Vitamin C - What You Don't Know May Kill You AND Why The USDA is Wrong

page: 7
185
<< 4  5  6    8  9  10 >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 02:52 PM
link   
reply to post by Julie Washington
 


I can’t find sunflower lecithin granules. The sunflower lecithin seems it is always in capsules. Only soy lecithin is in granules. Can someone post a link with sunflower lecithin granules if you have found any please?




posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 02:54 PM
link   
Thank-you for this thread, OP. I have convinced my significant other that it is indeed important to correct our Vitamin C levels.

Along with another thread on the subject I am now using this information to order the items needed to create Liposomal Vitamin C.

Thank-you again.

oddpenguin



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 02:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by nedined
reply to post by Julie Washington
 


I can’t find sunflower lecithin granules. The sunflower lecithin seems it is always in capsules. Only soy lecithin is in granules. Can someone post a link with sunflower lecithin granules if you have found any please?


I have only found sunflower lecithin in liquid/gel form. I am not sure it id made in powdered form.



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:08 PM
link   
reply to post by oddpenguin
 


Yes, me too. This is so far the best I found: Sunflower Lecithin 1200mg Non GMO - 200 Softgels

Is there a recipe for how to use these soft gels in the making of the Liposomal Vit C?



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:25 PM
link   
This is in response to the questions about why in the past that Vitamin C wasn't such an issue.

Declining Nutrition of Fruits and Vegetables

"...Actually, there is some evidence that the fruits and vegetables available to most people today don't contain the nutritional value they had about 40 or 50 years ago."


In 2004, a University of Texas research team headed by biochemist Donald Davis, Ph.D., analyzed a U.S. Department of Agriculture report on 43 common garden fruits and vegetables and found that almost half of the substances containing minerals important to good health had lost some nutritional value.


Why Did This Happen

"...the nutritional value in some produce was diluted through faster methods major agro-farm companies employed to grow high-yield crops to meet consumer demand."


According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient data, calcium content of broccoli which averaged 12.9 milligrams per gram of dry weight in 1950, had declined to only 4.4 mg/g dry weight in 2003


So in broccoli alone, the nutrient value has declined 60% in 50 years.


And in a study of much longer duration, Davis reported that in wheat and barley crops, protein concentrations declined by 30 to 50 percent between the years 1938 and 1990.


This is why we can't get enough vitamins in our diet!

Oh, then bring home that broccoli and cook it and it loses another 30% of it's nutrients.

I recomment reading this link:
Source
edit on 11-1-2013 by Julie Washington because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:27 PM
link   
reply to post by Julie Washington
 


This is just the beginning. If you want to investigate further you will find that many of our favorite foods drain our bodies of necessary vitamins and minerals.

If you want to avoid all of this just eat a healthy balanced diet. NO processed foods, oils or any type of animal products.

If you are not willing to do that you are just pissing in the wind.



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:33 PM
link   
reply to post by Julie Washington
 


Very interesting read Julie, thanks for posting. My questions is what is the cheapest ($) way to get these benefits? I watched some videos on youtube and these people have like a $100 machine they pour it into and then they add liposomal and ascorbic acid, which probably cost a bit themselves. I know price shouldnt be a factor, especially for those who are seriously ill, but as someone who doesnt have much extra money each week but is interested in trying this out, are their cheaper machines or alternatives to creating this? A breakdown of what it would cost would be great, thanks.



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:34 PM
link   
reply to post by Julie Washington
 


They are not trying to kill you or harm you the average in take of vitamin C is around 600-1000 mg a day (max-2000), since most foods and drinks contain some form of Vitamin C. So most people are getting more. The USDA advises so little, because it is basic protection against scurvy and it is not for malicious intent... That is none-sense. Too much vitamin C can cause some bad things to happen to the body as well, as to much of anything is a bad thing.


If you do take a supplement, do not get more than 2000 mg/day of vitamin C from foods and supplements. Although excess vitamin C is mostly eliminated in the urine, high doses can cause headaches, frequent urination, diarrhea, and nausea. People with a history of kidney stones should avoid high levels of vitamin C.
University of Florida



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:37 PM
link   
Ok, I finally found this: Raw Sunflower Lecithin - LRF
Will this work the same way as the granular soy lecithin?



