Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

University Is Useless

page: 1
3
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 04:43 AM
link   
So I decided I want to go University but even though I am not the typical 18-20 range. At being 26 seams like I'm old but I'm not it turns out after asking a few people, infact far from it, well in regards to going to uni!.

But unfortunately I haven't found the course my mind desires, you maybe asking yourself what course does the posters mind request.

I want a course that is a Programming course Computer Programming obviously, but every one I have checked has a lot of STUPID counter parts to it. I want a simple C/C++ Course but apparently that is not possibly and I have to learn about 15 other things with which is I actually calculate the time I would spend on this course compared with the rest it would be about 1 semester. Which any coder out there know you can learn hardly any language in 1 semester. Any one know of some pure Programming courses?

I know your gonna say well it takes some personal study as well. But I want a course that is purely programming, the only one I can find is game programming and to me that is useless.

Any ideas?



yes I know some of you are gonna say UNI is a pointless wastes of time and you can study the same stuff at home for none of the price, but it turns out people in the UK don't just hire people who say they can program. I need a DEGREE!




posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 04:51 AM
link   
reply to post by definity
 


In today’s world, you don’t need a degree, unless you want to be a lawyer, doctor or some such. For most things you need a certification. (At least here in the US) That is the quickest route to a job. And it’s cheaper to boot. Does the UK even accept certification courses?

Of course, once you get a job, Network! Network! Network! Make friends with those who can advance your career. I know, some will call it kissing butt, but that is not always true if you like your job.
edit on 19-1-2013 by TDawgRex because: need more coffee



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 04:54 AM
link   
reply to post by definity
 


Hit up a trade-school if you want a specified skill. Though, when it come to programming, it is like art, you need a portfolio in my opinion.

As far as university or college (for my kinsman), a degree is for the most part a rite of passage that you have dedication and will-power to see something through, not indicative of your intelligence or know with all in many cases (save that of what TRex mentioned; professional jobs....)


ETA: If the trend is you need a degree...buckle down, suck it up and get the degree to better your situation. The easy path is never the better road traveled my friend.
edit on 19-1-2013 by ownbestenemy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 05:00 AM
link   
reply to post by definity
 
If you are required to have a Degree in programming by employers, you'll find that they are dictating a lot of the course content.

I read slashdot every day and the programmers and devs on there get bragging rights by knowing multiple coding languages. You could find that limiting yourself to C/C++ would only leave you unable to compete with the guys who know more.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 05:14 AM
link   
Trade school, community college, internet course, as someone else already said you don`t need a degree a certificate is good enough.employers just want to see a piece of paper proving that you have some kind of formal training.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 05:32 AM
link   
reply to post by definity
 


UNI is a good experience but an expensive one unless you can finance yourself through it.

I finished my degree in 2001 but only paid my student loan off last year, 11 long years of someone dipping their hand in your wages isn't fun!

Considering you can teach yourself C/C++ from one of the plethora of books available is it really worth it?



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 05:41 AM
link   
reply to post by definity
 


As others have said, if you want a career out of this you'd be in better shape doing the degree. Not only does it give you a broad range of skills, but it shows a certain level of enthusiasm, willingness to learn and personal organisation which employers love...

For example, one of my Uncles wanted into the RAF as a pilot. He needed a degree to do so. Do they do degrees in flying, no they do not. So he did a degree in Microbiology would you believe! All it proved to the RAF was he had intelligence and was able to learn well and motivate himself, therefore making him good trainee pilot material.

I myself am starting an Open University course later in the year doing Software development. It seems to have a large Java component, which I am not that interested in if I am honest but it all looks good to employers and not being a one-trick pony is always a good idea.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 05:53 AM
link   
reply to post by definity
 


Just to add something, (again, I'm not from the UK so I don't know if this is applicable), but it worked for me.

Get certified in the field you like and find a job. You'll start off as a worker bee, but now you'll have a income to offset those other educational bills.

Go to school on your off time. That is pretty much commonplace nowadays, though it can be tough. But in the long run, it pays off. It will also show your employer that you are dedicated. They may even help offset your educational bills as well.

I'm living proof. Dropped out of High School at 17 and retired at 48. Hard work and dedication does pay off...it's just a long road.

Good luck!
edit on 19-1-2013 by TDawgRex because: COFFEE! Need more coffee!



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:01 AM
link   
I guess it depends on what you want to do with that knowledge. If you want to be able to go to an employer right after and have him take an interest, this won't work. But, if you want to do it for yourself, or maybe start programming independently...

alison.com...

