question to people who use Liposomal Vitamin C

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posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 02:21 PM
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after reading the benefits of Liposomal vitamin C I have a question. Would the same procedure work with vitamin b 12? I'm a smoker= 1 pack a day and I drink but not that much lets say 1 or 2 drinks a month. As well as piracetam Nootropic drugs. I guess the question I'm asking is if this procedure helps to break down the vitamin better for absorption in the human body so its effectiveness is multiplied or does this only work with vitamin C?

could using this method have bad side effects?

B12
This vitamin is also called cobalamin. People who complain about feeling tired all the time are usually asked to take this vitamin. This vitamin certainly helps those suffering from chronic fatigue. It can boost one's energy levels. It helps in maintaining a healthy nervous system and aids in speeding up metabolism. It also regulates the growth of red blood cells.

RDA

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of cobalamin for infants below the age of 6 months is 0.4 mcg, while infants who fall in the age group of 6 to 12 months is 0.5 mcg.
For children in the age group of 1 to 10 years, the RDA ranges between 0.7 mcg to 2 mcg.
For children aged 11 and above and adults, the RDA is 2.4 mcg.
The RDA for pregnant women and nursing mothers is 2.6 mcg and 2.8 mcg respectively.

Side Effects
The absorption of this vitamin decreases with age which is why aged people might need to take this in form of supplements. Though a person is not likely to overdose on this vitamin as it is water-soluble, excess of anything is bad. If you have been experiencing a tingling sensation on the right side of your body, that might be one of the warning signs. Other side effects include insomnia, panic attacks, heart palpitations or hyperthyroidism.
Read more at Buzzle: www.buzzle.com...




posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by digital01anarchy
 


I am a C junkie, and maybe putting this question both here and on the existing threads will get some good answers.
edit on 8-1-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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reply to post by digital01anarchy
 


For every one cigarette you smoke; you are depleting 25mg of Vitamin C. Liposomal would be the best way to go if you are indeed a pack a day smoker.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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reply to post by digital01anarchy
 


Double post...
edit on 8-1-2013 by VeritasAequitas because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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reply to post by digital01anarchy
 


Dafuq...Triple post.
edit on 8-1-2013 by VeritasAequitas because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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Just do sublingual (under the tounge) of vit. C and vit B.

People make this whole vit. C thing way to complicated with lethicin and ultrasonic cleaners. Good lord people!

The basic premise is that the digestive system destroys the vitamins before they can be absorbed.

Well, in leiu of being able to do IM (intra-muscular) injections of these vitamins, a transdermal or sublingual administration would be:

1. Easier
2. Faster to bloodstream
3. Cheaper

DMSO has been used by bodybuilders for years as a transdermal carrier. It might cause skin irritation for sensitive people, and some people report it makes their breath smell like garlic (no biggie for me, Orbit anyone?)

You can also just get sublingual vitamin B/C tablets at Wallgreens/CVS. OR you could buy the powder in bulk, mix some tang with it and hold it under your tounge.

This whole liposomal thing just seems very gimicky to me. It's not like any of these people have invented a new form of vitamin C. The only thing they are accomplishing is creating a carrier method that helps protect the vitamins until absorbtion.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:16 PM
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You can also get enterically coated vitamins (they might set you back more). These have the advantage of not upsetting your stomach.

Personally, I take chewable pre-natal vitamins. They have more than the normal adult dose, so whatever gets destroyed in my gut is compensated for. And, because it's chewable it is easier to absorb. I suppose I could chew it up and hold it under my tounge too.

These are fairly cheap and can be found at most grocery/drugstores.

But hey, if everyone wants to get all Walter White in their kitchen with an ultrasonic cleaner and some soy lethicin -- have at it



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:19 PM
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There is a thread that is titled something like "I make my own liposomal vitamin c" you may find more information there. Would search and link you to it but I am on the mobile site and it doesn't have a search option. Good luck!


