Kentucky bans cities from banning firearms

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posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 05:22 PM
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A new state law in Kentucky bans cities from banning firearms.The state want's to make it clear that any law passed by the state Legislature will be the law in the Great state of Kentucky (God bless the commonweath).This is to prevent cities from inacting ordinances.That violate State law.Well folks being from KY. I can only see one reason for this and the anti-gun city folks ain't going to be happy.

Read the link.Post your thoughts.But remember this.After the link is a video of what our State legislature allows twice a year. Yee-Haa

www.wdrb.com... s-from-enacting-gun-laws


edit on 19-1-2013 by rockymcgilicutty because: (no reason given)
edit on 19-1-2013 by rockymcgilicutty because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


I usually don't get involved in all the gun stuff, but this time, I have to say that I'm proud to be a Kentuckian!

At least in the part of Kentucky that I'm in, there are not very many people who oppose gun rights and probably wouldn't admit to it if they did.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by gemineye
 


Same here lol that was awesome lol I've been to the Knob Creek gun range and was a experience of a lifetime,

Who doesn't like the smell of gun powder in the morning
or in this case night.
edit on 19-1-2013 by mytheroy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 05:44 PM
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Originally posted by gemineye
reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


I usually don't get involved in all the gun stuff, but this time, I have to say that I'm proud to be a Kentuckian!

At least in the part of Kentucky that I'm in, there are not very many people who oppose gun rights and probably wouldn't admit to it if they did.


Amen Brother,We are right up there with Texas and Tennessee.The Beatles put it oh so well.




posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by mytheroy
 


It's expensive too,I pulled the trigger on a fifty cal.$100.00 in about 30 seconds.
Couldn't afford to try a Mini-Gun.$$$$$$$



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


I'm a sister, but Amen anyway!


All of my neighbors have been out actively celebrating "national gun day" today. It's been a noisy day, but a good one!


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posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:10 PM
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What we have here is another state who represents We The People and not the Traitors.

Well done Kentucky, you make Americans (real Americans) proud indeed.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:12 PM
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Seems about about right.

I lived in Bowling Green for 2.5 years and this does not surprise me in the least.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:12 PM
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Small world.I take my son out there occasionally for target practice.
I now know where "the dude" comes into play.


That's good that cities can't ban firearms,not that it would matter in the west end of Louisville.

Heck,most people I know have a secondary "farm" where they all hunt and so on.
edit on 19-1-2013 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:14 PM
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It's good to see yet another state joining the ranks of America versus um. . . well a country that has a constitution with more holes in it than a silhouette at a gun range.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


If only the rest of the states would follow suit.
Constitutional carry would be nice as well



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:17 PM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


Feds don't respect state law as proven with prop 215 in Cali. If it is federally illegal then the feds will still enforce the law in a state, even if it's legal by state law.


The Supremacy Clause (Article VI, Clause 2) of the United States Constitution declares that federal laws are the "supreme Law of the Land." Hence, state court laws are inferior so long as the federal law is valid (constitutional).


When state and federal laws conflict Why does federal law supersede state law?



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:17 PM
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Great news.Congratulations. I hope that this is contagious and spreads northward.
2nd



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by ANOK
reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


Feds don't respect state law as proven with prop 215 in Cali. If it is federally illegal then the feds will still enforce the law in a state, even if it's legal by state law.


The Supremacy Clause (Article VI, Clause 2) of the United States Constitution declares that federal laws are the "supreme Law of the Land." Hence, state court laws are inferior so long as the federal law is valid (constitutional).




Aaaaaand then there's nullification.

en.wikipedia.org...(U.S._Constitution)
edit on 19-1-2013 by 11235813213455 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by ANOK
reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


Feds don't respect state law as proven with prop 215 in Cali. If it is federally illegal then the feds will still enforce the law in a state, even if it's legal by state law.


The Supremacy Clause (Article VI, Clause 2) of the United States Constitution declares that federal laws are the "supreme Law of the Land." Hence, state court laws are inferior so long as the federal law is valid (constitutional).


When state and federal laws conflict Why does federal law supersede state law?



Well, since it is still Constitutional to "bear arms" then the feds don't have a shot (pardon the pun) at getting their way.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by gemineye
 

"We say please and we say Ma'am if you ain,t from the south we don't give a dam." Hank

So excuse me Ma'am



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:23 PM
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Originally posted by 11235813213455

Aaaaaand then there's nullification.


Aaaaand why not explain what that is?

I'll do it for you I guess.


The theory of nullification has never been legally upheld; rather, the Supreme Court has rejected it...

...The theory of nullification has been rejected repeatedly by the courts...


Nullification (U.S. Constitution)

An Englishman explaining to Americans their own constitution, gotta love it.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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Originally posted by ANOK
reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


Feds don't respect state law as proven with prop 215 in Cali. If it is federally illegal then the feds will still enforce the law in a state, even if it's legal by state law.


The Supremacy Clause (Article VI, Clause 2) of the United States Constitution declares that federal laws are the "supreme Law of the Land." Hence, state court laws are inferior so long as the federal law is valid (constitutional).


When state and federal laws conflict Why does federal law supersede state law?



Hmmm, Ain't that there the talk, what started the last internal conflict?Glad we'uns is on the same side.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:28 PM
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Originally posted by beezzer
Well, since it is still Constitutional to "bear arms" then the feds don't have a shot (pardon the pun) at getting their way.


It's also in the Constitution that states have rights.


The Tenth Amendment (Amendment X) to the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, was ratified on December 15, 1791.[1] The Tenth Amendment states the Constitution's principle of federalism by providing that powers not granted to the federal government by the Constitution, nor prohibited to the States, are reserved to the States or the people.


en.wikipedia.org...

Yet the feds can still supersede state law when laws conflict. That is why they can raid cannabis dispensaries.
The same thing would happen with gun control, they would find excuses to raid and confiscate guns.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:33 PM
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Originally posted by ANOK

Originally posted by 11235813213455

Aaaaaand then there's nullification.


Aaaaand why not explain what that is?

I'll do it for you I guess.


The theory of nullification has never been legally upheld; rather, the Supreme Court has rejected it...

...The theory of nullification has been rejected repeatedly by the courts...


Nullification (U.S. Constitution)

An Englishman explaining to Americans their own constitution, gotta love it.


Sure... a limp wristed Englishman spelling it out for me.
Please read an informative amount of my previous posts.


You seem to be confused as to the temperature of the times. The pillars of many things previously untested are currently being tested. Societies and countries typically don't set precedences.......... til they do.
edit on 19-1-2013 by 11235813213455 because: (no reason given)





 
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