They Never Would Have Sent Deke Slayton Into Space, The Space Program Was A Hoodwink

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posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 11:20 PM
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Deke Slayton was diagnosed with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation(PAF). Because of this he could not not serve as an astronaut that flew. His illness forced him into a desk job where he became the "astronaut boss". He later was deemed "cured" and sent into space well after the conclusion of the Apollo Program. Atrial fibrillation is not curable and I along with others have concluded on this basis that the space Missions were faked. The logic; If Slayton really had PAF, he would never be cured of it. There was no treatment for it in those days. It does not go away like that. Because PAF is associated with a significant risk for stroke, they could not have sent him into space EVER as he would always and forever be at risk of endangering himself, his crew, the mission.




posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 11:23 PM
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reply to post by chrisbobson
 


So because 1 guy had a disease that is 'incurable' and made him 'unable to be an astronaut', the entire space program is a sham?

Now that's some spurious logic there.

No but really, do you believe this?

~Tenth



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 11:27 PM
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Just FYI, there was a thread on this a few months ago that may be worth reading if you wish to get some other people's thoughts on this matter...
www.abovetopsecret.com...


My own thoughts remain unchanged...
If I get this straight, your claim is that Deke never had the heart condition, but NASA told him he did (which was found out by the Mayo clinic tests) because of errmm.. some reason I dunno.
Or that he did, but vitamins cured it, which is being kept a big secret by NASA because of errmm.. some reason I dunno.
Or that vitamins didnt actually cure it at all, but NASA faked the Mayo clinic tests and lied to him because of errmm.. some reason I dunno.
So... what exactly is your point here???
edit on 8-1-2013 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 11:42 PM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


The point was the guy actually had the condition and could not be cured, therefore could have never been sent anywhere, due to the risks... This in conjunction with agreed upon reality that he was sent means that he was never in danger, not due to an illness he didn't have, but because he was only a face, according to the moon landings being faked.. He could be used because he wasn't ever at risk because he never had to leave the earth??

I don't agree with the OP at all, but I think you are purposefully confusing the issue.


@OP why would NASA chose to use someone in a "fake" mission who was already not passed for astronaut flight? Couldn't they use ANYONE else?? Seems it would bring unwanted attention if indeed the condition was real, and they indeed served. It would be easier to go ANY other path, than to make one wonder....



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 12:10 AM
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Originally posted by Dustytoad
The point was the guy actually had the condition ...



But "decisively" in the other thread was claiming he did NOT have the condition.


bogus astronaut diagnoses
Deke Slayton and his bogus atrial fibrillation
Slayton never had atrial fibrillation by the way



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 12:25 AM
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And at any rate, it comes and goes, and sometimes it just goes and never comes back. I've got it and did a lot of stuff that they'd have s---canned me for if they'd found out, I just lied about it, and if you don't catch it when it's happening, you can't tell by looking at EKG's.

All Deke would have needed was a long clear period and some handwashing behind the scenes, not too tough to get a series of clear EKGs, it's not disabling even when it's going on.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 12:29 AM
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Originally posted by alfa1

Originally posted by Dustytoad
The point was the guy actually had the condition ...



But "decisively" in the other thread was claiming he did NOT have the condition.


bogus astronaut diagnoses
Deke Slayton and his bogus atrial fibrillation
Slayton never had atrial fibrillation by the way




I don't agree with the OP I was only pointing out the view they have that you are dancing around.. Maybe one can see I was agreeing with you if one had the after sight.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 12:46 AM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


EXACTLY!



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 12:57 AM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


Here's a helpful analogy. Say you have been diagnosed with an idiopathic seizure disorder. This means you have seizures periodically just because you do. there is no other explanation. Actually, this is not all that uncommon a problem. Now, say you were an astronaut, one of the original Mercury 7 and this diagnosis was made. You of course would never be allowed to fly now would you. At any time, regardless of the effectiveness of medications of the era, there would be a not insignificant risk. Your doctors would not allow you to go. If they did, one would speculate quite appropriately the program was fake. this is because men with seizure disorders would not be allowed to pilot Apollo ships.

Having paroxysmal atrial fibrillation(PAF) would be quite similar in a sense to having a seizure disorder as an astronaut. With PAF, instead of suddenly developing abnormal electrical brain activity, you would suddenly develop abnormal electrical activity. Such activity is associated with drops in blood pressure and loss of consciousness even, breathing difficulty due to fluid build up in the lungs and in this case, unexpected strokes due to the development of heart blood clots in these patients. The clots migrate to the brain. Because PAF was not "curable " in those days, the risk of stroke always would exist for an astronaut like Slayton. Just as there is always a risk one might have a seizure in the setting of an idiopathic seizure disorder. So if Slayton really had PAF, he never would have been allowed to go into space.

One may conclude Slayton was "diagnosed" with PAF so he could be moved into the role of astronaut boss. When it was time for him to fly, he was undiagnosed or cured. The illness was a sham, has to be. And with it one concludes all of the manned space program.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 01:42 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


good GOD girl ain't you wicked smart. saw your other posts btw.

her point bedlam is this is not like duping your doc and dmv into letting you drive once diagnosed with a seizure disorder. in this case the docs cannot let you off the hook. the lives of others are at stake. if you have PAF the stroke risk doesn't go away. ask your own doc. so the nasa docs under no circumstance would allow slayton to fly. unless that is, it was fake.

for a new comer Chris you go straight to the head of the class.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 01:53 AM
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Originally posted by gingerlee
reply to post by Bedlam
 


good GOD girl ain't you wicked smart. saw your other posts btw.

her point bedlam is this is not like duping your doc and dmv into letting you drive once diagnosed with a seizure disorder. in this case the docs cannot let you off the hook. the lives of others are at stake. if you have PAF the stroke risk doesn't go away. ask your own doc. so the nasa docs under no circumstance would allow slayton to fly. unless that is, it was fake.

for a new comer Chris you go straight to the head of the class.


