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Hypoallergenic Cats in 2007

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posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 06:04 PM
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A Company called Allerca is taking reservations now for genetically altered hypoallergenic cats that they expect to have available in 2007.


The mission of ALLERCA is to produce transgenic lifestyle pets


They describe their method as "gene silencing" to reduce the production of the protein in a cats saliva that causes the allergen.

It caught my eye since I became allergic to my own felines (after 10 years) and it was quite a problem. Yet, there is just something about this that bothers me (above and beyond the wild price tag of 3,500 bucks that personally I wouldn't pay for a pet).

I seriously wonder what the repercussion to the kitties will be? If all cats have this protein in their saliva, it seems to me there is some natural reason and possible need for it?

Assuming they even succeed in this process I suspect other "transgenic lifestyle pets" will follow.

I wonder how most pet people feel about messing with our companions at the genetic level and how many allergic people are out there who would pay anything to be able to have one?




posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 06:10 PM
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Wow. That a heavy topic, actually.

What's next, you wife tends to snore at night... Wakes you up. Should you consider injecting her with an agent that changes the way she breathes?

Scary stuff.



posted on Oct, 27 2004 @ 10:44 AM
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bullshi....

$3500 for a cat !!! I don't think so tim...


My G/F used to be allergic to cats... yes used to be... she wanted a cat so bad when we were first together, but thought she couldn't have one... so we got one anyway to try it..

for the first couple of days, sneezing, watery eyes, a little rash... but then nothing.... she adapted to the cats, I guess... her body could then tolerate them..

I still can't get over the $3500....



posted on Oct, 27 2004 @ 11:14 AM
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There are already 'aid dogs' that are hypoallergenic.

Today both are successfully exporting Labradoodles all over the world to asthma and allergy sufferers. The Labradoodle Association of Australia Inc. has been formed to provide guidelines on breeding for the support to Labradoodle owners and fanciers worldwide.

www.labradoodle-dogs.com...

Sanc'.



posted on Oct, 27 2004 @ 11:46 AM
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I am allergic to my two cats--and so is my boyfriend. I get shots & we keep the cats out of the bedroom, but sometimes the dander in our apartment really gets to us. However, as much as the thought of a dander-free cat is tempting, I too would feel funny with a genetically modified pet.

I wonder if there are any unknown impacts on these modified cats. I've read about the genetically modified dogs and every-so-often, one is born with a defect that shortens its lifespan. I realize that the company can offer a "lifetime guarantee", but these are pets, not pots and pans or a mattress. My cats are family members--to say that we are attached to them is an understatement.

BTW, Allerca is owned by Geneticas Life Sciences. They also own ForeverPet, which is developing retail pet cloning technology (www.geneticas.com...) so you can save your pet's cells now and clone them when they pass away. Not sure how I feel about that either--although I did go out and adopt another tabby cat when my older tabby passed away. But there were plenty of tabbies at the ASPCA that needed homes--and that didn't require me to spend a lot of money. I feel like this company is trying to capitalize off of pet owners' grief, so I have serious reservations about their good intentions...





[edit on 27-10-2004 by lmgnyc]



posted on Oct, 27 2004 @ 07:29 PM
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Originally posted by lmgnyc

BTW, Allerca is owned by Geneticas Life Sciences. They also own ForeverPet, which is developing retail pet cloning technology (www.geneticas.com...) so you can save your pet's cells now and clone them when they pass away. Not sure how I feel about that either--.

I feel like this company is trying to capitalize off of pet owners' grief, so I have serious reservations about their good intentions...

[edit on 27-10-2004 by lmgnyc]


Wow, thanks for the additional info, I didn't see that when I was looking at them.

I agree, this is going too far, as much as there is a pet in my past I feel I will never replace, I would never have wanted a clone of him either, and I do feel this company's intentions are questionable.

Also, as Aelita pointed out, at what point does this spread to humans?

"Gene silencing", if successful with cats - can you imagine what this could lead to? This seems to me the first step to genetic engineering that will ultimately become an issue with the human species. Aren't we pretty close to mapping out all the genes at this point. Now nail down the objectionable ones, and make them mute. Imagine the health issues (obviously those with hereditary consequences) that could be "weeded out" of the next generation.

Still, it's just too "playing god" for me. As I alluded to in the beginning of this, how do you remove a gene that nature has always had, and not expect unforeseen consequences?




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