Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy): increase in uplift and temperature as possible signs of magma ascent

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posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 05:42 PM
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It looks like we may not have to worry about the Yellowstone super volcano after all. This one might beat it to the punch. The headline at the Celestial Congergence web site claims that a super eruption could wipe out all life in Europe. Whether fear mongering or fact, having another super volcano acting up is not a good thing.

This one also has a more frequent and recent history of eruption.

SOURCE


According to a recent report by INGV Naples, the ground deformation of the Campi Flegrei (Phlegraean Fields) near Naples has increased considerably lately. During the last 12 months, the ground in some places near the town of Pozzuoli was uplifted by about 8 cm.



However, in addition to the detected ground deformation, scientists also measured increased numbers of micro earthquakes, a rise in temperature and in particular, an increase in the proportion of the gases of magmatic origin at fumaroles in the Solfatara crater.


Turn down the sound for the annoying music and read the text on the screen.

Here is the LINK to the biographical web page shown in the video near the end.

edit on 7-1-2013 by happykat39 because: added video
edit on 7-1-2013 by happykat39 because: (no reason given)
edit on 7-1-2013 by happykat39 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 06:29 PM
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Well, that makes at least THREE super Volcanos acting up .....
The idea that the earths core heating up is getting more reasonable by the day......
I put this to energy levels within the whole soar system changing......why?
NIBIRU.........................



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by happykat39
 


Interesting article, and while an eruption may not be imminent, you sure gotta wonder when all the signs are pointing that way. I guess they are waiting for intense tremors to start before sounding the alarm.

I dug up a real time webicorder for it here.

That uplift looks like it has accelerated in the last months:



But hey, it's just another supervolcano doing its thing, right?

If Yellowstone had the increased gas emissions, uplift and increased seismicity like Flegrei has, I'd definitely be freaking.
edit on Mon Jan 7th 2013 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 07:52 PM
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Wow.

I lived in Naples, Italy for 4 years in the early 1980's. Graduated high school there.

Rode a LOT of earthquakes there. Many small ones, but had a couple of 7's that rattled me around pretty good.

Bad thing is, the quakes themselves are pretty hard on all the Roman ruins there. I remember half of Pompeii being closed to the public after the quake in 1981.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 04:15 AM
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That's a tricky one I think.

How big are the signs going to be before this one's going off?
And how big is the eruption going to be once the signs are clearly there?

The day it'll happen, and it will happen, it won't wipe all life from Europe but it could have devastating repercussions, and not only for Europe, if it's going to be even a moderate eruption. (VEI 5-6)

Fingers crossed.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 05:34 AM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful
Wow.

I lived in Naples, Italy for 4 years in the early 1980's. Graduated high school there.


Really? Same here! Was it the 'Happy Horseshoe'? Or, before the horseshoe (aka Forrest Sherman?) Your dad work for NATO? Small world.

Did you ever go to the park in the old inactive crater? I worked at the snack bar for a while, while in High-school.



Rode a LOT of earthquakes there. Many small ones, but had a couple of 7's that rattled me around pretty good.

Bad thing is, the quakes themselves are pretty hard on all the Roman ruins there. I remember half of Pompeii being closed to the public after the quake in 1981.


I loved Pompeii! It was a regular hangout for us, back in the day.

on topic: I've lived in Italy and So. California (both known for earthquakes). Italy was always shaking, but nothing too large; just enough for things to fall off walls or onto the floor. California was always quiet, except for the big one in 1994 (Martin Luther King Day, If I remember correctly). I lived in Orange County, at the time. Now, that one was scary!

I came to the conclusion (self-concluded) that perhaps it's a good thing to have the constant rattling, as it lets off steam.
edit on 8-1-2013 by SourGrapes because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 05:45 AM
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The video pics make it look like just a nice gentle meadow to climb and have a picnic in. I would guess that many of the people living near it make that climb a lot, for the exercise and view.

If it blew wouldn't most of the tiny debris particulates travel east, not wiping out Europe as much as giving Greece and beyond the heebie jeebies? I would think people in western Europe would be a little safer than the easterners.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 05:49 AM
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Originally posted by SourGrapes

Originally posted by eriktheawful
Wow.

I lived in Naples, Italy for 4 years in the early 1980's. Graduated high school there.


Really? Same here! Was it the 'Happy Horseshoe'? Or, before the horseshoe (aka Forrest Sherman?) Your dad work for NATO? Small world.

Did you ever go to the park in the old inactive crater? I worked at the snack bar for a while, while in High-school.



Rode a LOT of earthquakes there. Many small ones, but had a couple of 7's that rattled me around pretty good.

Bad thing is, the quakes themselves are pretty hard on all the Roman ruins there. I remember half of Pompeii being closed to the public after the quake in 1981.


