How we see color

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posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 04:57 AM
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If you don't know how we see in color this TED talk video is a very good layman's description of the process from wavelength through the retina to the brain.





posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 05:38 AM
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It's all about the RGB man!

I wonder what role's geometry play in regards to RGB waves being reflected from:
Super Blue Berry: The Natural World’s Most Intense Color





Oh wait, answered my own question lol.

www.wired.com...

Optically awesome!




The Mystery of Circular Polarization

As seen above, the same cross-section of a berry produces circular polarized light that spirals to the left (figure A) and to the right (figure B). (In figure C, they're combined.) Why a berry should produce any circular polarized light at all, however, is an open question.

As best as scientists know, only one creature -- strange, sea-dwelling crustaceans called mantis shrimps -- can see CPL wavelengths. Their appearance in this terrestrial berry could hint at as-yet-unidentified powers of perception: Perhaps insects or birds or some other African animal can perceive CPL, and for whatever reason the berries benefit from detection. Or maybe CPL is simply a side effect of cellulose layers arranged to generate optimal shades of visible colors.

"We don't know the answer," Steiner said.


I want answers!

@happykat39: The re's a lot of cool stuff on TED in regards to synesthesia, visuospatial memory, place cells and plasticity... for the most part, if you are to youtube "TED Brain", it will provide many of the videos I'm referencing.

I find the most interesting part is, what happens in the brain after presented with a stimuli.

Check out synesthesia if you're not familiar, it's amazing stuff.

edit on 9-1-2013 by retirednature because: clarity
edit on 9-1-2013 by retirednature because: sp
edit on 9-1-2013 by retirednature because: additional comment



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 07:33 AM
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Originally posted by retirednature
It's all about the RGB man!

I wonder what role's geometry play in regards to RGB waves being reflected from:
Super Blue Berry: The Natural World’s Most Intense Color





Oh wait, answered my own question lol.

www.wired.com...

Optically awesome!




The Mystery of Circular Polarization

As seen above, the same cross-section of a berry produces circular polarized light that spirals to the left (figure A) and to the right (figure B). (In figure C, they're combined.) Why a berry should produce any circular polarized light at all, however, is an open question.

As best as scientists know, only one creature -- strange, sea-dwelling crustaceans called mantis shrimps -- can see CPL wavelengths. Their appearance in this terrestrial berry could hint at as-yet-unidentified powers of perception: Perhaps insects or birds or some other African animal can perceive CPL, and for whatever reason the berries benefit from detection. Or maybe CPL is simply a side effect of cellulose layers arranged to generate optimal shades of visible colors.

"We don't know the answer," Steiner said.


I want answers!

@happykat39: The re's a lot of cool stuff on TED in regards to synesthesia, visuospatial memory, place cells and plasticity... for the most part, if you are to youtube "TED Brain", it will provide many of the videos I'm referencing.

I find the most interesting part is, what happens in the brain after presented with a stimuli.

Check out synesthesia if you're not familiar, it's amazing stuff.

edit on 9-1-2013 by retirednature because: clarity
edit on 9-1-2013 by retirednature because: sp
edit on 9-1-2013 by retirednature because: additional comment


I have seen those Berries before and they are indeed strange color wise. I wrote an article on polarizers for photography that explains the differences between linear and circular polarizers and why some digital cameras need a circular polarizer or they wont work right. The title is "Polarizers Explained". it can be read at my website by clicking on the link in the previous sentence.

I like the TED Talk series and watch a lot of them as time allows. One of the best I have seen is one by Mike Rowe of the series "Dirty Jobs". You can watch it HERE.

I do know what synesthesia is. A very good book on it is "The Man Who Mistook His Hife For a Hat" and it is still availaqble at Amazon.





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