Solar Activity Watch 2013

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posted on Sep, 12 2013 @ 08:33 PM
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reply to post by The Undertaker
 


That is concerning to me. what are those black spots I have seen on the sun recently? What do we know about them at this solar maximum with little activity? Also, seems like this solar maximum got off to a slow start, maybe winding down the same way?




posted on Sep, 12 2013 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by antar
 


One theory is that they are areas of increased magnetism, but I don't know. So out of my league here it's ridiculous.



posted on Sep, 13 2013 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by The Undertaker
 


sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov...

EIT 284 shows the most dramatic area of black. It seems that this would be a cooler area of the sun if bright equals hotter and higher. Other images show that it might be growing, and if so, that aint good. I'm not ready for our star to become a brown dwarf yet.



posted on Sep, 13 2013 @ 01:13 AM
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thats a lot off "black as sackcloth"



posted on Sep, 13 2013 @ 01:28 AM
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reply to post by The Undertaker
 




Other images show that it might be growing, and if so, that aint good. I'm not ready for our star to become a brown dwarf yet.

It won't. It's too massive.
The fate of the Sun is to become a red giant...in several billion years.

A coronal hole is a "hole" in the corona of the Sun. It doesn't have much to do with the nuclear furnace at the Sun's core.
edit on 9/13/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2013 @ 01:31 AM
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Phage
reply to post by The Undertaker
 




Other images show that it might be growing, and if so, that aint good. I'm not ready for our star to become a brown dwarf yet.

It won't. It's too massive.
The fate of the Sun is to become a red giant...in several billion years.


ahhh Fate,, so Fickle ,she Is.

Sometimes just a tickle,
sometimes, a sneeze,
Fate, she'll do as she may,,
is told.



posted on Sep, 13 2013 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Some theories on coronal holes are that they are (scars) from sunspots. Other theories are that they are areas of increased magnetism. Due to the upcoming polarity flip, gradual or not, I would tend to lean towards the increased magnetism idea. Do you have an opinion on either theory?



posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 06:05 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Phage and everyone, the NASA SDO page has not been updated since October 1, 2013 due to the US Federal government shut-down: sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov...

News reports claim that many NASA staff members have been furloughed because of the government shutdown. My question is, will those employee furloughs leave NASA blindsided if severe solar max events start to unfold this month?
edit on 10/2/2013 by Uphill because: Added text.



posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by Uphill
 


No. Space weather monitoring and forecasting is considered essential.

www.swpc.noaa.gov...
stereo.gsfc.nasa.gov...
sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov...



posted on Nov, 8 2013 @ 08:23 AM
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Heads up!




Right now, today, one of the largest sunspot groups of Cycle 24 – AR1890 – is pointing nearly strait at Earth.


The sun has been fairly quiet this cycle, but this particular group has already produced one large X-class flare. And today, it's pointed our way. No telling what it might do, but for a the next few days at least, let's all hope it stays quiet.



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 11:50 PM
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As predicted, sunspot AR1890 has unleashed another strong flare, an X1-class explosion on Nov. 10th at 05:14 UT. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded a bright flash of extreme ultraviolet radiation from the blast site:





The flare also produced a strong burst of ~300 MHz radio waves, recorded at the Mauritius Radio Telescope on the island of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean: data.

This is the third X-flare from AR1890 since Nov. 5th, and all three have something in common: brevity. AR1890 tends to produce impulsive flares, peaking sharply in a matter of minutes or less. Often, brief flares do not produce coronal mass ejections (CMEs), but this one is an exception. A movie of the flare shows a plume of material lifting off the sun shortly after the UV flash. Update: A faint CME associated with that plume could deliver a glancing blow to Earth's magnetic field on Nov. 12th or 13th. Stay tuned for further analysis


SpaceWeather



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 11:52 PM
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I don't believe the sun is what we have been led to believe it is.



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 10:15 AM
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Massive sunspot visible in magnetogram. It appears in middle. Black spots represent southward polarity, or inward polarity. White spots northward, or outward polarity.




All images are from
sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov...
edit on 18-11-2013 by Thebel because: (no reason given)





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