A good explanation of death

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posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 10:11 AM
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This is not a thread about Eckhart Tolle. Im just using this video because its a very good explanation of death which lines up with my own experience.

Only forms die. The formless awareness remains untouched by the coming and going of forms. Awakening is simply the dis-identification with form.

If at the time of physical death if there is still a tendency to identify with physical and phychological forms then another form will appear and the play will continue.

If there is no longer an identification with the form at the time that it dissolves then there is no longer a need or compulsion to continue in the embodied mode. But again, if there is a desire to do so then that is what will happen.


youtu.be...
edit on 19-1-2013 by emeris because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by emeris
 


It's hard for anyone to describe, define, or communicate something very few have ever even come close to being. That's the problem with death theories. They all revolve around a state of being that no one here can even imagine.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by emeris
 


Sounds about right...


apparently you can only serve one God...




posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by AfterInfinity
 


Its impossible to describe, define, communicate or imagine because those are activities of the mind. You are that state of being but at the moment there is a false identification with the mind and its activity. When the false identity is dropped you simply remain as that which you already are without the false identity wrapped up in the physical and phychological form.

If the form dies and this false identity is still there then it will simply transfer over to a new form. Now im not saying that this is a bad thing. If that sounds good to you then great, continue on. But at some point you will start to realize the falseness of this identity and start the work of dropping it.
edit on 19-1-2013 by emeris because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 11:14 AM
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reply to post by emeris
 


Once the form dies, it starts to decompose. This is true because it happens every time.

Aristotle said the soul is what gives the body its form. Mind, soul, spirit, body—all being a part of that form or at least an epiphenomenon of that form—evaporate or decompose when the form can no longer hold itself together. Whatever energy is left over seeps into the environment where the decomposing form finally rests. This is true because it happens every time.

What happens with the identity, or the relationship shared between the body and the rest of the universe? Now that the body is gone, the relationship is broken. The identity associated with that relationship existed at one time, but no longer.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 11:20 AM
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Originally posted by emeris
This is not a thread about Eckhart Tolle. Im just using this video because its a very good explanation of death which lines up with my own experience.


So.. you're dead?



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by Nevertheless
 


The experience is the dropping of identification with form.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by TheSubversiveOne
 


My belief is that the soul is what gives the body its meaning. Without the soul, the body is an autonomous sack of smelly disgusting organic machinery. The soul is observation. The soul is comprehension. The soul gives meaning and purpose. When something becomes more than just a tool or a gear in the clockwork of the world, that is when it has a soul.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by AfterInfinity
 


Do you see the soul as having a form?



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 11:49 AM
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Originally posted by emeris
reply to post by Nevertheless
 


The experience is the dropping of identification with form.


So, not death? Why was it in the same sentence?



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 11:53 AM
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reply to post by Nevertheless
 


Because when you realize your formless nature by dis-identifying from form you understand that death applies only to the form and not to your real self.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by AfterInfinity
 


I like that idea. It seems in line with what we do know about death. My idea of the soul is sort of like that.

To me the soul is the entire memory one has of himself. Whenever I reflect, I am looking into my soul, my memory, every thing I've ever impressed and expressed, and everything I've experienced with my senses and my body. Every word I've spoke is created out of the pool of knowledge stored in the memory I have of myself. So is every dream. So is every idea.

Everything I've learned, everything I've created or destroyed is done so while referring to the memory, or conversing with the soul. Every experience is as much a part of my soul as everything else. Every time I reflect on these experiences or imagine new ones, I'm remembering myself and the things that have happened in relation to my entirety, all of which add to what I consider my soul.

To me, that memory of the entirety of one's being, physical and non-physical, all inward and outward expression, is what we call the soul.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 12:29 PM
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Originally posted by emeris
reply to post by Nevertheless
 


Because when you realize your formless nature by dis-identifying from form you understand that death applies only to the form and not to your real self.


Could it be that your experience wasn't what it "felt like"?



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by Nevertheless
 


I only used the word experience because i'm using words. Its not really an experience. Once the mistaken identity drops away you remain what you always were, only now without the false sense of self.

Words deal with forms so at best they can only point to 'that'. Don't get hung up on the words.





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