7.7 Quake Just Hit SE Alaska High on the Cascadia Subduction Zone

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posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:25 AM
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Check out RSOE!

SCARY!



peace




posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:28 AM
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reply to post by Nyiah
 

I saw your "never mind", but to answer your specific question about that heliplot in FL, the P wave arrived there at about 9.06 (UTC), which is right on for the estimated P-wave travel time for the event off Craig, AK. As for all the rest that makes the plot do hard to read, it's interference. On the page you linked to, just click on the tag "station issues" and you'll see it says:


Current Issues
Power system may be causing some station noise.

(From the USGS station issues page for the above Helicorder.)

In other words, they're getting intereference from the power supply, which is not such an uncommon problem for helis in more isolated places.

This quake sure shook things up for a long time. Take a look at helicorder station YML in Yellowstone

We can see the first waves from the quake arrived there at about 9:02:45 (UTC -- 02:02:45 MST -- local), and after the first, smaller jolt that built to a peak after 30 seconds and then died down again, things rumbled a bit for around 4 1/2 minutes and then the main shock hit at around 09:08:15 (UTC). There was about 2 1/2 minutes of very intense shaking (the scale is clipped off and it doesn't show the peaks), then at around 9:11:30 it begins to died down, but it keeps rumbling as it dies away over the next three-quarters of an hour or so.

Just a note for anyone: the colors of the traces mean nothing. They are just to make it easier to discern the lines when things get messy.
Read from left to right to follow the time. The time scale on the left is local to Yellowstone, the one shown on the right is UTC. The fine, vertical lines are to divide things up into one-minute intervals.



edit on 5/1/13 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:28 AM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican

Originally posted by LightningStrikesHere
so is CA coast safe ?


That depends on who you talk to, when speaking for the near future.


Anyway, the minute this quake happened, I checked for potential triggering at our big volcanic beasts, YS and LV. No action, so it appears that all is well for now.


But I do know this much: if Cascadia goes and all hell breaks loose on the west coast, NO ONE will be able to say they didn't know it was coming. Cascadia has been warning us for years with big quakes up and down its length, and combined with all the other evidence, the time is ripe.

Yeah the west coast is safe...haha
edit on Sat Jan 5th 2013 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)
so where would you sugest a safe place be ? if this Cascadia happens



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:33 AM
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reply to post by silo13
 

And that's why we do not use RSOE as a reliable source for quake info, though it's good for some other events.
There was only one main quake -- not three -- but while RSOE takes its source feeds from various sources it doesn't actually collate them very well. So we often see misleading or simply wrong quake info from them.

Far better to use sources that specialize in quakes, rather than one that is based on what was originally a HAM radio network of users and which is a virtual catch-all for events of many kinds.

The traces from Yellowstone (in my post) show very clearly that there was only one main, large event. If there had been three at the intervals shown by RSOE, they'd be on the YS traces. They're not, because they didn't happen.


edit on 5/1/13 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:34 AM
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Originally posted by LightningStrikesHere
so where would you sugest a safe place be ? if this Cascadia happens



Oh let's see...an airplane, helicopter, maybe at westcoast's house (cause I am sure her familly understands the concept of duck and cover by now
), or put more simply, anywhere that is not THERE.


+13 more 
posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:37 AM
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We live on Baranoff Island just north of Craig where the quake hit, We felt it good here, got evacuated to higher ground, the alarm system here was great, gave everyone good warning and the whole city of about 8k mobilized in an instant. No one was hurt, the Coast Guard was on it and everyone was helping everyone. It was a good - I hate to call it a drill- but a good demonstration of our readiness to protect ourselves. They just cancelled the alarm here in Sitka as of 2:30am Alaska time. So far it sounds like no one was hurt. If anything changes I'll be sure to post again. Peace brothers and sisters!



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:37 AM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican

Originally posted by LightningStrikesHere
so where would you sugest a safe place be ? if this Cascadia happens



Oh let's see...an airplane, helicopter, maybe at westcoast's house (cause I am sure her familly understands the concept of duck and cover by now
), or put more simply, anywhere that is not THERE.


lol well now that you put it that way , ill just stick my head in the mud and hope for the best ! ............



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:38 AM
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reply to post by LightningStrikesHere
 

If you're anywhere along the PNW coast, a safe place would be at least 100 feet above sea level. Because when the last megathrust hit the Cascadia subduction zone off BC/WA/OR on Jan 26, 1700, in some places the tsunami came ashore 30 metres high (about 100 feet).

Most experts advise that the best defense against a tsunami -- meaning the best way to survive -- is to get to high ground. As we saw from Japan, even 30-foot-high reinforced concrete sea walls won't stop a big tsunami. It just goes over the top and/or flattens it. So, people will need to do what the Japanese survivors often did: head for the hills. Literally.
edit on 5/1/13 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:47 AM
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reply to post by Rockbeard
 

That's excellent news and we're very glad to hear from you! Truly!
First-person accounts by ATS members are always worth having and we appreciate it very much!

Quake preparedness is a major factor in saving lives and reducing panic. Good to see that your local authorities took things very seriously and did exactly what they needed to do.

I imagine this mag 7.5 was quite a shaker to endure, but the megathrust 9.0 (estimated) in 1700 was over 30 times more violent in terms of shaking and released somewhere around 180 times more energy. As you all needed to get to higher ground, do the authorities have plans for how you'll achieve that if you get a quake that much more powerful, with the period of strong shaking that lasts for maybe 5 to eight minutes before people can even stand on their feet?

I'm just being a realist here. Frankly I hope you all never see such a thing, but as it's possible and has happened before several times, it's likely that there'll be a lot of damage to infrastructure such as roads and bridges, so using vehicles would probably be a no-go in most cases. Are you all able to reach higher ground on foot, within a few minutes of the main shaking dying down?
edit on 5/1/13 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:56 AM
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Originally posted by Frankenchrist
And it will effect ........

