'Quadruple helix' DNA seen in human cells

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posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 10:37 AM
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Cambridge University scientists say they have seen four-stranded DNA at work in human cells for the first time. The famous "molecule of life", which carries our genetic code, is more familiar to us as a double helix. But researchers tell the journal Nature Chemistry that the "quadruple helix" is also present in our cells, and in ways that might possibly relate to cancer. They suggest that control of the structures could provide novel ways to fight the disease. "The existence of these structures may be loaded when the cell has a certain genotype or a certain dysfunctional state," said Prof Shankar Balasubramanian from Cambridge's department of chemistry. "We need to prove that; but if that is the case, targeting them with synthetic molecules could be an interesting way of selectively targeting those cells that have this dysfunction," he told BBC News.


Source

Who knows if its 2012 related but its an fascinating development either way.

Maybe.. maybe...




posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 10:49 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by AmberLeaf
 


But the timing of this discovery is interesting being just weeks after the apparent shift.

Most likely means nothing but you never know it might have been found now because it wasn't there before.



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 11:08 AM
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Thanks for this post! I knew about the double helix but it spurred me into some research - something new to look at before the daily grind.

Apparently they're talking that the quadruple helix could lead to new ways to fight cancer. Because it was found in cancer cells? And it seems to be only in the human genome.

With all of the people out there that report to be manipulated genetically by either our own government, visitors, or what have you I wonder where the silly thing came from.

And I thank you for this! I happen to be working on a literary project that deals with this very material. The information is very welcome.



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by android
 


A HeLa cell /ˈhiːlɑː/, also Hela or hela cell, is a cell type in an immortal cell line used in scientific research. It is the oldest and most commonly used human cell line.[1] The line was derived from cervical cancer cells taken on February 8, 1951[2] from Henrietta Lacks, a patient who eventually died of her cancer on October 4, 1951. The cell line was found to be remarkably durable and prolific as illustrated by its contamination of many other cell lines used in research.[3][4]

YEAH immortality wait noooooooooooooooooooooooooo i dont want to live forever in pain

an interesting fact: there are more of Ms lacks cells alive today then when Ms lacks was alive in 1951, 20 tons actually

I also heard somewhere that we evolved to die and that cancer was the primary reason for this evolution
edit on 21-1-2013 by digital01anarchy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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reply to post by digital01anarchy
 


You had me very excited there for a second!


Quality information though
edit on 21-1-2013 by android because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 06:15 PM
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Originally posted by digital01anarchy
I also heard somewhere that we evolved to die and that cancer was the primary reason for this evolution


We evolved just so we could die and cancer is the main reason for evolution? Ok, so what does cancer do when we're all dead then? Is it the next species or something? Can you explain what you mean more please? One of the most bizarre sentences, maybe the most bizarre sentence that I've ever seen on here!

I used to pride myself on accepting the chances of some of the most far out theories I thought possible, but you've really got me with that one.


Edit : do you mean the emergence of the cancer line is going to kill many of us off, but then in an evolved Human that line will work properly or something? So it's basically killing us until we evolve to accept it properly as a working part of a future form of Human?
edit on 21-1-2013 by robhines because: added



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 07:06 PM
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Originally posted by android
reply to post by AmberLeaf
 


But the timing of this discovery is interesting being just weeks after the apparent shift.

Most likely means nothing but you never know it might have been found now because it wasn't there before.


What apparent shift more to the point



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 07:14 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 07:29 PM
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Originally posted by robhines

Originally posted by digital01anarchy
I also heard somewhere that we evolved to die and that cancer was the primary reason for this evolution


We evolved just so we could die and cancer is the main reason for evolution? Ok, so what does cancer do when we're all dead then? Is it the next species or something? Can you explain what you mean more please?


Well first off cancer has no consciousness, so I doubt it's any next kind of species. Cancer is the name for uncontrollable, mutated cellular growth. A lot has to go wrong to get cancer.

