Most Dangerous Science-Related Toy Ever!

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posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 08:58 PM
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wow, what a crime.

a toy that makes kids use their brain and puts a foothold in the door of understanding the secrets of atomic energy and the splitting of the atom.

better just stick them in front of the t.v. and get radiation from that than a harmless toy.




posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:30 PM
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Lol nice avatar pic.
2nd

GS



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:40 PM
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Awesome atomic lab kits. I want one. This kid could have used one.




People who want to know more about the nuclear boy scout can look here...

YouTube



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 12:28 AM
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Ahh the good ol' days. Where if Billy radiates his neighborhood, it'll toughen the boy up.
I wonder what this generations "WTF were they thinking giving that to children" toy will be.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 01:08 AM
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This is cool. All we got to do in school Biology was stitch body parts from several dead people together and figure out how to make it live.

I think we created a Californian



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 02:59 AM
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well hell, all this hoopla about iran making their own, why they hell didnt they just buy these kits ^^


so , was this on the shelf next to , make your own agent orange and how to build your own land mine?



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 07:14 PM
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People use to buy radioactive products because I suppose they thought it was healthy. Radium water, lotion and all types of stuff.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 12:29 AM
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Originally posted by thudpuddy
Never mind this stupid stuff ; where's my home genetic engineering kit ? I am still waiting .

Actually mildly radioactive stuff has always been pretty much ignored , even uranium is harmless (relatively) without some very expensive equipment to refine it .



As far as a home GE kit goes, you could Google this. Start with extracting DNA, then the PCR reaction, then you could start doing a little analysis. You'd be surprised how easy it is to do. You'd probably need to buy a bit of equipment to do it right, but that's not a big issue.

Also, when I was at high school they found a large wooden box at the top of a cupboard in the science staff room. It turns out that the box contained "radiological samples" including a fuel rod from the Lucas Heights reactor. My science teacher had been sitting there, within about six feet of the box for over two years, eating his lunch!



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 01:17 AM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 


Over to the local college, we did some of the high school "ap" chemistry in the college's chem lab, where there was a five gallon jug of 20 year old picric acid we found under the bottom shelf while the instructor was away, while we were scouting the supply room for raw materials. Mostly because our high school was a metal building sort of like a big grocery store and wasn't good for much past mixing vinegar and baking soda.

Being the budding mad bomber I later turned to be professionally, I recall looking at it and going "Cool! Five # gallons of picric acid! Explosives ALL SUMMER!", then I looked at the date "What? 1956?!" and looked in the bottom - brightly colored crystals from the metal cap that had somewhat corroded and fallen into the acid, ionically contaminating it.

I crawled my big butt out of there very slowly and said "Go tell the security guard to get the state police on the phone, y'all get out of here"

It was exciting, they got the state bomb squad out and extracted it, took it outside to a big field and shot it. It was magnificent, but not as much as it would have been if we'd gotten a clean jug of it. Picric acid is the starting point for many a very good explosive.

Speaking of which, United Nuclear. Guys, this is a seriously cool store, and I have bought stuff from him - notably I gave out chunks of trinitite for stocking stuffers last year - BUT. And this is a big but. They worry me.

I hate to say it. But they do, and they worry me two different ways. One, while I can't prove it, I'm pretty sure Lazar was Agency. That's no biggie in itself. But it relates to the second worry. UN has the trappings of a honeypot. Yes, a lot of the stuff is innocuous. That's often true of honeypots, too. But if you know your stuff, ol' Bob, well, the selection of chemical reagents he sells is seductively tailored towards producing a half-dozen of the more favored military explosives. It's like you took a laundry list of "what do I need to make RDX, both main methods" and put it on the site. Also HMX and a couple of others. Along with the ancillary bits and pieces. You could make you a big kit for doing the amino synthesis of RDX in a big one stop shop, right there at UN.

I don't see that as being an accident. Hell, I can't order all that stuff at any one MAJOR chemical supplier. It's some here, some there. But Bob's got it all. For HMX, PETN and a couple of others you don't use a lot, too.

I have to scratch my head and wonder - do I order the right combo and get a free visit from the Feds, or what?