Nobody.


Nothing could be further from the truth. In this very thread we have a report of someone there in Craig, AK, who says the whole town was evacuated to higher ground. I'd like to see you say you weren't "affected" the next time you have to pick up and leave your house in a panic for higher ground.
That's pretty insensitive really.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 06:06 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 

OH! Good to know!
Thank you so much for the info.
I'll hunt up another site (or just keep looking through this thread).
Sweet info -
peace



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 06:12 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


Well where we live like I mentioned its only about 8k people. We live on a giant rock basically that juts straight up out the ocean. We are sitting basically on a mountainside with roads going pretty straight up off the coast areas. I personally live right near the beach but there is a road thats right next to my house that goes up several hundred feet. As soon as we heard the alarm, in went our bug out bags, pets, extra monies, food and personal protection. The whole city was moving quickly, of course many were running and wasting no time, but even for such a small town comparatively we are very modern here and lots of cars too, so it was quite the scene seeing thousands of people scrambling to high ground, but everyone seemed to have a place to go and as soon as everyone was parked up on the hills almost every house I saw had its doors open and people were letting neighbors of all kinds come in for food, shelter, bathrooms and comfort. Our mountains are pretty high here so hopefully of course we never see such a massive hit here, but we are safer than some others in that we can climb so high quickly. Nice thing too this is a fishing hub and great hunting so even if the SHTF I know we'll be ok for food and shelter. But thats us, not everyone will have that luxury. Alaskans are a tough bunch though, other than kids being scared the most, the largest percentage of us were ready to get to it. It was a crazy night, im so tired though now, so if I seem like im rambling my apologies. Im happy to say though I get at least another night on my pillowtop bed, I dont always count it will be there but tonight it is. Peace guys.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 06:19 AM
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reply to post by Rockbeard
 


Thanks for update

Seems like you guys have it pretty sussed. We get 1/2 inch of snow in England and the whole country grinds to a halt. God knows what would happen if we had to deal with something major. Present floods notwithstanding.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 06:19 AM
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Originally posted by cody599
All the ATS'ers in the region hang on to your tin foil hats !
Good luck and our thoughts are with you.
If you're not to busy you could give us first hand accounts, just remember women, kids ........then ATS



Hehehehehehhee....Hahahahahahahhaha.


That's funny!!



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 06:21 AM
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back in 1964 there was a 9.2 quake that hit Anchorage

earthquake.usgs.gov...



he Alaskan earthquake that is outstanding in the memory of most occurred in the Anchorage area on March 27, 1964 (March 28, 1964 UTC). The magnitude 8.5 [recalculated to 9.2] shock devastated downtown Anchorage and left homes twisted and broken in the residential section of Turnagain. A tsunami virtually destroyed many of Alaska's coastal towns and spread death and destruction along the west coast of the United States, Hawaii, and Canada.



earthquake.usgs.gov...


This great earthquake and ensuing tsunami took 128 lives (tsunami 113, earthquake 15), and caused about $311 million in property loss. Earthquake effects were heavy in many towns, including Anchorage, Chitina, Glennallen, Homer, Hope, Kasilof, Kenai, Kodiak, Moose Pass, Portage, Seldovia, Seward, Sterling, Valdez, Wasilla, and Whittier.


glad i remembered this quake ....

earthquake.usgs.gov...
edit on 5/1/13 by alysha.angel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 06:40 AM
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Now another 5.4 aftershock, and it is SOUTH.



earthquake.usgs.gov...

Interesting that all these quakes are sticking very close to the zone line, and I don't know if that's necessarily a good thing. Could be an indicator that bigger things are yet to come closer to shore, where the more stressful parts of the locked zone are.

EDIT: They moved that quake further north and more towards shore- see that same link now and look at pic-

earthquake.usgs.gov...
edit on Sat Jan 5th 2013 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 07:51 AM
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Just been a new jolt there at about 13:46:30 UTC... I'm watching GEE and it looks like a mid-range mag 5 or thereabouts.

Not posted on USGS yet so we'll see what they say.

EDIT! I'm wrong on this. No way it's a mag 5. (More likely a high 2 to low 3, maybe!) I misread my comparitive event.
Please see TA's post on the next page here where he points out that my estimate could not be right.

My apologies for the misread, and my thanks to TA for pointing it out.

edit on 5/1/13 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 07:58 AM
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Here's a screenshot from gee for the above. Look at the third trace (the Wrangell Island one):

Range +16 to about -12 Microns/sec... I'd guesstimate around a mag 5.3 to 5.5 or so.

Still not up on USGS yet so we can only see what they finally report.

EDIT! See my post above. I misread the data for the comparitive even and so this is NOT a mag 5-range event and is in fact much smaller.
edit on 5/1/13 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 08:07 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


Here is the same EQ on station AT.CRAG.BHZ, in GEE, which is a bit closer to the action.



Check out the Iris link for the same station. I can barely see this event at 13:45UTC because the main shock was so much larger, the scaling makes the smaller events microscopic.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 08:17 AM
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reply to post by Olivine
 

Thanks for that.... Like an idiot, I forgot to factor in the P-wave travel time delay with my own seismo trace.
So the event time is closer to 13:45:45 to 13:46 (ish), depending how they want to read it.

I get what you're saying with that Iris link. But even if this new event comes in around mag 5.5, then the main shock was around 100 times more powerful with its shaking (and 1000x more energy released), so it's no surprise that smaller events get a bit swamped!

The one above is still not showing up on USGS (or, naturally, ESMC and the others). I guess they have seismologists on this and they're adding them manually after review.





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