My LittleBig Rant

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posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 12:17 AM
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I know this has been said a million times over, in countless threads, but it seems like it just can't be said enough.

If you ignore or shut someone out because their opinions/beliefs/ideologies differ from yours, you are placing a limit on yourself through your own close-mindedness. It's selfish, juvenile and ignorant. How likely is it that you're right all the time? Or that you're right about all within a given topic? Or that your "way" is without flaw? You could be harboring a false, preconceived notion or a fallacy that's so deeply engrained into the fiber of your being that you believe it to be fact/truth and never even realize it. In fact, I would venture to say that we all fall victim to this in some way or at some point. It's ok to be wrong... really.. it is. Humankind didn't come this far without frequent error and failure... and yes.. they were mocked and ridiculed along the way.
We have an ocean of unpleasantries before us that will never be resolved if we remain so divided with our hearts and minds closed.

If you agree with this, good, but do me a favor.. Instead of applying this to others in your head.. apply it to yourself. Not kidding... do it.. right now.... because your flaws are what needs to be worked on.. not everybody else'.

Stifle the ego! Rise above the heat of the moment! End the "end-all-be-all" mentality!

There... just had to get that off my chest.

Captain Convolution over and out.




posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 01:18 AM
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reply to post by Generator85
 



You could be harboring a false, preconceived notion or a fallacy that's so deeply engrained into the fiber of your being that you believe it to be fact/truth and never even realize it


- French fries aren't from France.
- Napoleon wasn't short.
- Peanuts aren't nuts.
- The color red doesn't make bulls mad.
- Your hair and fingernails do not continue growing after you die.

"Beam me up, Scotty"
"Just the facts, ma'am"
"It's elementary, my dear Watson"
"Luke, I am your father"
"Play it again, Sam"
"We don't need no stinkin' badges!" are actually mis-quotes and were never used in any series or movie..



But seriously, you make a good point


Peace



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 01:32 AM
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reply to post by operation mindcrime
 


Exactly! Thanks!

They can be even more fundamental, and more deeply rooted than that... which can screw with our subconscious and spill into the way we perceive things. i.e. stereotyping.

Or maybe someone's father told them it's possible for water to flow up hill, leaving out the aid of a pump, and that person goes on thinking for some time that water can flow uphill.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 02:01 AM
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Originally posted by Generator85
They can be even more fundamental, and more deeply rooted than that... which can screw with our subconscious and spill into the way we perceive things. i.e. stereotyping.


Obviously you were talking about more fundamental issues and my example was a poor attempt at trying to be funny. I am very skeptical by nature but that doesn't mean I hold to my perspective at the expense of (possibly valid) alternative view points. Keeping a neutral point of view enables you to learn something.


Or maybe someone's father told them it's possible for water to flow up hill, leaving out the aid of a pump, and that person goes on thinking for some time that water can flow uphill.


Maybe water can flow uphill.......


Peace



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 03:34 AM
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reply to post by operation mindcrime
 


Apparently the Chinese managed just that back in the 1800-early 1900 goldrush in Australia.

Meanwhile check this ..

Rolling -uphill

or this ...

mining blog

I'm sure you can find even more. Quite fascinating and ingenious.
edit on 13-1-2013 by Timely because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 03:58 AM
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reply to post by Timely
 


That's really cool. Thanks for sharing that.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 04:37 AM
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reply to post by Generator85
 


i have always enjoyed a good drunken brawl amongst friends, and as a kid my enemy's. and i will tell you this, i always learn more from losing than winning, as an adult i carry this ideal when it comes to the battle of words. but just as physical fighting no one wants to back down until they are completely inept. the problem with the battle of words is when you are defeated there is no physical pain that makes you want to stop and reflect. from what i see when one loses the battle of words one only wants to keep fighting, because words are wind, and dont leave one sore the next day.

all of us, pacifists or not, would do well to study the art of physical combat, it will teach us about mental combat, cause in the end a physical confrontation is a mental confrontation that has immediate results.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 05:16 AM
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reply to post by DocHolidaze
 


I think I can agree with that to some extent. I think havin' your butt whooped a time or two can teach you something that words just can't.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 11:41 AM
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If you can't admit you're wrong, you'll never learn.

I'm wrong all the time. Everyone tells me so. And you know....sometimes they're right.

And understanding that, helps me make me a better person.

What was it Socrates said? "The unexamined life isn't worth living?"

S&F



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 05:26 PM
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Some ideologies don't have a right and a wrong side in the absolute sense, unlike random trivia, and one is capable of understanding both mindsets but still agree with only one because the other side sounds completely objectionable. It's unfortunate that those disagreements can cloud one's opinion of the actual person. Even that I can understand, though, because ideologies lead to actions, and those actions can potentially cause harm.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 08:14 PM
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This is a VERY good topic. Personally, the ability of those around me to admit when theyre wrong plays a huge role in my ability to interact with them. Someone who refuses to admit they were wrong or that someone they were in a debate with knew better seems to rank very low when it comes to keeping my attention.

I should also add something to this. When someone does admit they are wrong and the person who was right then trumpets from the rooftops that they were right, thats the same mentality to me as someone who refuses to admit wrong. This might even play a large role in peoples ability to admit wrong. Are you someone that says "WHAT? You didnt know THAT?"?
edit on 13-1-2013 by Mcfly682 because: Addition



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by Mcfly682
 


Excellent point. To a lot of people, it would seem, the importance of being right or "winning" an argument is more important than the original topic. How can we come to any reasonable solutions if we continually and consistently revert to immaturity!? A bunch of adult infants, the lot.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 08:44 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
What was it Socrates said? "The unexamined life isn't worth living?"


Who needs to examine their lives when we have Apple products?


Not enough people take the time to consider things beyond the face value, it seems.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by Mcfly682
 


You're probably right. Fear of being judged rather than pride could indeed be behind the reluctance to admit to an error in thinking. (But it is most certainly pride that is behind my parents' allergy to being wrong about stuff.)
Though I'll admit... I get all tingly with satisfaction when I am told I'm right. It's like a self-esteem massage.

edit on 13-1-2013 by EllaMarina because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 05:52 AM
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I think you have made some very good points!





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