Now, back in 2004 I found two DOE honeypots by accident, and they looked a lot like this. For instance, there was a page at a well-known supplier, they also supply stuff to LANL and Sandia. And if you went to their page looking for lithium, you could find lithium hydride. Not abnormal. They had lithium in a variety of forms, in bulk. But nothing odd. If, however, you specifically searched for it, you were presented a page that did NOT show up in the product index. They had a page for bulk Li6D. Not lithium hydride, technical Li6D. And at a bargain basement price, too. I had also found a site where a major manufacturer of refined metals, who has a sideline in making slappers for nukes, if you searched just right, you'd end up on a page where you could buy slappers with a Visa or MC. I reported them both and found out they were honeypots. You order that, and the mailman that asks you to sign for it is a non-postal Fed, and you go answer hard questions for a while.



posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 01:47 AM
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Dang. All this stuff beats the crap out of mercury. Our teacher had a big jar of mercury and gave us all a blob of it to roll around in our hands so we could be amazed by the liquid metal.



posted on Jan, 26 2013 @ 02:22 AM
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Originally posted by XXX777
Dang. All this stuff beats the crap out of mercury. Our teacher had a big jar of mercury and gave us all a blob of it to roll around in our hands so we could be amazed by the liquid metal.


Did you notice how the big drop of Mercury keeps getting smaller & smaller even if you don't drop it?

Weird, eh?

... and you could start a fashion for pale bald and toothless after, I suspect.



posted on Jan, 26 2013 @ 02:25 AM
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Originally posted by Bedlam
reply to post by chr0naut
 


Over to the local college, we did some of the high school "ap" chemistry in the college's chem lab, where there was a five gallon jug of 20 year old picric acid we found under the bottom shelf while the instructor was away, while we were scouting the supply room for raw materials. Mostly because our high school was a metal building sort of like a big grocery store and wasn't good for much past mixing vinegar and baking soda.

Being the budding mad bomber I later turned to be professionally, I recall looking at it and going "Cool! Five # gallons of picric acid! Explosives ALL SUMMER!", then I looked at the date "What? 1956?!" and looked in the bottom - brightly colored crystals from the metal cap that had somewhat corroded and fallen into the acid, ionically contaminating it.

I crawled my big butt out of there very slowly and said "Go tell the security guard to get the state police on the phone, y'all get out of here"

It was exciting, they got the state bomb squad out and extracted it, took it outside to a big field and shot it. It was magnificent, but not as much as it would have been if we'd gotten a clean jug of it. Picric acid is the starting point for many a very good explosive.

Speaking of which, United Nuclear. Guys, this is a seriously cool store, and I have bought stuff from him - notably I gave out chunks of trinitite for stocking stuffers last year - BUT. And this is a big but. They worry me.

I hate to say it. But they do, and they worry me two different ways. One, while I can't prove it, I'm pretty sure Lazar was Agency. That's no biggie in itself. But it relates to the second worry. UN has the trappings of a honeypot. Yes, a lot of the stuff is innocuous. That's often true of honeypots, too. But if you know your stuff, ol' Bob, well, the selection of chemical reagents he sells is seductively tailored towards producing a half-dozen of the more favored military explosives. It's like you took a laundry list of "what do I need to make RDX, both main methods" and put it on the site. Also HMX and a couple of others. Along with the ancillary bits and pieces. You could make you a big kit for doing the amino synthesis of RDX in a big one stop shop, right there at UN.

I don't see that as being an accident. Hell, I can't order all that stuff at any one MAJOR chemical supplier. It's some here, some there. But Bob's got it all. For HMX, PETN and a couple of others you don't use a lot, too.

I have to scratch my head and wonder - do I order the right combo and get a free visit from the Feds, or what?

Now, back in 2004 I found two DOE honeypots by accident, and they looked a lot like this. For instance, there was a page at a well-known supplier, they also supply stuff to LANL and Sandia. And if you went to their page looking for lithium, you could find lithium hydride. Not abnormal. They had lithium in a variety of forms, in bulk. But nothing odd. If, however, you specifically searched for it, you were presented a page that did NOT show up in the product index. They had a page for bulk Li6D. Not lithium hydride, technical Li6D. And at a bargain basement price, too. I had also found a site where a major manufacturer of refined metals, who has a sideline in making slappers for nukes, if you searched just right, you'd end up on a page where you could buy slappers with a Visa or MC. I reported them both and found out they were honeypots. You order that, and the mailman that asks you to sign for it is a non-postal Fed, and you go answer hard questions for a while.


Sometime I actually wonder if certain three letter agencies are advised by chemists and physicists?


Perhaps they are in this case.

edit on 26/1/2013 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)





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