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


actually tried that but the newest thread about Liposomal Vitamin C didn't let me post a question, I know there is an older thread but people rarely respond to them now due to multiple post.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:24 PM
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I've heard of doctors giving B12 shots, I'm surprised that wasn't mentioned in the article. That way, the person is under a doctor's care, and monitored properly.
It also ensures a proper balance of the vitamins. Too much of one particular type of vitamin can cause an imbalance in the body.



For children aged 11 and above and adults, the RDA is 2.4 mcg. The RDA for pregnant women and nursing mothers is 2.6 mcg and 2.8 mcg respectively.



I take B50 stress tabs. The 50 stands for 50 mgs of various b vitamins. That's way, way, way stronger than anything measured in mcgs.
I've never had any sort of overdosing problems.
edit on 8-1-2013 by snowspirit because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by snowspirit
 


In the shady bodybuilding underworld some guys will make their own intra-muscular injections. I won't give details as to how it's done -- but if done improperly, it can lead to abcesses.

Definatley do anything involving injectable vitamins under the care of a doctor or trained medical technician!



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by digital01anarchy
 


Well i have gotten some interesting responses thank you everybody but i didnt actually get anything i could use. I asked if i could use the method with vitamin b12 and a Nootropic drug that is hard to get into the blood stream



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:52 PM
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Originally posted by MystikMushroom
Just do sublingual (under the tounge) of vit. C and vit B.


1. Easier
2. Faster to bloodstream
3. Cheaper


You can also just get sublingual vitamin B/C tablets at Wallgreens/CVS. OR you could buy the powder in bulk, mix some tang with it and hold it under your tounge.



Yeah, we'll start doing that, and once we get going we'll start making appointments to the dentist.
Ascorbic acid is bad for the enamel on your teeth.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by Toadmund
 


OR you could make your own transdermal delivery system....



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 06:06 PM
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Originally posted by digital01anarchy
reply to post by digital01anarchy
 


Well i have gotten some interesting responses thank you everybody but i didnt actually get anything i could use. I asked if i could use the method with vitamin b12 and a Nootropic drug that is hard to get into the blood stream


I know, I was interested in that too (although I'm not personally concerned with B12, don't we all get enough of that even as vegetarians, which everyone on this site is?). Maybe one-on-one the authors of the threads and the other people active on them, unless they all wander by here, which would be nice. For continuing any discussion concerning Vitamin C, you deserve only the very best!
edit on 8-1-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2013 @ 09:55 PM
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Using that process for the b12 might work since b's are water soluble, and may be worth a try to compare the effects vs sublingual ? B'12 is hard to get the way most people eat now (our ancient ancestors ate animal organs when they could get them so we evolved needing external sources, plant foods have minimal amounts).

Years ago I as a strict vegetarian and i came up high in homocysteine on a blood test at a naturopath - that is directly related to low b12 levels. I'm mostly vegetarian but once in a while not. Also the health of your gut will affect b12 absorption, so probiotics and prebiotics will help too.

This site has some good info on b12
blog.wellnesstips.ca...

(ps I hope you can quite smoking someday! not worth it. Lost several relatives inc. my mother to smoking related causes )



posted on Jan, 20 2013 @ 04:12 PM
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Originally posted by Toadmund

Originally posted by MystikMushroom
Just do sublingual (under the tounge) of vit. C and vit B.


1. Easier
2. Faster to bloodstream
3. Cheaper


You can also just get sublingual vitamin B/C tablets at Wallgreens/CVS. OR you could buy the powder in bulk, mix some tang with it and hold it under your tounge.



Yeah, we'll start doing that, and once we get going we'll start making appointments to the dentist.
Ascorbic acid is bad for the enamel on your teeth.


This is just what I was going to say, Ascorbic Acid would strip the back of your teeth in a matter of weeks, very bad for your enamel.
The point of liposomes is not just that they make it through the gut, they are also absorbed into the tissues as well as the blood stream. They are more bio-available than intravenous vitamin C (or transdermal for that matter).

