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They Never Would Have Sent Deke Slayton Into Space, The Space Program Was A Hoodwink

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posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 09:30 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
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thinking about the slayton story a little more you realize the thing must be fake all the more, someone so young, why is he not tachycardic when in fib? if he was in fib 2 X per month why no digoxin, see, all of Apollo unravels instantly, Chris do you have any idea who first discovered this aspect of the "hood wink"




posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 10:09 PM
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Originally posted by chrisbobsonDeke Slayton was diagnosed with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation(PAF). Because of this he could not not serve as an astronaut that flew. His illness forced him into a desk job where he became the "astronaut boss". He later was deemed "cured" and sent into space well after the conclusion of the Apollo Program. Atrial fibrillation is not curable and I along with others have concluded on this basis that the space Missions were faked.


Agreed. If the Deke had a weak heart,, and he was grounded for so many years, then sending him into space was a seriously bad medical risk. It would also be a serious operational hazard to his fellow crew mates.

There are plenty of other healthy astronaut candidates in 1975. Somehow, Deke, with his weak heart, gets approved.


A long medical program[clarification needed] led to Slayton being restored to full flight status in 1972, when he was selected as docking module pilot for the Apollo–Soyuz Test Project, a docking between the American Apollo spacecraft and the Soyuz spacecraft of the Soviet Union. On July 17, 1975... Source en.wikipedia.org...


What kind of idiot doctor would send a man with a bad heart into space?
Was it this guy?
edit on 1/11/2013 by SayonaraJupiter because: add link for my sources



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 11:28 PM
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reply to post by SayonaraJupiter
 


that is the crux isn't it sj? assume the man really and truly has fib, would any competent physician send the guy, NO, the whole thing is exposed there at once, hoodwink
edit on 11-1-2013 by gingerlee because: post empty, wrote over



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 01:07 AM
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Originally posted by gingerlee
reply to post by SayonaraJupiter
 


that is the crux isn't it sj? assume the man really and truly has fib, would any competent physician send the guy, NO, the whole thing is exposed there at once, hoodwink
edit on 11-1-2013 by gingerlee because: post empty, wrote over


Deke had a bad heart. There were many other astronauts waiting in the wings who were more physically fit than Deke. The selection of Deke is a huge medical risk. It doesn't make sense.



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 02:48 AM
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Originally posted by gingerlee
reply to post by Bedlam
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thinking about the slayton story a little more you realize the thing must be fake all the more, someone so young, why is he not tachycardic when in fib? if he was in fib 2 X per month why no digoxin, see, all of Apollo unravels instantly, Chris do you have any idea who first discovered this aspect of the "hood wink"




Not everyone with afib is tachycardic. I am in RVR when mine happens but a big percentage of people are not.



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 03:34 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


most young people with afib will get tachy, the point about slayton was you'd want to load a person like that with a slowing agent, and say he didn't get tachy, that would mean for a young guy like that an additional conduction disease problem, any way you slice it he's not rescuable from this very bad lie or should I say gigantic fib
edit on 12-1-2013 by gingerlee because: spelling



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 03:37 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


right there you just proved Apollo a hood wink, how could a doc allow you to be trying to land a LM in RVR . see? the whole thing is fake , your own experience proves it



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 03:51 AM
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He wasn't trying to land an LM, he was docking with Soyuz and never left Earth orbit.

It depends on the type of afib he had. There are some types that are caused by an underlying condition, and if you treat said condition, the afib will go away. If that was the case, then there was little or no risk to him flying later, after they had treated the other condition. .
edit on 1/12/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:00 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


same difference, no competent physician would entertain for a moment the idea of allowing you to operate a space craft in RVR, low pressure, pulmonary edema, syncope and so forth, they wouldn't let you dock, nor would they allow slayton, it is all fake and your very own experience proves it
edit on 12-1-2013 by gingerlee because: spelling
edit on 12-1-2013 by gingerlee because: SPELL



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:00 AM
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POSTED TWICE FOR SOME REASON
edit on 12-1-2013 by gingerlee because: DOUBLE POST



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:01 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


slayton had idiopathic paroxysmal a fib, that is unambiguous, read his own books



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:09 AM
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reply to post by gingerlee
 


Idiopathic means they don't know the underlying cause. Which means that it very well could have been caused by something else, and over time it went away. They rarely use the term anymore, but at the time it was a catch all for "We don't know what's causing this" used by the medical field. Paroxysmal means that it converts back to normal by itself, without any intervention.


However, even though the conventional
classification is idiopathic, it appears that in some cases so-called idiopathic AF may
in fact be caused by nutritional deficiencies. See my separate article about this.
Moreover, in other cases the AF is triggered by various factors (for example,
ingesting food containing MSG (monosodium glutamate), drinking alcohol, or
drinking caffeinated beverages), and can be avoided by avoiding these triggers.

www.afibbers.org...
edit on 1/12/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)
edit on 1/12/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:13 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


You don't understand the semantics nor the medicine nor the problem, ask your own doctor, without an ablation , which was not available at the time slaytons risk would have been ongoing, slaytons doctors claimed the problem just went away, slayton claimed it was vitamins that cured his conduction system



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:20 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


if you are trying to employ an academic approach in proving me wrong here, it will not go as you wish, the medicine is all on the side of Chris' original presentation, ask your own doc, "doc, if I had PAF twice a month with associated RVR, and I was not on a slowing agent and not anticoagulated, would you let me fly a space ship?"


all physicians familiar with the problem would tell you absolutely NO, the story was made up
edit on 12-1-2013 by gingerlee because: spelling



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:20 AM
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reply to post by gingerlee
 


And again, idiopathic just means they don't know what causes the afib to happen. That doesn't mean that there isn't an underlying condition causing it. A study done in 2007 of 248 people (89% with paroxysmal afib) showed that 30% of people with paroxysmal afib were cured or suffered significantly fewer episodes just by changing their diets. If they used drugs or other treatments as well, it went up to 55%. By adding supplements 25% had the same results, and 53% with drugs or other treatments and supplements. So yes, it's entirely possible that he fell within that group and it did go away with vitamins.



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:27 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


the term "idiopathic" does not mean the underlying problem is not understood, you are incorrect, it means the problem is in fact due to conduction system disease in and of itself and not secondary to high thyroid levels, excess catecholamines or what not, idiopathic means primary conduction disease NOT not understood , you could not be MORE mistaken, and again this reinforces the point I made earlier, you are not familiar with the subject matter



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:30 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


PAF is not treatable with vitamins and astronauts with life threatening arrhythmias should not be and as a matter of fact ARE NOT ASTRONAUTS on or off vitamins, ask your own doc about that one too
edit on 12-1-2013 by gingerlee because: spelling



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:34 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


also your presentation of slaytons problem is not consistent with the story as he and his buddies tell it, the trip to the mayo clinic for the Cath and so on, I suggest you familiarize yourself with that piece of fake Apollo lore before continuing



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:40 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


a fib is a far different animal now in the 21st century than it was in slaytons day, we have much much better treatments



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:40 AM
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reply to post by gingerlee
 


Really?


: arising spontaneously or from an obscure or unknown cause : primary
2
: peculiar to the individual

www.merriam-webster.com...


idiopathic /id·io·path·ic/ (id″e-o-path´ik) self-originated; occurring without known cause.


id·i·o·path·ic (d--pthk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to a disease having no known cause; agnogenic.
2. Of or relating to a disease that is not the result of any other disease.


idiopathic
[-path′ik]
Etymology: Gk, idios + pathos, disease
without a known cause.

medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com...

Now who doesn't know what they're talking about?





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