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Is it time for the British crown to man up to its signed agreements in the Idle No More issues?

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posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck
Certainly, they ought to get a piece of the action from natural resources on their traditional lands. Jobs, education, health care, and above all, good internal leadership, are what's needed. No easy answers.


Yea, because more government intervention will make the situation better.

The solution is simple, harsh, but simple.

End the Indian Act and move one.

Cultures and communities will survive if they are capable, and fail if they are not. No amount of money will change that. No amount of education will change that. No access to health care will change that.

If anything, the changes that you are suggesting will hasten the closure of most reserves substantially. Although, that, in and of itself, could be a good thing.




posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 04:01 PM
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Originally posted by peck420
Yea, because more government intervention will make the situation better.
No, not more, but better focused

The solution is simple, harsh, but simple.
End the Indian Act and move one.
That 's pretty easy to say when you are on the winning side of the equation, and it solves nothing.


Cultures and communities will survive if they are capable, and fail if they are not. No amount of money will change that. No amount of education will change that. No access to health care will change that.
In in a country the size and range of ours, you are writing off a vast swath outside of the temperate zone. If we want to lay claim to the far north, for instance, we have to subsidize life there. Being Canadian is not determined by a favourable business case. Conversely, if funds are used to hasten change from within, it is better invested.


If anything, the changes that you are suggesting will hasten the closure of most reserves substantially. Although, that, in and of itself, could be a good thing.
First Nations have lands set aside for their exclusive use. The poor jest is that it was land nobody else particularly wanted. Now they're getting the shake-down for the resources, too? What you are suggesting is to just walk away from the problem, and that's what's been going on for years. How about some constructive ideas?



posted on Jan, 12 2013 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck
That 's pretty easy to say when you are on the winning side of the equation, and it solves nothing.

Define winning.

The bulk of my benefits over FN come not from federal resources. They come from civic resources. Resources that any area in Canada is allowed to collect from their residents.

So, what is stopping any FN Nations from doing the same? Oh, wait, some have done it and they are doing considerably better than those that don't.


In in a country the size and range of ours, you are writing off a vast swath outside of the temperate zone. If we want to lay claim to the far north, for instance, we have to subsidize life there. Being Canadian is not determined by a favourable business case. Conversely, if funds are used to hasten change from within, it is better invested.


Funny, it would appear that empirical data disagrees with you. For all of the money that the Canadian government has invested anywhere in Canada, favourable circumstances have only occurred when it has become a favourable business case.

Northwest Territories has had billions invested by the federal government for decades. Barely any change. Diamonds are found and business' move in, all of a sudden drastic change and growth.

Yukon. Same thing. (Gold/oil)

Alberta. Same thing. (Oil)

Saskatchewan. Same thing. (Potash/uranium/oil)

The biggest periods of growth occur during these periods because business' do what the governments (local or other wise) won't, don't, or can't. Focus.

In fact, the only two areas of Canada that haven't gone through this cycle would be the two areas of Canada that have had major business established since before Canada was a country.


First Nations have lands set aside for their exclusive use. The poor jest is that it was land nobody else particularly wanted. Now they're getting the shake-down for the resources, too? What you are suggesting is to just walk away from the problem, and that's what's been going on for years. How about some constructive ideas?


I gave a very constructive idea, instead of fighting human nature, follow it. Instead of fighting cultural nature, embrace it.

Everybody wants facts, but nobody wants to accept them because they don't fit our current ideals and morals. Facts don't care about our ideals and morals, they never have. And, the simple fact is, some cultures survive, some don't. Throwing money at them, or artificially sustaining them only delays the inevitable, it won't change it.
edit on 12-1-2013 by peck420 because: (no reason given)





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