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Spy agency ASIO wants powers to hack into personal computers

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posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 06:43 AM
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Originally posted by nottelling
. It's about time you people all stopped whingeing about privacy (haha) and liberty (LOL) and freedom (ROFL). This is the way it has to be. We are under continuing threat from the terrorists and if a few people get their animal porn fetish exposed in the process of our heroic government security forces meeting said threat, then so be it. If you don't like it then go move to Waziristan with all bin Laden's mates, because you're unAustralian..





When the nothing-to-hide argument is unpacked, and its underlying assumptions examined and challenged, we can see how it shifts the debate to its terms, then draws power from its unfair advantage. The nothing-to-hide argument speaks to some problems but not to others. It represents a singular and narrow way of conceiving of privacy, and it wins by excluding consideration of the other problems often raised with government security measures. When engaged directly, the nothing-to-hide argument can ensnare, for it forces the debate to focus on its narrow understanding of privacy. But when confronted with the plurality of privacy problems implicated by government data collection and use beyond surveillance and disclosure, the nothing-to-hide argument, in the end, has nothing to say.




chronicle.com...


Maybe you should expand your narrow view on privacy. Stop regurgitating media regulated excuses as your own. Think deeper and further about the larger awareness surrounding deprived privacy. It is not un-Australian to want to have privacy. It's normal to want privacy, solitude. Read that article and stop being so close minded.




posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by mc4denmark
 

Thank you for saying so.I know only dealing with actual solid hard facts makes you stick out like a sore thumb around here,but it's all I know so it'll always be the way with me
.
One more fact I meant to add to my last post was that they used that very method to catch someone in a VERY famous case.I can't remember for sure who was involved,but it could have been Richard Nixon and the Watergate affair or something similar
.



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by vkturbo
 


If I was Steinberg I'd SUE this agency for dirtying the good name of their rather excellent low latency sound driver / pipeline - buggers!

Seriously, this is truly screwed up. I'd trust the gov's 'noble' motive as much as I'd trust a POLITICIAN / STATE with my life/money/kids/grandma... All the places I wanted to escape to (from the UK) have also been taken over by corporo-socio-fascist bastardised socio-economic system and it's TECHNO-SPY REGIME...

As much as I agree the internet is a shambles on so many levels and about as trustworthy as an Australian Red-Back Spider I trust it more than the Australian Funnel-Web GOVERNMENT!

??????????????????? TRUST ????????????????????



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 04:33 PM
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Originally posted by Strainz

Originally posted by nottelling
. It's about time you people all stopped whingeing about privacy (haha) and liberty (LOL) and freedom (ROFL). This is the way it has to be. We are under continuing threat from the terrorists and if a few people get their animal porn fetish exposed in the process of our heroic government security forces meeting said threat, then so be it. If you don't like it then go move to Waziristan with all bin Laden's mates, because you're unAustralian..





When the nothing-to-hide argument is unpacked, and its underlying assumptions examined and challenged, we can see how it shifts the debate to its terms, then draws power from its unfair advantage. The nothing-to-hide argument speaks to some problems but not to others. It represents a singular and narrow way of conceiving of privacy, and it wins by excluding consideration of the other problems often raised with government security measures. When engaged directly, the nothing-to-hide argument can ensnare, for it forces the debate to focus on its narrow understanding of privacy. But when confronted with the plurality of privacy problems implicated by government data collection and use beyond surveillance and disclosure, the nothing-to-hide argument, in the end, has nothing to say.




chronicle.com...


Maybe you should expand your narrow view on privacy. Stop regurgitating media regulated excuses as your own. Think deeper and further about the larger awareness surrounding deprived privacy. It is not un-Australian to want to have privacy. It's normal to want privacy, solitude. Read that article and stop being so close minded.


Maybe you should learn to understand sarcasm without needing an emoticon to do it.

Ask yourself why is it that YOU are the only person who jumped on that comment. Why didn't a dozen or so other ruggedly individualistic Australian ATSers get there first and metaphorically stomp me into the ground? Because they knew it was lame sarcasm. And now... so do you.



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by nottelling
 


I thought it was quite simple. You replied to me, I replied to you. Not like you quoted anybody else. Besides sarcasm doesn't always translate well, it can be seen as overly aggressive and seeing as you were in reply to me it came across as an overly aggressive statement towards me, not to the community. Next time don't quote me with your sarcasm. Include everybody in with no quoted information, oh wait, then your post would truly be seen as nothing.

You put two and two together and there really isn't anything to learn. Your sarcasm isn't funny.
___________________________________________________________________________________________


So I have seen ASIO recruitment information personally and in the particular job description it involved profiling Australian Citizens on a daily basis, anywhere in your City at any given moment. You had to be ready to take extensive notes on the target. Allowing them to hack personal computers is giving these operatives the right to jack into your WIFI legally.

But what does this article even matter? Not like we are going to do anything to stop ASIO getting these new powers. Not like we CAN do anything. Most people in Australia are like old mate ^, sarcastic or not, don't give two flying f#@$s about their rights or privacy. Because they have nothing to hide - they have facebook.

The truth is that we are going to have to accept that the majority of people don't want privacy out of fear of being singled out for discrimination.

Peace.


edit on 14-1-2013 by Strainz because: * G



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 03:11 PM
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The only thing ASIO does in this country is use thier anti-terrorist powers against Activists and Indigenous Australians. I went to an exhibition of photgraphed ASIO agents spying on activists. Hilarious what my tax money is spent on. Now they want to have power not only to spy BUT INFECT WITH VIRUSES? They want the power to cause malicius damage to hippies computers?



posted on Jan, 28 2013 @ 03:33 AM
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Originally posted by twisted-timothy
The only thing ASIO does in this country is use thier anti-terrorist powers against Activists and Indigenous Australians. I went to an exhibition of photgraphed ASIO agents spying on activists. Hilarious what my tax money is spent on. Now they want to have power not only to spy BUT INFECT WITH VIRUSES? They want the power to cause malicius damage to hippies computers?


Try being one of the hippies they target! It is an odd feeling being surveiled and spied on. Guess I should stop having a social conscience huh!






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