7.7 Quake Just Hit SE Alaska High on the Cascadia Subduction Zone

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posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 03:51 AM
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And it will effect ........

Nobody.




posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 03:51 AM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican
reply to post by alysha.angel
 


I just dug it up from one of the closest stations, US.WRAK:

www.iris.edu...

wowza, big one! [/quote


im trying to find a downloadable one and this site isnt helping lol

www.aeic.alaska.edu...


from the wall street journal ( what i was able to find... god i suck)
online.wsj.com...





A 7.7 magnitude earthquake struck southeastern Alaska, the U.S. Geological Survey reported Saturday. The quake was about 208 miles south of Juneau, Alaska, and 641 miles northwest of Vancouver, British Columbia
edit on 5/1/13 by alysha.angel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 03:56 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


Second update on WCATWC downgraded to 7.6 but warning and advisory remains the same



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 03:57 AM
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I'm here in Hawaii (visiting family) and no tsunami warnings....yet.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 03:59 AM
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January 5, 2013 --

Updated 0953 GMT (1753 HKT)


There were no initial reports of damage but the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center warned that a "tsunami with significant widespread inundation of is land is expected."


edition.cnn.com...

wcatwc.arh.noaa.gov...

ptwc.weather.gov...

tsunami.jrc.it...



edit on 5-1-2013 by MariaLida because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:00 AM
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Ok, I suppose some good news is that 2 aftershocks have already hit, a 4.5 and 4.7- meaning this is likely a typical mainshock-aftershock sequence, and is not likely a foreshock. But we cannot forget Japan. You just never know.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:00 AM
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I wouldn't get to excited over that one bouy marker as high tide is around midnight for the 5th of January ... in the Anchorage area its a 24 foot tide ... might be higher with this tsunami warning.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:01 AM
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I am right in the safezone behind the island, but am wondering if that is why I all of a sudden felt a tad dizzy...

Scary with so many friends from here that work up north though, and all the tug boat guys etc...



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:04 AM
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Found a webcam in Sitka, Alaska, which is mentioned in the tsunami warning, looks pretty calm
live webcams



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:06 AM
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its been downgraded to a 7.5

but still a large quake none the less..


MAG UTC DATE-TIME y/m/d h:m:s LAT deg LON deg DEPTH km Region MAP 4.5 2013/01/05 09:32:08 55.102 -134.634 9.2 SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA MAP 4.7 2013/01/05 09:27:20 55.541 -135.252 9.9 OFF THE COAST OF SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA MAP 7.5 2013/01/05 08:58:16 55.238 -134.777 9.9 SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA



earthquake.usgs.gov...
edit on 5/1/13 by alysha.angel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:16 AM
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Large but not really major, thank goodness... Even though it was a very shallow quake I doubt that it would generate a tsunami of any great size. Just doesn't have the energy to do that, really. The mag 7.7 Sth of Masset (BC) back on Oct 28 last year (depth 20 km) didn't cause much of a tsunami either and it wasn't very far south of this one.

However it could still be problematic in some of the more local regions they have mapped. As for Hawaii I'd say you have nothing to worry about if you live there, folks.

reply to post by TrueAmerican
 

Hi TA. I'd agree that it's looking like a more typical mainshock/aftershock sequence. We have to hope so, anyway.

If it is a typical one, then we can expect a whole bunch of smaller events there in the coming days. TA knows this but I'm mentioning it for when people say "OMG look at all the aftershocks... Is that normal?" Yes, it is normal with such a shallow event of this size, and we can expect one or two even in the mag 6 range.

If we don't see dozens of aftershocks in the coming hours and days, that would be a worry.

EDIT: Just for comparison, this is what the quake map looked like on Nov 3, 2012 -- six days after the mag 7.7 event off BC:

There are 89 events on that map, including two in the mag 6 range and nine in the mag 5 range. This is a very typical aftershock sequence for an event like this, and we can expect something similar with today's quake.
edit on 5/1/13 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:27 AM
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Okay...just can't go to bed before chiming in. Yes, it is 2:30 in the morning here, but for some reason I just had to get up and check my quake list.


