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Double-Star Systems Can be Dangerous for Exoplanets

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posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 08:03 AM
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Just thought this article was interesting as many have speculated that our Sun may have a well-hidden, extemely dim, binary companion - many of the objects in our Galaxy and the Universe cannot be viewed with the naked eye.


Exoplanets circling a star with a far-flung stellar companion — worlds that are part of "wide binary" systems — are susceptible to violent and dramatic orbital disruptions, including outright ejection, the study found.



Two-star systems occur commonly throughout our galaxy; indeed, astronomers think the Milky Way harbors about as many binary systems as single stars. Recently, astronomers have begun discovering planets in binary systems, some of them "Tatooine" worlds with two suns in their skies, like Luke Skywalker's home planent in the "Star Wars" films.



If a wide binary lasts long enough, it eventually will find itself with a very high orbital eccentricity at some point in its life.”


Link to article

Many ancient Earth calendars use a 360 day cycle, which is not a lunar one which would be 355 days.


Often, exoplanets just get tugged from their orginal, near-circular orbits into more eccentric ones, the simulations showed.


This is just speculation so there is no need to get nasty. I welcome intelligent discourse but if such things truly upset you, ATS is probably not a good fit.

Peace.




posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 08:14 AM
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Is this a Planet X, thread ?



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 08:19 AM
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reply to post by rom12345
 



I thought the word 'star' would be obvious that it isn't a planet x thread...


EDIT: Just saw his user, i understand your statement

edit on 7/1/2013 by DeyTookErJeobs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by PlanetXisHERE
 


the problem I have with the mainstream theories is that a lot of it is based on assumption. when it comes to geological timeframes, all we have is gueswork, no real direct observation beyond a few generations

yes they have models that predict things, but when they tell me that 2 + 2 = 4 based off these models, it makes we wonder if that is just one possible scenario.

just because the models and theories seem to be correct, it does not mean they are. after all 5 - 1 = 4 also...



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 09:09 AM
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So they did models for our system and half of the time, one of the bigger planets, Jupiter, Saturn or Uranus got booted out of the system.

Also they determined that eccentric orbits, excited orbits in a system were indicative of a widely spaced binary.

So, does our system have any weird orbits? After all, that is cutting to the chase of the matter!
edit on 7-1-2013 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 09:19 AM
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It appears we're not in a binary system, as has been often speculated. If it was a tight binary, where planets are in less eccentric and safer orbits, we'd certainly know, 2 suns in the sky. However, we don't have eccentric type orbits. Mercury is the most eccentric and its closest. Pluto which is eccentric, got tossed aside as a planet, though will always think of it that way, but its small, in comparison to the larger planets, anyway, whereas most of the other systems involved larger ones. So it appears we're in the clear that way.

www.space.com...
edit on 7-1-2013 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 01:26 PM
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Originally posted by rom12345
Is this a Planet X, thread ?


Not at all, but why would that matter? Are you not free to choose which threads you read and respond to?

Anyway, I just put this out there because I thought it was interesting and possibly relevant to those of us inhabiting this third rock from the Sun.

Also, I was just curious to see if any poster would deny with 100% certainty that this was a possibility in our solar system.



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by PlanetXisHERE
 

Excellent thread. Really floors me, though, how astrophysicists continue to talk about our own solar system situation in the 3rd person. As though this common occurrence was happening to someone else.

All we have to do is take a look around our solar system to view the effects of past destruction. Planets tilted and askew. Heck, the entire solar system tilted at an alarmingly sharp angle. This is evidence of the past. Currently weather, warming, orbital anomalies, unexplained comets starting with Hale-Bopp herald an approach.






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