The 1st recorded case of Tech suppression due to economic factors

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posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 09:55 AM
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I was watching the Discovery channel a few days ago and a show called ancient inventions came on



It was a great show if you like that kind of stuff but what struck me was 1 guy Id never heard of

ATS meet Hero (or Heron) of Alexandria



This guy was the ancient worlds Leonardo Da Vinci

Among the inventions credited to him are
* 1st vending machine: The first vending machine was also one of his constructions, when a coin was introduced via a slot on the top of the machine, a set amount of holy water was dispensed. When the coin was deposited, it fell upon a pan attached to a lever. The lever opened up a valve which let some water flow out. The pan continued to tilt with the weight of the coin until it fell off, at which point a counter-weight would snap the lever back up and turn off the valve
*the worlds first non seafaring use of wind powered device
*A force pump that was widely used in the Roman world, and one application was in a fire-engine.
*A standalone fountain that operates under self-contained hydrostatic energy.
*A syringe-like device was described by Heron to control the delivery of air or liquids
*the worlds first metered taxi, it worked via cogs that would turn with the wheel to turn another wheel that had beads evenly spaced around it that would drop into a container as the cart moved. You paid per bead.

But perhaps most remarkable amongst his inventions was the AEOLIPILE!!!!!!



This was effectively the worlds first steam powered device and its practical applications were endless.
Hero began using it for simple automata in many theater productions and also in temples to awe worshippers.
1 example is the temple to Apollo, the sacred fire would be lit and it in turn heated a cauldron underneath it. Steam would be channeled via a bronze tube to a bucket and after it filled with water a lever would be pressed opening the chamber that contained the gods statue, Pretty impressive stuff for someone living around the time of Jesus Id reckon.

So Hero takes his new device to the emperor and is shocked to be told its a no goer and heres why




Why was Hero’s steam turbine developed no farther than a novelty? In 1st century Greece, slaves were an important element of the economy, salves outnumbering freemen by more than two to one and they provided all the work anyone needed. The slave-based economy would have been rocked by the introduction of laborsaving devices and displaced slaves might have caused unrest or even revolution. And, so, the steam engine played a role in entertainment, but not business. It is reported that in Rome the emperor Vespasian purchased and destroyed the model of a mechanical device that would have made construction work more efficient, saying, “You must let me feed my poor commons (Sine me pascere plebeculam meam)” In these cases, preserving political stability motivated government to suppress technology, but at other times, governments have been motivated to support it.


The ancients were no less clever than us, can you imagine where we would be today if this had of been embraced instead of suppressed.
Steam engines of some description would most likely have spanned the world by 300AD, steam engines would have found the new worlds, the labour saving devices etc etc

The world would be a very different place is all we can say for sure.

So anyway, for anyone interested in Ancient History this guy is definitely worth a few hours of reading, Ive barely scratched the surface with this thread.

Heron on Wiki
Heron and his steam engine

EDIT: this is the first thread Ive managed to put pics in and not just links to them

Tried to star myself for effort but couldnt

edit on 21/1/2013 by IkNOwSTuff because: (no reason given)
edit on 21/1/2013 by IkNOwSTuff because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 10:10 AM
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Just maybe the invention did not die.
It just went underground and that why we have UFO.
Somebody took it and ran with it but in secret.



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 10:15 AM
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Very interesting! S&F.

When I get a minute I'll be sure to watch the embedded video.



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 10:20 AM
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Nice find, Iv seen that last invention somewhere before, but not heard anything about his previous such as the taxi or vending machine.

S+F for trying to star your self.



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 10:24 AM
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Originally posted by angryhulk
Very interesting! S&F.

When I get a minute I'll be sure to watch the embedded video.


Make that 150 minutes, thats the 1st in a 3 part series LOL

All very interesting and Terry Jones as a presenter is Awesome



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by IkNOwSTuff
 


S+F man, just because we can do that...... ya know? Will watch that video in due time.