Wow...hoping this plays nice and is a good little tsunami. I am also hoping the subduction zone plays nice...I don't like it when she groans like that.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:32 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


Another 4.2 aftershock just hit north of the main rupture area, and we need to keep an eye on those, especially if they start heading SOUTH.

EDIT: yeah nice comparison, just saw the map you added. And what is worrying is the stress redistribution that will take place from all these bigger events combined. Cascadia is broadcasting its secrets, and you better believe there is more than one scientist with an eyebrow raised right about now.
edit on Sat Jan 5th 2013 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:36 AM
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reply to post by westcoast
 

Hi Tara,

I know the feeling. I was up till nearly three am (my time) two nights ago and again til 1:30 this morning, half the time just watching the darned quake maps and feeling antsy. (Sceptics may blow their morning coffee out their nose now.
)

This PNW/BC region has been more active in the past few months than it has been in decades. This new quake would be the third-largest in Canadian history, I believe. (Last October's was the second.)

That's a lot of energy being released in a fairly small section of a known fault. Maybe this is a good thing. I don't know. But people should be taking notice of these events because they are just hiccups compared to what that region is capable of down in the CSZ.

What would be ideal is for things to settle down again after these hiccups and be nice and quiet for a few decades.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:41 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 

Yes, the distribution is something to keep an eye on. With the 7.7 Mw event from October, virtually all the aftershocks were contained within a fairly well defined region, with just that one in the northern section of the Juan De Fuca plate being anomalous. (But that might have been an independent event anyway.)

But it's true: any time there is a highly significant event in this region, the scientists at the PNSN and other places will be watching it all very closely. Not because they expect a ~mag 9 "big one", but because simply don't know what sequence of events occurred before the last one in 1700.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:42 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


It is very exciting watching you all talk real-time about these events. Knowing they are both possibly dangerous, but everything is alright at the moment makes it thrilling. If I ever had to be stuck with a group of people, it would sure be you guys! Basically, I admire watching your knowledge kind of unfold with the events. Keeps me on the edge of my seat, and teaches me new things at the same time!




posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:44 AM
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Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by westcoast
 

Hi Tara,

I know the feeling. I was up till nearly three am (my time) two nights ago and again til 1:30 this morning, half the time just watching the darned quake maps and feeling antsy. (Sceptics may blow their morning coffee out their nose now.
)

This PNW/BC region has been more active in the past few months than it has been in decades. This new quake would be the third-largest in Canadian history, I believe. (Last October's was the second.)

That's a lot of energy being released in a fairly small section of a known fault. Maybe this is a good thing. I don't know. But people should be taking notice of these events because they are just hiccups compared to what that region is capable of down in the CSZ.

What would be ideal is for things to settle down again after these hiccups and be nice and quiet for a few decades.


Mike i for one believe you , iv felt for the past week or so that a large quake was due somewhere ... and bam it happened ...

i just kept it to my self.. ( sorry )



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:52 AM
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What in the world is going on with this heliplot near Orlando? Did it pick up the 7.5,or are we looking at interference/just going wacko?

earthquake.usgs.gov...

lol, never mind. I just looked at the LISS and saw the same thing everywhere, so I answered my own question.

Don't mind me, I'm still groggy from waking up. Need more coffeeeee.
edit on 1/5/2013 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:05 AM
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so is CA coast safe ?



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:23 AM
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Originally posted by LightningStrikesHere
so is CA coast safe ?


That depends on who you talk to, when speaking for the near future.


Anyway, the minute this quake happened, I checked for potential triggering at our big volcanic beasts, YS and LV. No action, so it appears that all is well for now.


But I do know this much: if Cascadia goes and all hell breaks loose on the west coast, NO ONE will be able to say they didn't know it was coming. Cascadia has been warning us for years with big quakes up and down its length, and combined with all the other evidence, the time is ripe.

Yeah the west coast is safe...haha
edit on Sat Jan 5th 2013 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)





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