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by tehdouglas
reply to post by Julie Washington
 


Very interesting read Julie, thanks for posting. My questions is what is the cheapest ($) way to get these benefits? I watched some videos on youtube and these people have like a $100 machine they pour it into and then they add liposomal and ascorbic acid, which probably cost a bit themselves. I know price shouldnt be a factor, especially for those who are seriously ill, but as someone who doesnt have much extra money each week but is interested in trying this out, are their cheaper machines or alternatives to creating this? A breakdown of what it would cost would be great, thanks.


Either repost your question in the I Make My Own Liposomal Vitamin C thread (which is linked in my signature) or read that thread and you will find your answers. Be sure to post your location because the answers are different for US vs Canada vs Europe.



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by TheMythLives
reply to post by Julie Washington
 


They are not trying to kill you or harm you the average in take of vitamin C is around 600-1000 mg a day (max-2000), since most foods and drinks contain some form of Vitamin C. So most people are getting more. The USDA advises so little, because it is basic protection against scurvy and it is not for malicious intent... That is none-sense. Too much vitamin C can cause some bad things to happen to the body as well, as to much of anything is a bad thing.


If you do take a supplement, do not get more than 2000 mg/day of vitamin C from foods and supplements. Although excess vitamin C is mostly eliminated in the urine, high doses can cause headaches, frequent urination, diarrhea, and nausea. People with a history of kidney stones should avoid high levels of vitamin C.
University of Florida


I never said the USDA was trying to kill you


Also the warnings above do not apply to this thread. Those warnings are for over the counter supplements, not liposomal Vitamin C.



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:49 PM
link   
Wonderful!

Can we get some love for blood oranges? They have more vitamin c than regular oranges and since eating them fresh I've been feeling quite amazing in terms of stress and general well-being. Juice definitely does NOT do it.

Even though you may have to eat quite a bit of them, high vitamin c fruits are worth it! We can benefit from them!



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:55 PM
link   
How about drinking a gallon of orange juice everyday? How big a difference?



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 04:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by Mugen
How about drinking a gallon of orange juice everyday? How big a difference?



No, won't work.

Your body won't absorb all the vitamin c and it will most likely give you diarrhea.



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 04:49 PM
link   
I'm willing to give it a shot but I want to toss in my 2 cents here about some of the back and forth about our ancestors diets. One thing you have to ask is who is to say if even our ancestors were getting the optimal amount of vitamin c? Just because people have survived and seemingly thrived does not mean it couldn't have been improved upon.

The human body is very resilient and can survive and adapt to unhealthy conditions. Look at how many people have conditions that are not detectable at first glance. They can go on and lead very normal and productive lives. Does that mean they were in optimum health? A house with a leaky roof or a drafty window can still serve it's purpose yet it would be nice to patch that leak and get new windows.

I think there is a difference between surviving, thriving and optimal states. We can get enough vitamin c from our current diet to survive and probably somewhat thrive but not to reach the optimal states whatever they may be. Well that's how I see it anyway.



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 04:50 PM
link   
Epic OP..
As someone who takes multivitamins, b100, fish oil and echinacea daily, this is of huge interest to me. Will look more into and will read this whole thread when I got time.



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 04:54 PM
link   

Originally posted by buddhasystem

Originally posted by UnderGetty
Vitamin C is a strong anti-oxidant and as such, degrades rapidly. There are a number of factors that contribute to our inability to obtain sufficient quantities naturally.

1. The fresh produce we eat is not fresh enough. By the time it gets into our mouths, the food has lost most of it's VC.


Again and again, the issue I was asking about was this: how did our ancestors get vitamin C in sufficient quantities without buying supplements, say 200,000 years ago. And the "produce" they were getting was far from fresh. They usually didn't have "Wild by Nature" stores just next door to their caves. Sure there were greens during the summer and the meat does have C, but at the same time they had to scavenge, meaning whatever food they had was not always fresh off the vine. Making any judgement about how much C they consumed on the basis of presumed "freshness" just doesn't hold water.