I loved Pompeii! It was a regular hangout for us, back in the day.

on topic: I've lived in Italy and So. California (both known for earthquakes). Italy was always shaking, but nothing too large; just enough for things to fall off walls or onto the floor. California was always quiet, except for the big one in 1994 (Martin Luther King Day, If I remember correctly). I lived in Orange County, at the time. Now, that one was scary!

I came to the conclusion (self-concluded) that perhaps it's a good thing to have the constant rattling, as it lets off steam.
edit on 8-1-2013 by SourGrapes because: (no reason given)


I went to both. They closed the one downtown after 82 and had everyone in the happy horse shoe, hehe.

The park was called Carney Park, and yes, been there many times for high school football games (I was in the band). That park really gave you the feeling of being in an ancient volcano because of the walls. Was great for the band though as the sounds would echo off of them.

And who can forget Solfatara? :holding nose: considering the happy horse shoe, NSA and the Naval hospital all sat right next to it.

Ahhhhhhh Italy. Loved the place.

Okay, sorry HappyKat! We didn't mean to hijack your thread.
edit on 8-1-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 05:58 AM
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reply to post by happykat39
 


Cheers for sharing this Happykat.


It must be noted that Campi Flegrei has a very long and detailed of inflation, stretching back beyond Pliny. 8cm of inflation is certainly nothing out of the ordinary there - past inflations that have led to eruptions have generally been in the region of upto several metres (just for a bit of perspective), so 8cm is certainly nothing to be getting your knickers in a twist about.

As a side note, back before Vesuvius blew up, The Phlegrean Fields (Campi Flegrei) was a location of one of the Sibyls, who used to hang about in one of the sulphur ridden caves in the area - not so surprising that they had "visions" really!

That said, with Vesuvius on one side and Campi Flegrei on the other, that is one area i would not be that keen on living in!

I am also a bit unsure about the claims for killing off life in Europe, to be honest (know it isn't your claim). Surely that would depend upon ash deposits, etc and that is determined by wind currents and the like. Northern Europe should therefore be fairly safe? Not often we get winds from Southern Europe......... It is certainly possible but i do not think it is that likely (if that makes sense),even if a super eruption did occur - after all, we have survived them before.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 06:01 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


I understand your concern but Flegrei is well known for this type of event, and to much larger levels of uplift. Interesting, worth keeping an eye on.......but not at the worry stage........yet.......



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 06:11 AM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Carney Park, that's it! I worked at the snack bar in '87 - '88. I had to check my FB highschool group page for any Eriks. We probably know some of the same people...at least some of the same teachers.

Sorry, OP....back to the thread...I wouldn't be shocked to see volcanic activity in that area, as it has been active for quite a while. Many inactive volcanoes and a few still showing some signs of life. Perhaps another Pompeii event? Like, another super volcanic eruption that explodes so rapidly to actually petrify humans and animals?

It really is scary to actually be able to see the fear in the faces of some of the victims. Amazing to be able to make out the facial features in some of the human remains; to actually see the terror of the day.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 06:22 AM
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reply to post by SourGrapes
 





Sorry, OP....back to the thread...


No worries mate. I don't get my knickers all bunched up over it like some folk do. In fact I enjoy a little reminiscing now and then. It lends a human touch to the subject.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 06:28 AM
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Here's a Google Earth pic of the area. You can clearly see the a lot of ancient calderas there that are very well defined:



I used this picture in another thread on here. Back in summer. There was a thread about scientist planning on drilling down here? I remember people speculating if it would trigger something.



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 06:28 AM
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reply to post by SourGrapes
 


Vesuvius was a fairly decent sized eruption - it certainly wasn't a super volcanic eruption. Although, i will concede, that is a moot point to the inhabitants of Pompeii and Herculaneum!

For perspective, Krakatoa and Pinatubo were both VEI 6 scale eruptions (less than 10 cubic miles of ejecta). A super volcano is at least a VEI 7 or even an 8. A 7 is for over 100 cubic miles of ejecta, for an 8 it would be over 1000 cubic miles. Vesuvius was about 1.5 cubic miles.

Eruptions also are not guaranteed to be of a super volcanic nature - that would require a build up of several factors and are not very common (well, they are but only in geological terms). The most likely eruptions at every super volcano are the run of the mill volcanic eruptions rather than any major super eruption.

These beasts are undoubtedly sleeping giants but they aren't worth over worrying about. The signs for a major eruption will be totally obvious and, even then, not worth worrying about as absolutely nothing can be done to prevent it. For example, a proper super volcanic eruption at somewhere like Yellowstone would involve pyroclastic flows obliterating (fairly quickly) everything within 100km of the blast. For an area of around 1500km around the blast, the landscape would be ash covered (severely) and there would be little light due to all the ash in the air (for example, estimates of at least half a metre of ash fall every hour).

In other words, you can't prep for it and if you are within that area you won't survive it so why worry about it?



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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once there was an article that they found campi's ash in neanderthaler caves in norway....
so if she goes it could be bad for Europe an scandanavia...

edit on 8-1-2013 by ressiv because: (no reason given)





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