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Water has memory? Quick clip

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posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 06:43 PM
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I found this to be quite interesting, but needs more sources.





posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by MrRottenTreats
 


Very slick video production but this is totally BS.

The "experiment" was very poorly designed and had too many undefined sources of error and is NOT repeatable under stricter scientific constraints.

This slick YouTube video would make it appear that this is true real science but it isn't.

It is a vain attempt by the practitioners of Homeopathy to support their franchise against mounting scientific evidence that Homeopathy is nothing but a scam.

A brief search in the terms "Water" and "Memory" at ATS will reveal that this topic has been investigated several times in the past. Please review some of those threads.

edit on 4/1/2013 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 07:09 PM
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edit on 4-1-2013 by MrRottenTreats because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 



It is a vain attempt by the practitioners of Homeopathy to support their franchise against mounting scientific evidence that Homeopathy is nothing but a scam.


Actually, this is homeopathy:


Homeopathy is a system of medicine which involves treating the individual with highly diluted substances, given mainly in tablet form, with the aim of triggering the body’s natural system of healing. Based on their specific symptoms, a homeopath will match the most appropriate medicine to each patient.


The OP posted a video about water retaining information.

Not homeopathy.
edit on 4-1-2013 by LewsTherinThelamon because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 07:54 PM
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Originally posted by LewsTherinThelamon
reply to post by chr0naut
 



It is a vain attempt by the practitioners of Homeopathy to support their franchise against mounting scientific evidence that Homeopathy is nothing but a scam.


Actually, this is homeopathy:


Homeopathy is a system of medicine which involves treating the individual with highly diluted substances, given mainly in tablet form, with the aim of triggering the body’s natural system of healing. Based on their specific symptoms, a homeopath will match the most appropriate medicine to each patient.


The OP posted a video about water retaining information.

Not homeopathy.
edit on 4-1-2013 by LewsTherinThelamon because: (no reason given)


If water could contain complex 'memory' of things it could come into contact with, then this would support claims about the effectiveness of Homeopathic 'remedies' at the extreme dilutions required.

Most Homeopathic remedies have their 'active ingredients' so diluted that NO molecules still exist in their 'remedies'. To explain, then, how the remedies could actually work, some Homeopathic spin-doctor invented the idea that water (and other molecules) had some sort of 'memory' of the diluted out chemical. This YouTube video uses all the same terminology to describe the same concept. Didn't you notice how the video looks and sounds just like an advertisement? (That's because it is).


edit on 4/1/2013 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 07:59 PM
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I got up to the flower in the water...

What is the chemical make-up of this water? Is it 100% pure? No impurities what-so-ever? No impurities on the slide? Nothing on the flower? Just 100% pure "flower"?

There would be billions of chemicals and particles and what-nots all over that flower that would be skewing the already silly test.

Looks cool though!



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by Qumulys
I got up to the flower in the water...

What is the chemical make-up of this water? Is it 100% pure? No impurities what-so-ever? No impurities on the slide? Nothing on the flower? Just 100% pure "flower"?

There would be billions of chemicals and particles and what-nots all over that flower that would be skewing the already silly test.

Looks cool though!


It was not actually water, it was Brawndo.

Brawndo has what plants crave.

It's got electrolytes!



edit on 4/1/2013 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 


Had to look up Brawndo!




it's like shaving your chest with a lawnmower! that sounds dangerous, but it's not more dangerous than drinking BRAWNDO because drinking BRAWNDO is like riding a pony, which probably sounds not dangerous except that the pony is 300 feet tall and covered in chainsaws! and to get on the pony, you have to take an elevator filled with 16 live cougars, which is an actual sport in latin america, which is extremely fun, but not as fun as BRAWNDO because BRAWNDO is like driving an ice cream truck full of angry bees through a petting zoo, which is a great way of becoming popular if you want to become popular with LAW ENFORCEMENT but if you don't, you should still drink BRAWNDO because BRAWNDO will make you use your fists for everyday tasks, like watching tv or romance or helicopter maintainence! it will also make you more awesome at english, which means you can use apostrophes whenever 'you w'an't to', even in words like 'nuclear', which don't even have an apostrophe yet!


Sounds like some serious beverage! Party on Garth!


edit: NOW you put up the video! I had to search on google and everything!
edit on 4-1-2013 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 09:05 PM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 


I've seen the video before, I didn't realize the connection between homeopathic claims and the "research" done in the video. I thought they were unrelated.



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 10:46 PM
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Actually, there is a division of opinions. So, there may be something to do this.
www.newscientist.com...


He points out that the two thermoluminescence peaks Rey observed occur around the temperatures where ice is known to undergo transitions between different phases. He suggests that tiny amounts of impurities in the samples, perhaps due to inefficient mixing, could be getting concentrated at the boundaries between different phases in the ice and causing the changes in thermoluminescence.

But thermoluminescence expert Raphael Visocekas from the Denis Diderot University of Paris, who watched Rey carry out some of his experiments, says he is convinced. "The experiments showed a very nice reproducibility," he told New Scientist. "It is trustworthy physics." He see no reason why patterns of hydrogen bonds in the liquid samples should not survive freezing and affect the molecular arrangement of the ice.

After his own experience, Benveniste advises caution. "This is interesting work, but Rey's experiments were not blinded and although he says the work is reproducible, he doesn't say how many experiments he did," he says. "As I know to my cost, this is such a controversial field, it is mandatory to be as foolproof as possible."



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 04:32 AM
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Ermmmmm...I call BS. Water doesn't remember me, it doesn't call, text or send me birthday cards!





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