how to defeat infrared night vision and other SHTF tips

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posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 01:04 AM
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For a college course I got to see some video of police thermal imaging. This was the mid to late 90s so it could be better now, but they had trouble seeing through trees, especially pine trees.




posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 01:09 AM
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reply to post by tinhattribunal
 


I think that guy writing is really confused, his whole breakdown on how to defeat night vision is pretty funny. I also heard if you cover your eyes they can't see you

But the boarder crossing stuff? You know you can actually walk through the boarder right? People do it everyday.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 01:12 AM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


Oh, I'm just condescending to those who post information that is catigoricly false, claiming it is fact and thinking that what they saw on Predator or CSI is what happens in the real world spouting it off to sound all knowledgeable.

When something moves in the water it disrupts the thermal boundary layers and an obvious thermally contrasting wake or disturbed area is left, even if the person/animal is below the surface. Operators (at least good ones) are trained to recognize this. Also, as soon as you pop your head up, it's a bright hot spot in the middle of a (generally) featureless scene.

Of course as always there are things you can take advantage of. If the observer's perspective is at a point where your position is in the reflection of the shore features your thermal image can be significantly obscured. This is because water is both emissive and reflective in the thermal infrared portion of the spectrum. This means that the temperature of objects reflected in the water is added to the temperature of the water itself and so appear much hotter than they actually are when viewed directly. Because most shorelines are lined with trees, the reflected shore image creates a high temperature, highly mottled scene, acting somewhat like camouflage.
edit on 13-1-2013 by dainoyfb because: of more typos.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 01:32 AM
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Well maybe it DOES work, just not the way he thinks.
Now lets say the military is flying around at night looking for people on the ground. Maybe they will think that guy running around in a plastic cape is mentally retarded and they just let him go because they assume he will starve to death soon.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 03:37 AM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


Do you know any tricks for helicopters out of audible range? Is there some kind of detector you can use?



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 04:51 AM
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Originally posted by cdesigns
I used to own a $20,000 thermal camera and you can hide from it behind a glass, it cant see thru glass.


I noticed that too on some thermal image footage of a car chase. You could see heat sources on the car but not the driver because he had the window up. When he opened the door to run you could then see him clearly.

It picks up the temperature of the glass, not what's behind it.
edit on 13/1/13 by NuclearPaul because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 

There, that wasn't so hard now was it? Yah, you have to come up for air. Its a trick. If a helicopter suddenly appeared overhead you could slip into a river or lake, whatever and hide along the bank (if there was undergrowth). As long as you had a lot of foliage over the top of your head or if you breathe with your mouth just above the water line youi signature is greatly reduced. In a river or "urgling brook" the motion of the current would also help to confuse the IR sensors in the camera. Anyone who didn't know you were there might think you were a small animal say unless highly trained, or the only expert like you.;


I saw a car chase on video once and the car was "hot" on the FLIR. It splashed into an aqueduct and disappeared from the camera view. The operator switched to visible spectrum and turned on the spotlight to see "better".



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 08:25 AM
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reply to post by SrWingCommander
 


For a college course I got to see some video of police thermal imaging. This was the mid to late 90s so it could be better now, but they had trouble seeing through trees, especially pine trees.

Because the foliage is "overhead" and the light (heat) emanating from your body can't be seen behind the canopy if it is thick enough. Maybe the pine needles are the most effective blocking the heat signature? Leaves on trees might have gaps and your signature would be filtering thru.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 08:28 AM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


Wow, I can't handle the level of complete BS I'm seeing in almost every sentence in this thread so far. If you don't know what you're talking about then don't post it as fact. I own a thermal imager and I will happily go about making you look like a fool just to teach you not to post crap.

Thats as about as "I'm the only expert" as it gets. Chill.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 09:17 AM
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Originally posted by Cinrad

Do you know any tricks for helicopters out of audible range? Is there some kind of detector you can use?




