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Claim: Meteorite discovered with signs of life in it

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posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 09:53 PM
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We aren't alone? Possible fossil in 2012 Meterite


wattsupwiththat.com

This is from a recent meteorite find in December 2012. A large fire ball was seen by a large number of people in Sri Lanka on December 29th 2012, during that episode a large meteorite disintegrated and fell to Earth in the village of Araganwila which is few miles away from the city of Polonnaruwa.

Look at what the electron microscope shows of a sample purported to be from the meteorite:
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
journalofcosmology.com
edit on 14-1-2013 by LetsGoViking because: Sticky keyboard....
edit on Mon Jan 14 2013 by DontTreadOnMe because: BAN title must = source title




posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 09:53 PM
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This is a very interesting story developing. If the photograph is vetted and real, this a major find, following on the whole "disclosure" meme. I can't wait to what the other scientists are going to say. I find it interesting that Dr. Leif Svaalgard, the skeptic's skeptic is cautiously entertaining the idea...

wattsupwiththat.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 14-1-2013 by LetsGoViking because: (no reason given)
edit on 14-1-2013 by LetsGoViking because: Forgot the Dr., doctor



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 10:08 PM
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Wonder if they will be straight with the public or just shuck it under the rug like anything else we cant handle knowing!
The red rain after is the key, maybe some type of biological seeding

and not the first time this has happened ...very interesting indeed



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by paradiselost333
 


Very interesting times we live in, far more interesting than that pesky "end of the world in 2012" stuff.


Your comment about "seeding" has some rather ominous overtones that my paranoid other half didn't need to think about!



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 10:16 PM
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the skeptic's skeptic is cautiously entertaining the idea

Actually, he only really commented on the journal in which the article was published. His opinion is not shared by all scientists.


www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 1/14/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 10:18 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Missed those...Thanks!



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 10:35 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


This is true, but it's very rare for Dr. Svaalgard to even remotely step outside the box, at least in his public replies. I have to admit to being something of a Leif fan for his no-nonsense, logical rebuttals. The fact that he didn't, other than mention the possibility of it being a tektite, says something.



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 10:57 PM
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We're not alone? Does this make it official or do we have to wait until CNN says so?

Guess this would probably be why PaddyPower wasn't taking bets for extraterrestrial life discovery in 2013...
2013 The Year Extra-Terestrial...

Is this the same discovery referenced in this thread?
Extraterrestrial (microbial) life found...



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by coldkidc
We're not alone? Does this make it official or do we have to wait until CNN says so?

Guess this would probably be why PaddyPower wasn't taking bets for extraterrestrial life discovery in 2013...
2013 The Year Extra-Terestrial...


It does make one wonder. However, it still needs to be fully vetted before a conclusion is reached. There is still the quite possible explanation that it is a tektite (Early Earth strike, critter flung into space in an elliptical return orbit). We just have to wait and see. Still, very interesting none the less.


Is this the same discovery referenced in this thread?
Extraterrestrial (microbial) life found...


Yep, same one, different secondary source. I missed it earlier.
edit on 14-1-2013 by LetsGoViking because: (no reason given)
edit on 14-1-2013 by LetsGoViking because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 11:18 PM
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If true then is this really such a surprise?

However, something doesn't seem right with this story, but I'll reserve judgement until more is known.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 12:38 AM
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Aaagh. I remember some really off-the-wall Russian guy back in the 60s that claimed he had cultured really atypical bacteria from chondrites. His name is on the tip of my fingers, but I can't get it, nor does it show up in Google.

Phage, do you remember that at all?

edit to add: all I can find are Russians who managed to prove that chondrites are contaminated within seconds, even inside the meteor, where you wouldn't think they could go
edit on 15-1-2013 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:43 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
Actually, he only really commented on the journal in which the article was published. His opinion is not shared by all scientists.


Well there you go, Phage has spoken, and the opinion is not shared by all scientists.. any questions?


Anyway, fascinating OP. I think it was Terrance Mckenna that first suggested the only life form capable of incindental interstellar travel would be Fungi spores, would be really interesting to know that bacteria can traverse the eons and light years as well.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 10:31 AM
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Anyone know if this is being independently verified?
Exciting stuff for sure...



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 12:28 PM
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Maybe it got stuck to the meteorite when it landed? Somehow it got there when they were picking it up or meanwhile they were looking for it. It's more likely that the living organism was added to the rock after it landed, As how many organisms live after a free-fall from the sky?



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by Misbah
As how many organisms live after a free-fall from the sky?

Well if your to believe a lot of things all life on this planet came from a meteorite billions of years ago so yeah..



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by Misbah
Maybe it got stuck to the meteorite when it landed? Somehow it got there when they were picking it up or meanwhile they were looking for it. It's more likely that the living organism was added to the rock after it landed, As how many organisms live after a free-fall from the sky?


It's a form of algae mate and it is very adaptable anywhere imo



posted on Jan, 16 2013 @ 12:59 PM
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Originally posted by Misbah
Maybe it got stuck to the meteorite when it landed? Somehow it got there when they were picking it up or meanwhile they were looking for it. It's more likely that the living organism was added to the rock after it landed, As how many organisms live after a free-fall from the sky?
The report states that fossil diatoms were found inside the meteorite, not on its surface. That the meteorite was contaminated by Earthly algae after it fell also seems unlikely because it is reported that they are mineralized in the same way as the meteorite itself.



posted on Jan, 17 2013 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by Ross 54
 


Still waiting for more information. There is, apparently, some missing information in the paper regarding the exact method of electron microscopy that was employed along with the relevant details that might answer if this was possible contamination. We wait and see if the authors reply.



posted on Jan, 18 2013 @ 12:49 AM
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If there’s a story practically guaranteed to go viral, it’s about evidence of life in space. And if you have pictures, why, that’s going to spread like, well, like a virus.

So the moment I heard that a paper had been published saying that diatoms—a type of algae, microscopic plant life, that have hard outer shells made of silica and come in a variety of shapes and forms—had been found in a meteorite, I knew I’d get flooded with emails and tweets and Facebook messages because LIFE IN SPACE!

And so I did. People are really curious about this!

But then I read the actual paper, and guess what? Let me be delicate: It’s wrong. Really, really wrong. Way, way, way ridiculously oh-holy-wow-how-could-anyone-publish-this wrong.


Bad Astronomer Link


I had some of these suspicions, but Phil Plait sums it up a lot better, with details.



posted on Jan, 18 2013 @ 12:22 PM
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Dr. Phil Plait's blog at Slate, on the meteorite containing fossils, is questionable. He admits that he is not an expert on meteorites, and apparently did not consult one, either. He merely states that the object does not look like a meteorite to him, even of the granular carbonaceous chondrite type. I was able to find a picture of a meteorite of this type, which looks very much like the Sri Lankan object. It took only a few minutes of going through Google Image files to find it. Dr. Plait seems unduly hasty in his dismissal of this new discovery.
At least he did consult one biologist about the organisms found in the meteorite. This person thought that the diatoms looked too much like those found on Earth to be from anywhere else. He did not specify a single Earthly species; only made a broad statement. He apparently ignored the finding that the diatoms were fossilized, which, of course, would not be expected if organisms from Earth had contaminated the meteorite in the few days between its falling and its being found.






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