Here's a presentation (albeit from a pharmaceutical perspective) that illustrates how effective liposomes are www.slideshare.net...

With regards to the OPs question, Liposomes work with water soluble vitamins (B12 is) and I'd be extremely cautious of ODing (Vitamin C and to a lesser extent Glutathione and it's constitutes are needed throughout the body all the time, so ODing is less of a concern).

Edit to add -
According to this (rather annoying) advert below - they already do liposomal B12 - so long as you get the dosages right, this would work! I already make liposomal vitamin C and this has sparked my interest so thanks OP!

The issue with cobalamin powder is it comes in Cyanocobalamin form, which is neither bio-available or something you'd want being delivered direct to your cells (research the cyano part). Pure cobalamin comes in crystal form and is highly sensitive to light (need to do more research on this).



edit on 20-1-2013 by boxertwin because: typos



posted on Feb, 1 2013 @ 08:42 PM
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Just as a heads-up, if you've had surgery or damage to your ileum, which is the part of the large intestine just after the small intestine, where it empties out, you'll not be able to absorb nearly as much B12 as needed.

I had a foot of this surgically excised for Crohn's disease and the idiot surgeon never told me this. About six years later I started getting very tired and had blood tests done; sure enough, it was exceedingly low. Without adequate B12, you'll get pernicious anemia (what they used to call it). I was on shots for a few months and take sublingually every day now.

Goes to show how lax most doctors are on things like that.



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 01:29 AM
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My first question about lipo C right now is whether I should be using ascorbic acid or sodium ascorbate. I've been using ascorbic acid, but I read something about it eventually wearing away the enamel on the teeth (and just read that here a few minutes ago too!), though I'd think the better encapsulated it is, the less likely this would be, and I also know that sodium ascorbate is what the commercial manufacturers use and what's given when someone does an IV C drip (pH balance is supposed to be easier on the veins). I've also read that in writing medical documents, a lot of researchers abbreviate with "AA," even when they're referring to sodium ascorbate, which could obviously lead to some confusion. Finally, I've seen that some people are adding baking soda to their lipo C recipes in order to buffer the ascorbic acid and change the pH balance but--in that case--why not just use sodium ascorbate to begin with? So far, I've been using ascorbic acid to make my lipo C and I have liked it, but I'm thinking of switching to the sodium ascorbate, unless there's a reason not to.

Second, what is the recommended brand/source of either ascorbate acid or sodium ascrobate? I was using a brand that I now realize does not say that the ascorbic acid is GMO-free (meaning that it likely comes from GMO-free corn or rice). In doing some research last night, I found a brand that is GMO-free and that does not come from China, but it's more expensive (but worth it, to me). I also saw that some people are using rose hips to make their lipo C or finding crystals that are derived from something other than corn (which hopefully means it has a higher chance of being "safe"), but I don't know what exactly it is they're using. Do you guys have a brand/source of C that you recommend?

Thanks!
Breezy



posted on Feb, 12 2014 @ 01:34 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


No, we absolutely do NOT all get enough B12, even if we're vegetarians (which I was for 10 years). I was testing off the charts high in B12, which made me suspicious. Upon doing some research, I learned that very high B12 serum levels can actually be indicative of B12 deficiency. I researched it and learned that a serum test is not enough. Instead you need a test that measures what's getting INSIDE the cells. Both NutrEval and Spectracell (sp) will test what's inside the cell. It turns out I'm low in B12. The reason my blood serum levels come back so high is that the B12 pools in my blood and does not get inside my cell. I also watched a documentary about several people who became very ill over time--one of them was a doctor who wound up in hospice. It ultimately turned out that all of these people were deficient in B12 and one of them was vegetarian. I don't remember the name of the documentary, but I think it's on YouTube if you're interested in trying to find it.



Breezy





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