You've only got a stroke risk if it goes on for a long time. PAF, and what I've got, doesn't usually. Mine lasts about 2 minutes when it happens. I have sat down on march a few times. Not often. Never had it happen when something was going on, generally only when I'd sat down a long time and then stood up with a ruck on. I'd sit down and meditate for a minute or two, do a valsalva and convert. Right as rain.

If you're a command module pilot, it might be an issue. But really, not otherwise. And mine depends on a lot of things, but mostly too much tobacco and coffee were what was kicking it off. Cut those out and no recurrences. I sure wasn't going to get it on record, that would mean the end, tout fini, go to a b group and be an educator/manager role. Nope.

Deke, he was owed something, at least they thought that, and if he was not in a position to cause death and destruction, then it's the sort of thing they'd likely squeak by, especially if he hadn't had an issue with for some time.

To jump from that to the whole space program was fake (soooooo many reasons why that's wrong) is nuts.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 03:52 AM
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I have to humbly agree, the Logic trails off considerably.......
Military people have some pretty strange customs and social mores.
I could see Nasa Lying about this either way...
To slip him into the desk job honourably,
or pay him back for flying that desk efficiently for them.when needed....
Theres no need for generals to fly fighter or other aircraft ever, but........



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


you seem to not understand the pathophysiology, strokes occur regardless of the existent rhythm fib or normal sinus rhythm, PAF indicates the so diagnosed has a propensity to flip back and forth, the way you describe your problem suggests you believe yourself to only be at risk when in fib, if you had the same problem Slayton had you would be at significant and constant risk, this is why he must be proclaimed "cured" to fly, also reading between the lines it sounds as though you don't take pradaxa nor coumadin, if that is the case you are not being appropriately treated and or have something other than PAF, Chris has slayton by the short hairs here
edit on 9-1-2013 by gingerlee because: spelling correction



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 01:48 PM
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reply to post by stirling
 


you are missing her point, if slayton had a seizure disorder would he have been allowed to fly under any circumstance?



posted on Jan, 10 2013 @ 07:19 AM
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I guess you answered my question in the other thread you made. You don't ever get tired to talking to yourself.



posted on Jan, 10 2013 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by chrisbobson
 


Here is a bit of info I found very quickly, which should clear things up: "Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia lasting for more than 30 seconds. Its prevalence in the population increases with age, and it is estimated to affect over 4 percent of the population above the age of 60. "

Another point is that: "Atrial fibrillation usually followed the development of overt cardiovascular disease. Cardiac failure and rheumatic heart disease were the most powerful predictive precursors."

Meaning that even before the condition you mentioned came into effect there would have already been severe heart problems. That is why that condition usually comes into play in OLD age.

At the relatively young age of an astronaut it shouldn´t have therefore been a problem.

How old was he when he flew? I suppose that the risk at a rather young age is relatively low.

Plus not to mention the immensely huge mountain of evidence that exists besides this in favor of the moon mission.

Oh, where did you get the info that the guy had AF?
edit on 10-1-2013 by Nightaudit because: spelling
edit on 10-1-2013 by Nightaudit because: content added
edit on 10-1-2013 by Nightaudit because: spelling again



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 03:52 PM
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reply to post by Nightaudit
 


wish she would answer for herself, seems so capable, common knowledge slayton carried afib diagnosis and cleared to fly after the mayo clinic Cath and cajoling of independent doctors, check slaytons book DEKE and MOONSHOT, latter written by slayton and Shepard. Slayton always offered it was vitamins that cured his fib. among medical people that research the Apollo scam, this has become a staple argument, and with good reason, proves Apollo fake in a fairly straightforward and interesting way
edit on 11-1-2013 by gingerlee because: spellings



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


it's not uncommon for people with medical backgrounds to view Apollo as hood wink based on this important point, one would assume the OP to have a medical background, is that correct Chris?



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 07:09 PM
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Originally posted by gingerlee
reply to post by Bedlam
 


you seem to not understand the pathophysiology, strokes occur regardless of the existent rhythm fib or normal sinus rhythm, PAF indicates the so diagnosed has a propensity to flip back and forth, the way you describe your problem suggests you believe yourself to only be at risk when in fib, if you had the same problem Slayton had you would be at significant and constant risk, this is why he must be proclaimed "cured" to fly, also reading between the lines it sounds as though you don't take pradaxa nor coumadin, if that is the case you are not being appropriately treated and or have something other than PAF, Chris has slayton by the short hairs here
edit on 9-1-2013 by gingerlee because: spelling correction


The only reason you have to form clots is that during a-fib, your atria do not empty. You thus can get stagnant blood in the atrium that will eventually begin to clot. This does not happen when you are not in active fibrillation, and for people who only occasionally have fib or SVT, they do not put you on anti-coagulation.



posted on Jan, 11 2013 @ 08:52 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


I was drawing your attention to the fact your fib and slaytons were not necessarily the same, he wrote in MOON SHOT
that he was in fib twice a month, in those days they did not routinely anticoagulate fibrillators but they were acutely aware of the stroke risk and of course aware of the hemodynamic consequences as well, in slaytons day they had quinidine I believe and nothing else, despite his age he would have been viewed as an unacceptable risk to fly hence the crazy machinations to cure him , I would suggest you ask your own physician if he or she would allow a garden variety fibrilator someone in and out twice a month ,at least with such a history at one point, to fly a space ship, the answer of course is NO, I imagine the OP knows more about all this than me, would be nice to hear her weigh in, but the matter is straightforward and really delivers a crippling blow to the old story about men going into space
edit on 11-1-2013 by gingerlee because: spellings






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