Another Rock on Mars! maybe...

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posted on Jan, 10 2013 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by Cynicaleye
 


Thanks, that cleared everything right up.




posted on Jan, 10 2013 @ 11:01 PM
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I couldn't see anything at first and thought I could use some creativity so I stuck a firecracker up my nostril and now I can see all kinds of weird crap.



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 01:33 AM
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reply to post by Jocko Flocko
 


Dude, don't you know that snorting fireworks, leads to smoking crackers



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 02:06 AM
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reply to post by iCEdTenG
 


Oh no! Don't use the dreaded eye roll emoticon
edit on 11-1-2013 by Cynicaleye because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by LeLeu
 


It also leaves one heck of a bad smell in your, well, nose...

But seriously, I think I have a vision issue because after all of these threads regarding "Mars anomalies" I have yet to see anything that remotely resembles what the author says he can see...



There are however quite a large amount of interesting geological features I have seen on the Mars surface, but nothing that could be labeled as being manufactured. What is fascinating to me are the MASSIVE geological events and upheavals that have taken place on Mars, especially ancient water and volcanic activity. What could lay under the surface of Mars is extremely interesting to say the least.
edit on 11-1-2013 by Jocko Flocko because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by Jocko Flocko
 


I agree with you. Some nasty things have happened to Mars its a bit of a wreck.
I like to think that Mars was a second Earth that once had a warmer climate, flowing water and it's own flora and fauna. Once a human colony has been established there hopefully we'll find fossils, but I doubt they will be found on a pic from the rovers.

Having spent the first 30 years of my life thinking there were structures on Mars, Cydonia was a kick in the balls. But the bigger picture where Mars was once teeming with life, to me is still very interesting.



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by LeLeu
 


I think of the amazing amount of underground caves that have been discovered here on Earth, take Lechuguilla Cave for example, a massive labyrinth of caverns and spectacular formations. Most of the cave was formed from sulfuric acid and I would imagine due to volcanic activity on Mars the same chemical is quite abundant. With Mars's amazingly turbulent past I can't imagine what might await an adventurer who sets foot under the surface of mars for the very first time. With such an unbelievable amount of water that cut it's way into the martian rock, it wouldn't surprise me in the least if an explorer were to find massive underground lakes heated by thermal vents that are teaming with either microbial life or some type of "fish"...





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