Is It Time To Think About Homeschooling?

page: 3
8
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join

posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by frazzle
I don't think sex education has any place in school, but then the same goes for religion in my book.

I'm happy to say that my son's school does not have Religious Education, they have Philosophy & applied ethics which discusses the various beliefs around the world without teaching it as anything factual, more so a discussion about what is the best way for society to interact with each other to survive.
edit on 5-1-2013 by grainofsand because: Grammar




posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by AngryCymraeg
There is a severe problem with homeschooling. Andy Schlafly (he of the pile of drivel that is Conservapedia) recommends it, which is why I could recommend against it. Besides, my wife's taught in both the USA and the UK and she's a brilliant teacher, so go to school!


What is the severe problem?

Not to degrade teachers or your wife, but with technology why do we need a person to regurgitate "facts" as you call them? I can see basics, like reading and math, but do kids really need to sit in class all day so somebody can speak aelective facts to them?



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:15 PM
link   
reply to post by sconner755
 



do kids really need to sit in class all day so somebody can speak aelective facts to them?


Maybe the "sitting" lessons are more about obedience and submission to authority?



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:48 PM
link   
reply to post by frazzle
 





for getting shot, the odds of that are so long


If you haven't noticed the odds are in decline and aren't even close to what they were when I was going to public school. So screw that, even tho the odds do remain high per volume. As those in Sandy Hook found out. It only takes once to leave your child at the very least, emotionally scarred for life. I can't believe any parent would send there child back there. I think it's nuts. And if I had my way no child would ever show up to another public school in America starting Monday. If the odds of them being shot in school aren't ((((((0)))))) Why send them ? As far as religion being taught that's a different thing from teaching creation and as of now I don't give a crap what they teach any ones kid. The child under my roof will never attend public school ever again. Done !
edit on 5-1-2013 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 04:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by sconner755
Not to degrade teachers or your wife, but with technology why do we need a person to regurgitate "facts" as you call them? I can see basics, like reading and math, but do kids really need to sit in class all day so somebody can speak aelective facts to them?


Many parents just don't have the time to homeschool their children. Reading, writing, finding out more about the world outside.... where do I even start? My wife takes hours to plan out lessons over a week, giving her kids as much information as possible. Without carefully planned out lessons all you're doing is throwing facts and figures at your child and hoping that some of them stick. Last term she organised a talk by a Hindu teacher about Hinduism and then she organised a trip to Synagogue. At her last school she organised a trip to a farm. Can many parents organise that? It's nothing to do with selective facts. It's all to with education and learning.
edit on 5-1-2013 by AngryCymraeg because: Typo



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:08 PM
link   
reply to post by randyvs
 


Everyone who chooses to home school or to find an alternate means of educating their children has reasons and I won't fault any of them for it.

But just when you think you've got a grasp on how deep the rabbit hole goes, some other piece of information comes along and blows your socks off all over again.


As fantastic as it seems, the entire history of the education restructuring effort is carefully and thoroughly documented in a book called The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America. The book was written by Charlotte Thomson Iserbyt, a former official at the Department of Education in the Reagan Administration. While there in 1981 - 1982, Charlotte found the "mother lode" hidden away at the Department. In short, she found all of the education establishment's plans for restructuring America's classrooms. Not only did she find the plans for what they intended to do, she discovered how they were going to do it and most importantly why. Since uncovering this monstrous plan, Charlotte Iserbyt has dedicated her life to getting that information into the hands of parents, politicians and the news media

Iserbyt's work details how the process to restructure America's education system began at the beginning of the Twentieth Century and slowly picked up speed over the decades. The new system used psychology-based curriculum to slowly change the attitudes, values and beliefs of the students.

www.newswithviews.com...

Hmmm, the beginning of the twentieth century ... that would be about the same time they began to change the people's attitudes, values and beliefs about money. What a coincidence.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by frazzle

Iserbyt's work details how the process to restructure America's education system began at the beginning of the Twentieth Century and slowly picked up speed over the decades. The new system used psychology-based curriculum to slowly change the attitudes, values and beliefs of the students.

www.newswithviews.com...


Hmmm, the beginning of the twentieth century ... that would be about the same time they began to change the people's attitudes, values and beliefs about money. What a coincidence.