Just a little heads up -- audible range can be a very short distance. The helicopter that played Mexican standoff with me was a few hundred feet away and I did not hear it. It's a shock when total fu*kups are in possession of this type of technology.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by Cinrad
 

Good luck with that. Things are lethal, day or night...




posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 
reply to post by dainoyfb
 




I would like to hear the experts comment on this;
"A DIY Hat To Prevent Your Visibility On Cameras And Video"
from this site;
www.secretsofthefed.com...
edit on 13-1-2013 by tanda7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 07:18 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
Thats as about as "I'm the only expert" as it gets. Chill.


I am the only expert on here so far. Everybody else is posting assumptions. Most of those assumptions are incorrect yet they are being stated as fact. You are the worst offender here. I don't know why you feel you should carry on offering false advice when it is obvious that you have no experience with the subject matter what soever. It's doing considerable damage by feeding inaccurate information to people who are genuinely interested in learning the truth and it goes against everything that ATS try's to accomplish.

One thing you will never see me do is post something as fact that I have not researched thoroughly and know for certain is true. Too many people here post what they think they know without making sure it is true first. If you are not certain that your information is correct then at least say so. Don't pawn it off as fact so that you can take pride in sounding like you are knowledgeable. Take pride in your effort to post truthful information that people can count on.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 07:25 PM
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Originally posted by Sovaka
Didn't Mythbusters also prove that glass stops NightVision/FLIR ?


Yup, but so does cardboard, styrofoam, a towel, etc, etc, etc. which are not as heavy, not as breakable and not shiny. In fact almost anything solid will work. Thermal imaging is not magic. It can not see through most things.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 08:01 PM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


I am the only expert on here so far. Everybody else is posting assumptions.

There you go as gain. You are the only expert...

Too full of yourself. But whatever.

intrptr bows, kneels... backs out of the room, kneeling and bowing.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 09:08 PM
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reply to post by tanda7
 


Hi Tanda, Your link is not working. Would you try again please.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 09:30 PM
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reply to post by Cinrad
 


Thermal imaging and image intensifier based night vision is passive (generally). This means that there is nothing being emitted from the devices, so there is nothing to detect. When the laser designator comes on to give the Hellfire missile something to aim at then you can easily detect that. You'll have a few seconds to find a lot of cover. That's if they use a Hellfire. Caveat there too - some Hellfire variants now don't use laser guidance. There is nothing that I am aware of that is affordable to the common person and which significantly helps to extend the detection of an approaching helicopter. The helicopter remains an effective sneak attack platform.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 09:47 PM
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Just cover yourself in mud, worked for Arnold.



posted on Jan, 13 2013 @ 10:31 PM
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reply to post by tanda7
 

Your link was "not found" but I think I found what you were referring to?

www.facebook.com...

illuminated hat

A light on a hat will blind the camera to your identity, not your presence. And if monitored, the "fed" may want to know why...

I think it would work to spoil facial recognition software as well. Still a red flag to the "watchers". You might do better to "disguise your person" without looking like it. Wearing a hat with a brim or a cap with visor. Grow a beard. Wear sunglasses. All these things confuse software designed to recognize you by your features. That way you just blend in with a crowd, instead of looking like a beacon.

Of course, I'm not an expert...



posted on Jan, 14 2013 @ 12:50 AM
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Originally posted by dainoyfb
Wow, I can't handle the level of complete BS I'm seeing in almost every sentence in this thread so far. If you don't know what you're talking about then don't post it as fact.

First, the quoted information in the OP is a complete lie, probably by somebody who wants you to think you're sneaking through security unseen. A thermal imager cannot see through very many things at all but the ONE thing it can see through is thin plastic sheeting.


Thanks for the clarification. Check out the video here backing up what you're saying:

www.youtube.com...

My understanding is that radiant heat energy is electromagnetic waves caused by the movement of the particles caused by heat. It follows that the sympathetic movements of electrons through a reflective metal (like a mirror) would also reflect them as, as we see in that video.





 
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