Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Most Distant Star Explosion Found 10 billion light-years from Earth

page: 1
0

log in

join

posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 02:03 PM
link   
The supernova is known as SN SCP-0401 and has been characterized Type 1a supernova , it will give astronomers a chance to study the effect of dark energy just 3.7 billion years after the Big bang and see if it has changed over time .



"This is the most distant supernova anyone has ever found for doing dependable cosmology," David Rubin, of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley, said in a statement.


The most important unanswered question we have about the nature of dark energy is whether it varies over time — whether it affects the expansion of the universe differently in different eras," Rubin added. "With SN SCP-0401, we have the first example of a well-measured supernova sufficiently far away to study the expansion history of the universe from almost 10 billion years ago
www.space.com...


Amazing




posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 02:13 PM
link   
Considering the gravitational pull and the speed of light, that star exploded a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away...

And only now did we sense a disturbance in the Force.
edit on 9-1-2013 by AfterInfinity because: Capitalizing the 'f'. The grammar is strong within me.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 02:19 PM
link   
Seriously...WTF? I am just shaking my head because even though I have read many many threads about stuff like this on here before I still can't wrap my head around at how #ing large this universe is. I only hope to when I pass along that I can view the wonders that are out there.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 02:20 PM
link   
I like how they say "just 3.7 billion years after the big bang"



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 02:48 PM
link   
sorry read thread wrong my apologies
edit on 9-1-2013 by ed1320 because: (no reason given)
edit on 9-1-2013 by ed1320 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 02:54 PM
link   
Ok now i think i know what i was going to ask. If the universe is only 13.7 billion years old how is it over 150 billion light years in diameter. Did something go faster than the speed of light. Shouldnt it only have a radius of 13.7 billion light years it confuses the hell out of me.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 03:06 PM
link   
reply to post by ed1320
 


The universe did expand much faster than the speed of light, for the first tiny fraction of a second of its existence -- during the Inflation Epoch.

However, the universe was empty at the time, save for the inflation field. The universe was already exceptionally large (possibly even infinite) by the time the forces decoupled and structures began to form. 10 billion years ago, this particular star was 10 billion light-years away when it went supernova. Its light is just now reaching us, and the supernova itself (if it still existed) would now be a further 20 billion light-years away due to the continued expansion of space.





new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join



atslive.com

hi-def

low-def