Nature's hand warmers (and other heat-related products)

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posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 10:45 AM
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'tis the season for cold hands, in the North, and I've been thinking about hand warmers! There are chemical heating pads you can get at any outdoor/survival store but does Nature provide any for us?

My first thought was a fistful of deer moss, maybe ferns or juniper?

Anyone have any knowledge on this?

I imagine there are some plants that could reactively produce heat, friction, porousness, etc.

Any thoughts on handwarmers, blanketing material and similar?




posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 10:50 AM
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OK, this is not a joke so don't attack me, but seriously if wanted my hands to get warm quick I would put them under my own armpits. I know you'd look stupid, but I can't think of anything in the woods that would produce that kind of heat.
edit on 17-1-2013 by Ireminisce because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 10:51 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


Rabbit fur



but does Nature provide any for us?



Its not a joke.. When you get cold, heat and blood flow leaves your extremities and head to your heart and brain.


OK, this is not a joke so don't attack me, but seriously if wanted my hands to get warm quick I would put them under my own armpits.
edit on 1/17/2013 by Juggernog because: (no reason given)
edit on 1/17/2013 by Juggernog because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 10:53 AM
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Cayenne Pepper applied topically will increase bloodflow to the area and possibly save some digits from frostbite, but it's something I hope I never have to rely on. I think nature's best answer to this one is giving us the sense to put our hands in our pockets or wear a pair of gloves when it's cold.

Heating stones in a fire and then burying them about a foot or so beneath your sleeping area works pretty well, just make sure you don't heat a stone that has been in water or a low lying area or it can explode with sufficient force to kill you.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 10:59 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


well, gloves is an unsarcastic answer and a reason why i have not really experimented on this issue (i often work in forests/fields etc), but ash is a good insulator for heat i think, maybe mix it with some warm poop and you are good to go, just dont pick your nose. or your teeth.

if you are on the move and have a little prep time, you could make a tubular birch or beech bark container, use polypore for an easily carved circular base and top, then hav a bed of fresh leaves in there and place a coal inside (the fresh leaves stop the ember/coal burning through the container, a layer of ash will also help), again polypore or a fomes type fungus will work well as a coal - you will need to put some holes in the container to allow for air flow and may need to give it ther odd blow to keep the ember going. i have never tried this as a hand warmer but have carried an ember for hours via this method


obvs you could build a fire too
edit on 17-1-2013 by skalla because: clarity and the obvious fire remark



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 10:59 AM
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reply to post by Juggernog
 


I guess my answers wrong then? Yea, living in Tx, I know nothing about cold, so I'd like to know too.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


If it's an emergency, stick your hand down the front of your pants. Pride takes a backseat when frostbite is an issue.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:05 AM
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reply to post by Ireminisce
 


Not wrong. I first learned this when I was a lad in army cadets. It works wonders, Thanks for the flashback



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:10 AM
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reply to post by Ireminisce
 


No, I just didnt explain myself right..

All of the blood flow is heading up your arms and legs.. The groin is also a good place to put your hands... (and not like that lol)
btw, im in Tx as well

Warm your fingers with your own body heat. If you are stuck outside in extreme temperatures with no gloves or mittens, use your body heat to keep your fingers from freezing. Put your hands in your arm pits, groin or behind your knees. These are some of the warmest places on your body and they will help keep the frostbite away


link



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:15 AM
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LOL The first thing I thought of?
My dogs.

I live in MI and I actually do this. Not obviously for survival, but hey, I have them and they have warm bellies.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:22 AM
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Use what you have

pee in a bottle





posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


Don't breathe hot air on your hands. Breath has water droplets in it, so even though it feels warm for a moment, they are then colder because they got wet.

Also, putting a cooked potato in your pocket used to do the trick for my mom. I think I did it a few times when I lived up north. They stay hot for a long time. I think that coal works as well...even not heated. Once it absorbs some of your body heat from somewhere else, it will stay warm a little while. So you can stick it in your glove. I'm pretty sure anyway.

Don't wear cotton. Cotton is bad because it doesn't wick away moisture. Never wear cotton socks. Wool or some synthetic material is better.
edit on 17-1-2013 by fictitious because: sp
edit on 17-1-2013 by fictitious because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


I don't know anything off hand, but i suppose you mean if were caught in the cold and needed to warm them versus actually looking for an alternative.

I would not rely on "moss."

You would need to find a group of natural products that, once combined, create an exothermic reaction. Sadly, i do not know such a thing, but i'm sure compounds exist, it's just finding the and the "recipe."

The handwarmers you buy are generally made of mostly natural ingredients, are activated by air, and produce heat through their chemical reaction. I've been in freezing weather for 10-11 hours w/o hand warmers (and with little activity), and even though i had gloves, i could not keep them warm at the end of that time. Eventually, the blood moves from the hands/feet and eventually the surface of the body. So, i stocked up on the hand (and feet) warmers and always keep them in my backpack. Once you're stuck in the cold (and/or rain) and miserable once, you learn.


If i didn't have gloves, i would use my body heat, stick them in my pants or under my arms, but that will only last so long, until your core starts to drop,then you're in trouble.

But finding a combination of plants to produce heat, that are local to the area, would be very cool.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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Dogs do make excellent blankets.

I've heard of farmers putting baked potatoes in tinfoil in their pockets for warmth, and then they also have lunch once they've cooled down a bit.

The problem with putting your hands in your armpits or groin, is that your jacket is in the way if the temperature is cold. You can't be opening your jacket at 20 or 40 below to warm your hands or the rest of you freezes.



**I see someone has already tried the potato method.

edit on 17-1-2013 by snowspirit because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by cjttatu
 


Exactly!!
Its also sterile so you can rinse the bottle out and reuse it.
When sleeping in cold weather take the bottle to bed with you so you don't have to get out of bed and lose heat.
Pee in it and hold to your body.



Warm up some rocks by a fire,this also works well.
edit on 17-1-2013 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:30 PM
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Great posts! Thanks for the good ideas



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 11:55 PM
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I have a great method, but my wife always slaps me and says that im not allowed to do that in public.



posted on Jan, 18 2013 @ 02:48 AM
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reply to post by Superhans
 


not only that but it makes your hands wet and attracts seagulls too.



posted on Jan, 18 2013 @ 12:57 PM
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skunk cabbage (Lysichiton americanus) produces enough heat to melt snow. It stinks but so does dying of hypothermia.



posted on Jan, 18 2013 @ 01:29 PM
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Boobs (.) (.) are nice and toasty and natural, well most are





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