Heaven On Earth if You Ask Me...

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posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 02:48 PM
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here are the sleeping gardens, went out and did a row of beets yesterday, down on the lower garden, lettuce and radishes will go next month come snow or shine. The garden closet has only been tilled under and not ready for planting yet. These gardens were beautiful over the summer.

edit on 12-1-2013 by antar because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 03:23 PM
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Looks great thanks! You have more space then me you could do some cool Sepp Holzer style raised beds there How many acres do you have?



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 03:04 PM
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I found this more in depth video of Sepp Holzer and how his farm works. This place is just absolutely beautiful. They are farming at 4000+ feet imagine what we could do in milder climates. He has a new book out too about beautifying the desert.

If you scroll down a little bit you can watch the video on the site. I could not find it on yourtube there but I was able to download it from their site I am going to burn it to DVD so I can watch in on TV.

www.permaculture-media-download.com...

This man is truly inspired of you ask me. This is most definitely the future but we need to get rid of these goodamend factory farming and corporate globalist that are destroying the soil and the planet with GMO mono-culture pesticides and chemical fertilizers. Sepp uses none of that he doesn't even have to irrigate. We could truly build the earth into the Garden of Eden with these methods!

I ordered his original book and I want to teach this stuff.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by hawkiye
 


Thanks for this thread and the videos. There are a bunch of people on the Librarything website who contribute to their "Sustainability" group discussion. Many, many books and other resources are listed there. Check it out. I would have posted a lot of my contributions there onto ATS as well, but it would be tough to organize it well here, from what I have seen on ATS so far. Here is that link:

www.librarything.com...

Note: The sustainability thread on Librarything is far from perfectly organized, but at least all the threads are on one page, and the book/media reviews are thoughtful.



posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 08:00 PM
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Originally posted by Uphill
reply to post by hawkiye
 


Thanks for this thread and the videos. There are a bunch of people on the Librarything website who contribute to their "Sustainability" group discussion. Many, many books and other resources are listed there. Check it out. I would have posted a lot of my contributions there onto ATS as well, but it would be tough to organize it well here, from what I have seen on ATS so far. Here is that link:

www.librarything.com...

Note: The sustainability thread on Librarything is far from perfectly organized, but at least all the threads are on one page, and the book/media reviews are thoughtful.



Thanks I will check it out... Sepp has inspired me I think this is my calling, I am not in a position very conducive to pursuing it much right now but I feel compelled to do so anyway and the way will open up

edit on 22-1-2013 by hawkiye because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 02:34 AM
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Here is the latest video I posted on yout tube so its easier to watch:



www.youtube.com...



posted on Jun, 8 2013 @ 06:12 PM
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*bump*

I just found this farmer on youtube and was blown away. I wanted to immediately make a post about him but of course did a search.

The updated video posted a bit later in the thread is the one I was going to post.

What an absolute genius this farmer is. And for those people preparing to live off the land when all heck breaks out?.. you have to at least glean a few bits of his wisdom.

I think this man's philosophy could really shed light on a broken agriculture system while preparing us to think for ourselves (which I gather we like around here).

There is a segment about using rocks as heat beds for plants while the roots of those plants keep the rocks from tumbling off the hillside. It is absolutely brilliant and probably stuff our ancestors would have taught us if not for gov interference.

So grab a cup of coffee or a glass of wine and give the video a look. The man is inspirational.

I keep thinking of the hillsides along the highway in Oregon that have boulders falling on cars during the rainy season. I wonder of they could plant something there that could benefit the region while yielding a crop that could be sold at farmers' markets.


(See the post above mine for the video.)




edit on 8-6-2013 by PrincessTofu because: (no reason given)
edit on 8-6-2013 by PrincessTofu because: (no reason given)
edit on 8-6-2013 by PrincessTofu because: (no reason given)





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