I could find other freebies if that is the way you want to go.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:01 AM
link   
reply to post by definity
 


I have two degrees. I live in shared accommodations with my girlfriend, brother, and a roommate. I have good future earning potential, but there aren't currently a lot of job opportunities in my chosen field. I am glad that I went to university, even though it means that I am in debt. I've always lived frugally, and I expect to be able to pay off my debts after 2 years of full-time employment.

I do not own a car, or have any major expenses. My partner and I rarely if ever eat out. We grow a garden in the back yard, can our produce, and cook meals at home. We live in one of the cheapest rental accommodations we could find, in a surprisingly good neighborhood. My partner and I are waiting until our debts are paid to get married and have children.

If I hadn't gone to university, our life now would be pretty much the same -- minus the debt.

But ten years from now?...

I'm glad I went to University.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:04 AM
link   

Originally posted by RedBird
I have good future earning potential, but there aren't currently a lot of job opportunities in my chosen field.


A question for you: Did you choose the field because you anticipate there will be earning in it or because there were earning it and now that you are done, it is all dried up?
edit on 19-1-2013 by ownbestenemy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:41 AM
link   
University isn't neccesarily pointless but if you want something other than a piece of paper I believe you have to go to the right university more than anything.

Call someone you might like to work for and just ask them what courses / universities they look for is one very good approach.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 06:53 AM
link   
reply to post by definity
 


Try this thread. It has free online college courses. You might not get credit, but you can try a subject out and see if it truly interests you.

Good luck!

Free Online College Courses



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 07:08 AM
link   
I had to learn Pascal in college, which at the time was already obsolete, we all wanted the pascal module replaced with C++ or java, or even a straight up choice to bin it and do something else like networking, which on an IT course you would expect to learn anyway.

I left college and got a few temp jobs then a basic IT job, then more IT jobs while some of my friends from college went to university to study more specific areas. By the time they had to get a job they found that no one would take them on without 2-3 years of IT related work before they would get to use their degree, and when they did i had 5 years of IT behind me and a far bigger pay check, 5 years later (present) the majority have not caught up, and some dont even have an IT related job!

I could have just studied by myself any programming i wanted to in the evenings and pass a few online tests and then stick that on my CV. Im not actually interested in programming, but i did study for Microsoft certifications and cisco courses, pass the exams (some of which were payed for by the company's i were working for), pay went up CV gets longer.

All in all, IT moves so fast with hardware technology and software upgrades than most courses are ALWAYS far behind, so unless you want to do some fundamental computing courses, id say get basic IT work and do the online/book thing.
edit on 19-1-2013 by Biigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 07:12 AM
link   
TBH that to all the people , I mean that really you don't know how much you have affected my life's direction! Cos i can't live in the current state I am in for much longer.

I know people are saying study by myself but companies don't like that concept they want qualifications. and hear it is a lot easier to get a job when you are a graduate than not!

The only reason im saying is because the jobs I want to apply for and im talking about 98% are mostly asking for graduates or experience and I have NOT got that..

Even though i know that i can learn the stuff they want and plus in a year they still wont look at my CV cos I aint been in work for like 4 years

I think uni is stupid because it teaches F all!



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 07:32 AM
link   
reply to post by definity
 


I feel your anger . I am 45 and i left school in year 8 at about 14 years old. This year i was thinking about going back to school .Phew is it really worth it ? I only want to study words and maybe a bit of maths .I had an awkward start and did not do well at school , low marks except for basic latin got A for that . I feel a bit angry as well and i am trying to get past that .It's been a long time . cheers1%
edit on 19-1-2013 by my1percent because: i was sure i spelt school correctly



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 07:51 AM
link   

Originally posted by ownbestenemy

Hit up a trade-school if you want a specified skill.




This.

At my university in Florida, the C class started out with literally standing room only -- I estimate well over 50 people. Less than a dozen of us made it thru the course. Similar event happened in Cobol. My perception is that they were more interested in thinning the ranks than teaching.

A nearby vocational school appears to take the opposite tack -- they are more interested in the student actually learning. If you need "credentials", this may be the way to go. Be aware that many positions in civil service will accept vocational certificates while commercial companies may turn up their nose.

For self learning or pre-learning, I've always found the "[subject] for Dummies" books to help launch me on any new subject. It's a bonus that you can read them in an evening.






posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 08:02 AM
link   
reply to post by jcarpenter
 


Yeah but a typical C/PHP/C#/ASP/C++/Python course don't cut it, they want people who know libraries and extreme detail to the language any person can learn the basics of it in a 2 days crash course.



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 08:10 AM
link   
I hope more people begin to understand this soon. Just more manipulation...



posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 08:45 AM
link   
University may not be right for e erroneous, but it's far from useless.

I loved my time in university, both undergraduate and graduate school. And I've used what I learned, not just in my chosen profession, but in my life in general.





new topics

top topics



 
3
<<   2 >>

log in

join