2. The modern food we grow has been bred to minimise VC content in an effort to make it more appealing to our palates.


Care to provide a link to where a producer of food is hard at work to reduce the C content?


2. Our palates develop from early childhood to accept sweet and salty foods. Foods high in VC are usually sour, astringent which our palate rejects.


That's not always true at all. Many people like lemons. Orange juice? Heck, even potatoes have Vitamin C. The food does NOT have to be sour to qualify as a C source. That's just ridiculous.


3. Our daily requirement for VC varies depending on the environmental stresses we experience.
Our modern immune systems have not matured fully due to our diet and medical intervention. This places the immune system under greater stress than would otherwise be.
Our modern lifestyle is more emotionally stressful, which further suppresses our immune systems and other physiological systems.


Really??? With worse sanitary conditions, decease control and general dismal state of human condition in the past, it's moot to claim that people lived stress-free and healthier lives in the past.


For most of us, the requirements for VC in our modern world far outweighs the ability for our modern diet to supply.


Again, this is an arbitrary statement, and faith-based at that.



Remember VC is an acid. Many minerals (like Zinc) are metals. What does acid do to metals (think battery acid and the body of your car)? What do you think happens when an acid and a metal are combined in a pill?


Hey look, you claim knowledge of chemistry and what not, and then you post THIS. Seriously. Trying to scare people with acid in the car battery? Come on. The Zinc supplements contain this metal as a salt, such as sulfate. It's not in its metal form anymore. Why do you feel compelled to post such nonsense?


For being so highly critical, you make a lot of assertions and use a lot of conjecture to refute an argument... (See your answer to number 1).



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 05:16 PM
link   
up yozr vitamin c intake and go through winter without getting sick



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 05:23 PM
link   

Originally posted by buddhasystem

It has been asked a few times indeed, but you don't need to apologize because there hasn't been a satisfactory answer.



Only for those who can't read...


Originally posted by buddhasystem

Those who obsess with the cure-for-all, panacea type of supplements will distort logic beyond any reasonable limits, to justify their beliefs (in this case, their faith in Vitamin C). And so the following pseudo-science toolkit is used:

a) claims are made that our ancestors had easy access to mega-doses of Vitamin C, in a form that was easily digested. There is nothing to support this claim, of course.



1) Nobody said it was a cure all or panacea... only that it has shown by numerous rigorous clinical studies and copious anecdotal reports to have some significant benefits for quite a few (not all) and this suggests that supplementing the standard american diet with more Vitamin C is a good thing...

2) Nobody ever said they had easy access to mega doses... Those are your words. A satisfactory hypothesis for why today's standard american diet comes short compared to a hypothetical historical dietary amount of vitamin C has already been put forward. It is a more reasonable assertion than the one you make.


Originally posted by buddhasystem

b) claims that our ancestors lived healthy and stress-free lives, and so needed less Vitamin C than us. The fact that there were lots more infections and the quality of food was lacking most of the time is disregarded wholesale.



So you are an expert on what our ancestors ate and the quality and quantity of it? And who said anything about stress free? I don't think anyone on this forum thinks it was an idyllic lifestyle.

This thread's scientifically unproven assertion is that 1000's of years ago there was more bioavailable vitamin C in the human diet. However, even without empirical data to back it up, this conclusion is a logical step to take considering the degree of pollution with which we've contaminated ourselves and the depleted soil conditions that we have created...

The scientifically explored assertion is that over the last 75-100 yrs (I would say longer - but it isn't empirically provable) the nutrient content of our food has declined markedly...

So what about that do you have a problem understanding?

edit on 11-1-2013 by JimmyNeutron because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-1-2013 by JimmyNeutron because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-1-2013 by JimmyNeutron because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 05:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by Julie Washington



Be sure to add some Niacin B3 for the depression. Did you see the video about it in the OP?

Hope it helps



Just an added comment - the Niacin should come from Nicotinic Acid (the kind that makes you flush) and not niacinimide...





top topics
 
185
<< 4  5  6    8  9  10 >>

log in

join