Shark Skin in the Medical Field

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posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 01:08 AM
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Shark skin in the medical field

This is another case where man is learning from nature. They found that the design of the scales on sharks inhibits the growth of bacteria.

The Research
Using an impression taken from a live shark, Brennan found that the pattern of
Interlocking diamonds on the shark’s skin block bacteria and other growths.
Brennan engineered a “surface technology” comprised of billions of tiny, raised
Microscopic diamond shapes that mimic the height, width, length and curvature
of the sharkskin surface. His tests showed the sharkskin design surface is
effective at inhibiting the growth of Staph a, E. coli and other bacteria. The
patented surface, which Brennan calls Sharklet, can be applied as a plastic-like
film or incorporated into a manufactured metal part.
www.sharklet.com...

Hospitals and doctors office equipment in the future may have coatings that mimic shark skin. The US navy has done research on shark skin coatings for ship hulls to cut down on drag and barnacle growth.

www.abovetopsecret.com...&flagit=154586

The medical field has been interested in sharks for quite some time due to their resistance to cancer. It just goes to show that we still have much to learn from nature.
edit on 22-1-2013 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 01:41 AM
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Brilliant!

Now we just need to wait 100 years for it to actually be adopted as common practice among the medical fraternity and we're good to go.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 02:21 AM
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Originally posted by Grimpachi
Shark skin in the medical field

This is another case where man is learning from nature. They found that the design of the scales on sharks inhibits the growth of bacteria.

The Research
Using an impression taken from a live shark, Brennan found that the pattern of
Interlocking diamonds on the shark’s skin block bacteria and other growths.
Brennan engineered a “surface technology” comprised of billions of tiny, raised
Microscopic diamond shapes that mimic the height, width, length and curvature
of the sharkskin surface. His tests showed the sharkskin design surface is
effective at inhibiting the growth of Staph a, E. coli and other bacteria. The
patented surface, which Brennan calls Sharklet, can be applied as a plastic-like
film or incorporated into a manufactured metal part.
www.sharklet.com...

Hospitals and doctors office equipment in the future may have coatings that mimic shark skin. The US navy has done research on shark skin coatings for ship hulls to cut down on drag and barnacle growth.

www.abovetopsecret.com...&flagit=154586

The medical field has been interested in sharks for quite some time due to their resistance to cancer. It just goes to show that we still have much to learn from nature.
edit on 22-1-2013 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)


I remember reading or seeing this somewhere. Fascinating! It's about time they start waking up to the fact that nature is more experienced and crafty than man.





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