I've seen nothing to draw me towards an environment where I would consider denying my son the benefits of state education and my considered discussions about said instruction between that in the evenings. If you see such benefits then I am interested in reading about them.
edit on 5-1-2013 by grainofsand because: Messed up quote tags



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 07:22 PM
link   
Star and a flag and a well deserved bump.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 07:44 PM
link   
reply to post by grainofsand
 



I've seen nothing to draw me towards an environment where I would consider denying my son the benefits of state education and my considered discussions about said instruction between that in the evenings. If you see such benefits then I am interested in reading about them.


Are you asking if I see any benefits of state-run institutions?

Thinking ~ thinking ~ thinking

Ugh, nope can't say that I do, other than it seems to make you happy and I'm sure it makes many other parents happy, too, for one reason or another. As I said before, I'm glad your son is having a positive experience with it but again, education isn't a one size fits all stocking cap.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 03:31 AM
link   
Not yet, I think homeschooling should be an option as it is to this day.

Separating kids from other kids, not spending that quality time to progress there socializing skill is not good.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 03:50 AM
link   
reply to post by Advantage
 


of topic
Then when the middle daughter had her liver transplant, it was the only way to keep her education continuous.

hope she is doing good health wise

on topic

my eldest keeps asking to be home schooled and im starting to think maybe he is being bullied

what do you think am i just jumping the gun as usual



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 10:09 AM
link   

Originally posted by maryhinge
my eldest keeps asking to be home schooled and im starting to think maybe he is being bullied

what do you think am i just jumping the gun as usual

I'm fortunate to have a very strong communicative relationship with my son where we discuss and consolidate his experiences of state education each evening. This provides the best of both worlds with my input enhancing the instruction he receives from his school.
The openness of our relationship means I do not worry if he is being bullied as he is confident enough to share such information with me if that was the case.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 10:49 AM
link   

Originally posted by JonPrice
Not yet, I think homeschooling should be an option as it is to this day.

Separating kids from other kids, not spending that quality time to progress there socializing skill is not good.


That's another myth, although its the one most people accept as a reason not to home school.

According to Home Schooling and the Question of Socialization by Richard G. Medlin and other researchers, "the irony of the socialization issue in homeschooling that we have known for years, which is that traditional schools are actually more on a path of de-socialization. In traditional schools students learn to stay in a class to which they've been assigned and are grouped according to age and academic level, and generally with students from the same geographic area and socio-economic background."

"Home-schooled children are taking part in the daily routines of their communities. They are certainly not isolated; in fact, they associate with--and feel close to--all sorts of people."

www.homeschool.com...

Obviously this kind of social interaction doesn't come without some effort on the parent's part, but it puts them in charge of the people and situations their children will be exposed to.

Teachers all over the world are committed to "keeping order" in the classroom, not with allowing socialization to occur, so just because your kids are in the proximity of other students doesn't mean that he/she even wants to socialize with them, only that its important to be ACCEPTED as part of the herd they are penned up with for so many hours of the day. Its unfortunate, but too often children in that environment will act in ways that they know are wrong simply to be accepted by those they've been thrown in with by the luck of the draw.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 11:06 AM
link   

Originally posted by maryhinge
reply to post by Advantage
 


my eldest keeps asking to be home schooled and im starting to think maybe he is being bullied

what do you think am i just jumping the gun as usual


JMO, but I'd probably get him into a neutral, non threatening situation like a walk in the park or a lunch just for two (him and me) at a comfortable restaurant and try to draw him out a little more. Not necessarily to find out why he wants to be home schooled, but why he's not satisfied with his current circumstances. It wouldn't hurt to do a little studying on home schooling and cyber learning programs prior to that little chat, since its what he's been asking you to do for him.



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 03:09 AM
link   

Originally posted by frazzle

Originally posted by maryhinge
reply to post by Advantage
 


my eldest keeps asking to be home schooled and im starting to think maybe he is being bullied

what do you think am i just jumping the gun as usual


JMO, but I'd probably get him into a neutral, non threatening situation like a walk in the park or a lunch just for two (him and me) at a comfortable restaurant and try to draw him out a little more. Not necessarily to find out why he wants to be home schooled, but why he's not satisfied with his current circumstances. It wouldn't hurt to do a little studying on home schooling and cyber learning programs prior to that little chat, since its what he's been asking you to do for him.


ill give that a try thanks
the walk in the park and the meal
you see im a bit over protective

on a good note he went to school this morning with a smile on his face



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 11:12 AM
link   
Hurry up, you'll miss the bus.