Regards,



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 10:42 AM
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i've know about this for years...but, kudos to you for bringing it back to newbies, or people that didn't know...now...if he just drank dos eques mexican beer, he would be the "most interesting man in the world"...sorry, couldn't help myself



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 11:01 AM
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reply to post by IkNOwSTuff
 

Discovery Channel's quality has gone down quite a bit.

One of the real reasons the invention never went further was a lack of supporting technology to turn theory into real applications. In order to get steam to do work, you need to be able to build chambers that can stand huge amounts of pressure (his revolving sphere is really just a toy.) It requires solid pipes that are pressure capable (they were making pipes from lead, which can't take that much pressure) and reliable lubricants for moving parts (they had animal grease, which degrades quickly.)

Once they had good ways of creating more rust-resistant chambers out of stronger metals and had lubricants that were capable of handling the friction heat from rapidly moving metals, steam technology advanced quickly.



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 11:06 AM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


True but I think that if they did start exploring its possibilities these obstacles would have been easily overcome, well maybe not easily but I think we can be sure if they had of run with this invention back in Roman times we wouldnt have had to wait till the 19thC to have steam trains



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 02:57 PM
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Originally posted by Byrd
reply to post by IkNOwSTuff
 

Discovery Channel's quality has gone down quite a bit.

One of the real reasons the invention never went further was a lack of supporting technology to turn theory into real applications. In order to get steam to do work, you need to be able to build chambers that can stand huge amounts of pressure (his revolving sphere is really just a toy.) It requires solid pipes that are pressure capable (they were making pipes from lead, which can't take that much pressure) and reliable lubricants for moving parts (they had animal grease, which degrades quickly.)

Once they had good ways of creating more rust-resistant chambers out of stronger metals and had lubricants that were capable of handling the friction heat from rapidly moving metals, steam technology advanced quickly.



Yes

Here is a link to a discussion on this issue - with a number of details


A. A. Long:

I think one has to look at the so-called failure of technology to develop also in relation to the theoretical sciences. Here I'm partly agreeing with John Scarborough on the absurdity of the notion that you would try to prove the existence of the four humors. Why prove them? It's self-evident that they're there! In the case of astronomy: Greek astronomy is an astonishing achievement. But of course it was based, except for the brief moment of Hipparchus, on assumptions that we see as totally false. There just wasn't a sufficient reason to invent, for example, the telescope when you had an astronomical theory which, with extraordinary mathematics, could fit the appearances. You can save the appearances with Ptolemaic astronomy. Copernicus could have hunches that things were wrong, but it was only when Galileo showed that the moons of Jupiter were actually going around Jupiter that you had any basic evidence for questioning that kind of astronomy. So economic conditions are only one factor; but we also need to look at the state of the theoretical sciences to see why technological devices were not invented when we might think that there was a reason for them.





. Scarborough:

For the ancient mind the idea of an experiment to prove the existence or nonexistence of the four humors was irrelevant. People always ask, “Why didn't the Greeks discover the circulation of the blood?” as if they were looking for it. Well, they weren't. Why not? They had the idea after a while that blood functioned much as the philosophers had argued that things function: as a part of how the body worked in life. You might object that that doesn't answer anything; but it did for them. Even Leonardo studied anatomy much as Galen and Vesalius studied it. You look and you see and you explain. How do you explain? You have preconceived ideas and theories. You test them and see if they fit. The answer is always yes, they do. It comes down to the fact that the way you ask the question is almost as important as the answer you're looking for—which is postulated by the question you're asking. The problem is to formulate the question in a way that would be understood by the ancient mind. That's hard because of our scientific background.


The link

For those really interested in this question here is a link to references on this subject



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 10:27 PM
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Starred for the Terry

Flagged for the content.

Interesting invention the Aeliopile...I believe they tried building one on mythbusters or some show similar and it didn't really work out good.





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