I think what was meant is that there is no evolution without mutation. The end result of mutation is cancer, and evolution at the same time. One deals with the individual, and the other the species. So what is taken away from us all, is given to us yet to be. Life.

edit on 21-1-2013 by unityemissions because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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"Scientists say that CONTROL CONTROL CONTROL...."

Scientists are out of control.

I don't want scientists touching anyone's DNA, to be honest.

Leave it alone.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 12:54 AM
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Originally posted by android


Cambridge University scientists say they have seen four-stranded DNA at work in human cells for the first time. The famous "molecule of life", which carries our genetic code, is more familiar to us as a double helix. But researchers tell the journal Nature Chemistry that the "quadruple helix" is also present in our cells, and in ways that might possibly relate to cancer. They suggest that control of the structures could provide novel ways to fight the disease. "The existence of these structures may be loaded when the cell has a certain genotype or a certain dysfunctional state," said Prof Shankar Balasubramanian from Cambridge's department of chemistry. "We need to prove that; but if that is the case, targeting them with synthetic molecules could be an interesting way of selectively targeting those cells that have this dysfunction," he told BBC News.


Source

Who knows if its 2012 related but its an fascinating development either way.

Maybe.. maybe...


Yes, because cancer never existed prior to 2012. Will 2012 madness never end?



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 12:57 AM
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reply to post by android
 

A "double double"...cool. Are they still A, C, G and T strands?



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 01:17 AM
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Originally posted by spearcarrier
Apparently they're talking that the quadruple helix could lead to new ways to fight cancer. Because it was found in cancer cells?


I think they're trying to trick us into thinking the quadruple helix somehow causes cancer.

And they are going to save us by stopping it...



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 01:37 AM
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reply to post by NuclearPaul
 


Roll your eyes all you want, I'm sure in 10, 20 or 30 years if you end up on your deathbed with cancer and someone comes along and offers you a cure, you'll jump on it no questions asked.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 01:38 AM
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Originally posted by PnezakYahakotima
I don't want scientists touching anyone's DNA, to be honest.


That's fine, but I don't feel the same. Am I allowed to let scientists touch my DNA?



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 01:40 AM
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reply to post by robhines
 


I think the point he was trying to make was that we are a fragile species and we all have to die at some point, if the heart attack and strokes, the bacteria and viruses, the wildlife and the cars and everything else doesn't get you, cancer will.

Cancer is like nature's catch all killer, it will get to you eventually on a long enough timeline.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 02:40 AM
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Originally posted by NuclearPaul

Originally posted by spearcarrier
Apparently they're talking that the quadruple helix could lead to new ways to fight cancer. Because it was found in cancer cells?


I think they're trying to trick us into thinking the quadruple helix somehow causes cancer.

And they are going to save us by stopping it...


Then you need to read, so you won't have to "think" and instead will know. They flat out say the quad helix does not cause cancer. The cancer causes the quad helix.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 03:13 AM
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Originally posted by digital01anarchy
reply to post by android
 


A HeLa cell /ˈhiːlɑː/, also Hela or hela cell, is a cell type in an immortal cell line used in scientific research. It is the oldest and most commonly used human cell line.[1] The line was derived from cervical cancer cells taken on February 8, 1951[2] from Henrietta Lacks, a patient who eventually died of her cancer on October 4, 1951. The cell line was found to be remarkably durable and prolific as illustrated by its contamination of many other cell lines used in research.[3][4]

YEAH immortality wait noooooooooooooooooooooooooo i dont want to live forever in pain

an interesting fact: there are more of Ms lacks cells alive today then when Ms lacks was alive in 1951, 20 tons actually

I also heard somewhere that we evolved to die and that cancer was the primary reason for this evolution
edit on 21-1-2013 by digital01anarchy because: (no reason given)


The question here is, what genes are the selfish genes? Are the cancer genes more selfish than the mitochondria? What is the most basic gene for life? What gene is the one that must survive and uses our genome toward that end?



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 08:24 AM
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Thanks to those that answered my question(s). I still think a lot of this is bizarre and probably just a messed up mutation than anything to do with real evolutionary extra DNA strands appearing, or re-appearing though.





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