either no control of our actions (some Atheism) or that free will was given to us so that we could sin (Christianity).
edit on 22-1-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by darkbake
 

Both would have to be the same thing it would seem.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:29 PM
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reply to post by LesMisanthrope
 


Not in my case... I either "do as I will" and just go about my day without thinking about things, you know, reacting, or I "do as I will" and I make a goal for myself and accomplish it. In my life at least, they result in different behaviors and outcomes.

I like sitting down and making a list or engaging in positive problem-solving.
edit on 22-1-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 11:04 PM
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reply to post by darkbake
 


The following is excerpted directly from Crowley's Book of the Law, in chapter III: The Law of Thelema:


This book lays down a simple code of conduct.

"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law."
"Love is the Law, love under will."
"There is no law beyond Do what thou wilt."

This means that each of us stars is to move on our true orbit, as marked out by the nature of our position, the law of our growth, the impulse of our past experiences. All events are equally lawful—and every one necessary in the long run—for all of us, in theory; but in practice, only one act is lawful for each of us at any given moment. Therefore Duty consists in determining to experience the right event from one moment of consciousness to another.

Each action or motion is an act of love, the uniting with one or another part of "Nuit;" each such act must be "under will," chosen so as to fulfill and not to thwart the true nature of the being concerned.

The technical methods to achieving this are to be studied in "Magick," or acquired by personal instruction from the Master Therion and his appointed assistants.


What Crowley meant was not that the manifestation of desire was the end goal. The real goal was discovering one's personal place in the universe, here referred to as Nuit, the ancient Egyptian goddess of the starry heaven. It was Crowley's belief that every human being had the potential to shape their own universe, or at least their perception of it, through personal mastery of their Will through the processes of Magick. This is why the Book of the Law opens with the phrase:


Had! The manifestation of Nuit.
The unveiling of the company of Heaven.
Every man and every woman is a star.


We are all universal essences. Now, whether Crowley lived by the Law he preached... is arguable. I think he eventually succumbed to his ego-self, and let the notoriety of his persona get the better of him. Which is probably why people misinterpret his "motto" as a free-for-all where all desire is up for grabs. The unfortunate truth being that the goal of Thelma was far different from what it's founder, the Master Therion, eventually muddied himself into.

As for flawed and pure humans, there's no denying that we are all flawed, as are all things from nature. Nature is not perfect, but it is ever-striving toward a state of perfection. Which is why evolution (of both the biological and spiritual sort) is so very important to us as human beings. To know we're neither made perfect, nor act in perfect love, is a good thing. It gives us a driving motivation to ever improve upon who we are, and were.

~ Wandering Scribe

edit on 23/1/13 by Wandering Scribe because: correcting some code





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