Thought I'd give the pro public schoolers some more ammo.


Why Public Schooling Is "Better" Than Homeschooling.

Most parents were educated in the underfunded public school system, and so are not smart enough to homeschool their own children.

Children who receive one-on-one homeschooling will learn more than others, giving them an unfair advantage in the marketplace. This is undemocratic.

How can children learn to defend themselves unless they have to fight off bullies on a daily basis?
Ridicule from other children is important to the socialization process.

Children in public schools can get more practice "Just Saying No" to drugs, cigarettes and alcohol.

Fluorescent lighting may have significant health benefits.

Publicly asking permission to go to the bathroom teaches young people their place in society.

The fashion industry depends upon the peer pressure that only public schools can generate.

Public schools foster cultural literacy, passing on important traditions like the singing of "Jingle Bells, Batman smells, Robin laid an egg..."

Homeschooled children may not learn important office career skills, like how to sit still for six hours straight. ~Author Unknown

www.knowledgehouse.info...

Besides, without public schools, we would have no technology. Edison would never have invented electricity, the Egyptians wouldn't have known how to build the pyramids, and the cavemen would never have discovered fire!



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 11:21 AM
link   
Many wants to do Homeschooling to instil religious indoctrination that is lacking in current public schools.

I think Home schooling should only be done if the parent is fit for such tasks, which includes sacrificing their time and social life.

There can't be "Meh go play some games today, i need to hand with my friends" scenario... they need to set a schedule themselves and should be able to understand what they are teaching.

You want to create minds that are fit for society and understand things logically.. not magically.

Like an ATS member(forgot the name) said... "Nothing says hire me like a diploma from Disney land"



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 11:40 AM
link   

Originally posted by luciddream
Many wants to do Homeschooling to instil religious indoctrination that is lacking in current public schools.

I think Home schooling should only be done if the parent is fit for such tasks, which includes sacrificing their time and social life.

There can't be "Meh go play some games today, i need to hand with my friends" scenario... they need to set a schedule themselves and should be able to understand what they are teaching.

You want to create minds that are fit for society and understand things logically.. not magically.

Like an ATS member(forgot the name) said... "Nothing says hire me like a diploma from Disney land"


School shouldn't be about religious indoctrination anyway or, for that matter, any other kind of indoctrination, so why don't we get back to basics and ask why people don't worry about whether or not they're fit to be parents before having children? Why do people believe government is there to raise their children and provide for all of their needs when its obvious the government is not capable or even interested in doing that?

And who determines who is "fit" to teach a child? Yep, the government. Its no wonder they treat us like irresponsible children when they teach nothing so well as irresponsibility and dependence.



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 11:51 AM
link   
reply to post by frazzle
 


The government goes with basic guidelines that would fit most the students, and it teaches them to accommodate in today society. That's all it does, there is no cherry on top. Some parents send them to tutor and extracurricular activities.

But if you want your son or daughter to work in a established that follow government standards, then you better have employees that are trained following that.

Here in Canada, our school boards have had no problems with it.. i grew up in public schools, got my B.Sc, now i'm trying for my Masters...(if time and money permitting).

I think, if someone wants to home school, it should be from age 5 to like 10. After that, a public education, environment(imo, Canada) is necessary.



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 12:10 PM
link   
reply to post by luciddream
 



The government goes with basic guidelines that would fit most the students, and it teaches them to accommodate in today society.


That's my point, its about indoctrination, not independent thinking. Its about a student's ability to regurgitate facts that may or not even be correct in order to accomodate the system's guidelines. And how is that working out for society?

I'm not familiar with Canada's school system, but here in the states:


In 1991, we found 231 un­de­tect­ed factual errors in six high school U.S. History books after the state approval process certified them error-free. When this year's process ended, we found 249 still-un­cor­rec­ted factual errors in four books – more mis­takes over­looked in fewer texts. This despite publish­ers' claims to have beefed up their fact-check­ing, despite Texas Education Agen­cy emphasis on verifying accuracy to the State Textbook Review Panel, and despite an $80,000 Texas Tech review team backing them up.


www.textbookreviews.org...





new topics
 
8
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join