It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

If he was not a LT. Colonel would he be a pilot still???

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 01:57 PM
link   
If the amputee pilot that got reinstated was not a Lt. Colonel would he have been reinstated. Now wait I know that a diver in WW2 who in fact was working against 2 threats against reinstatment got reinstated despite being black an unheard thing in the master navy diver ranks, but we was injured but a line that broke free during a nuke recovery mission, and then went on to request the damaged limb be removed as doctors told him he would never be able to use the limb correctly again......but the effort was long faught and almost failed......and yes this very person was reinstated but being a diver doesnt require the type of speed and acuracy required in fighters. OOOOOHHHHHH and before I forget part of his plea was a prop plain fighter pilot who was an amputee also got reinstated to flight status in WW1........granted a pilot all the same, but the jets of today are far more demanding so again.......If he was not a LT. Colonel whould it have happened????

[edit on 26/10/2004 by drbryankkruta]




posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 02:29 PM
link   
I think the 'prop plane fighter pilot' you may be thinking about was Douglas Badder, who lost both legs in a flying accident in the 1930's. On the outbreak of war he re joined the RAF and became a fighter ace, flying Spitfires and Hurricans, even though he had false legs.

He was shot down and captured by the Germans, but made so many escape attempts that he was eventually sent to Colditz.

Getting back to your question......have you ever heard the phrase "Rank has its privilages"???. My guess is that in a time where the armed forces are being encouraged to be more 'politically correct' that they saw this case as a good PR measure. So being a fairly high ranking officer probably helped.



posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 02:43 PM
link   

Originally posted by BillyTheCat
I think the 'prop plane fighter pilot' you may be thinking about was Douglas Badder, who lost both legs in a flying accident in the 1930's. On the outbreak of war he re joined the RAF and became a fighter ace, flying Spitfires and Hurricans, even though he had false legs.

He was shot down and captured by the Germans, but made so many escape attempts that he was eventually sent to Colditz.

Getting back to your question......have you ever heard the phrase "Rank has its privilages"???. My guess is that in a time where the armed forces are being encouraged to be more 'politically correct' that they saw this case as a good PR measure. So being a fairly high ranking officer probably helped.



I thought it was a white guy with one leg missing who flew a plane that sorta looked like a P-51 ranted not WW1 issue but it wasn't a biplane or anything with dual wings.

And rank has it's privalages is my point exactly.......Hold on The Colonel is about to speak on CNN Headline News right now.

As to the comparison with old prop fighters and the LT Colonel's air caraft the G's are heavier , speeds faster and the combat more intense. I just think its very risky....... Handicapped people should be consired capable people and I have always thought that but at some point the risks dont
make it right.



posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 02:49 PM
link   
There was a film made that covered Douglas Badders exploits called "Reach for the Sky".

Well worth a viewing!



posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 02:50 PM
link   
UPDATE

First CNN Headline News needs to do a retraction not more than 2 minutes ago they said that never in the history of the military has a amputee pilot returned to active duty....this is totally wrong at least 3 countries have placed pilot back in the air......

Second nothing to report on the Colonel's statement other than he is an example of determination and mental wear withall that I respect in any man. This does not negate however the risks are greatly increase in the modern jet and the fact that the rudder is partially controlled by a computer which assists the leg what happens if the device fails and this pilot looses rudder control, are the parents and family going to end up sueing the leg makers and air force or what????



posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 02:52 PM
link   

Originally posted by BillyTheCat
There was a film made that covered Douglas Badders exploits called "Reach for the Sky".

Well worth a viewing!


I would be glad to , but is the person I referenced as the direct influence to the Navy Master Driver to fight for his career cause if I'm wrong there I would like to know.



posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 02:53 PM
link   
They made a film about the Master Diver as well... Carl Burshier or something like that, the movie was called Men of Honor. Loved it



posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 03:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by deeprivergal
They made a film about the Master Diver as well... Carl Burshier or something like that, the movie was called Men of Honor. Loved it



Yes thats what Im taking this information from the divers story I just couldnt remeber the name of the movie thanks for the help.



posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 03:06 PM
link   
OK to try to compare this thread with my own experiences I will have to take you back to the late 1970's and early 1980's

Sir Stuart Pringle was the Major General Royal Marines (Commandos) in the late 1970's. Sadly for him the IRA placed an IED on his car, which detonated when he entered the vehicle one morning. From what I can remember he lost both his legs in the explosion.

However, Pringle made a remarkable recovery and remained the MGRM.

Jump forward to 1982 and the Falklands war (yes it was a war!). whilst out on a recce patrol near Mount Harriet a young Royal Marine triggered a mine, losing his right foot and ankle. I won't go into the full story, but on return to the UK he was discharged from the Corps against his will!.

In desperation he wrote to Pringle asking him to fight his case with the Admiralty. Pringle replied and told him that there was no place in the Royal Marine Commandos for a Marine with one foot!

As I have said......Rank has its privilages!



posted on Oct, 26 2004 @ 03:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by BillyTheCat
OK to try to compare this thread with my own experiences I will have to take you back to the late 1970's and early 1980's

Sir Stuart Pringle was the Major General Royal Marines (Commandos) in the late 1970's. Sadly for him the IRA placed an IED on his car, which detonated when he entered the vehicle one morning. From what I can remember he lost both his legs in the explosion.

However, Pringle made a remarkable recovery and remained the MGRM.

Jump forward to 1982 and the Falklands war (yes it was a war!). whilst out on a recce patrol near Mount Harriet a young Royal Marine triggered a mine, losing his right foot and ankle. I won't go into the full story, but on return to the UK he was discharged from the Corps against his will!.

In desperation he wrote to Pringle asking him to fight his case with the Admiralty. Pringle replied and told him that there was no place in the Royal Marine Commandos for a Marine with one foot!

As I have said......Rank has its privilages!




So in principle does this all say we parted views or are we on the same wave length.... The Navy Master Diver had someone, His trainer was a Navy Master Diver highest in rank in the dive program at the time and the high ranking Diver provided the info on the one legged pilot as evidence to justify a review of his request to reinstate.....

But were I'm saying rank has its privalages is that a pilot in todays planes
have a tasking physical demand never put on any pilot from previous times. The Jets are faster more maneuverable and more multitasking...
Yet he faced very little problems getting back in service all he had to do was make himself strongger and test on an aircraft that for all acounts and purposes does not meet the same conditions a fighter does.....He tested on a corgo / transport type vehicle.......a fighter is more taxing than even those air craft yet he is qualified to be a fighter pilot again.



posted on Oct, 27 2004 @ 12:04 AM
link   
I do not think rank has it's priviledges. Afew years ago an Airborne Sgt. with the Golden Knights lost his legs below the knees. After rehab and proving he was fit to jump he was reinstated in the Airborne.

I personally think that the change in the military mindset about this sort of thing is definately a positive. There are a number of lower leg amputees from Iraq that are being reinstated in the military. They might not be able to do the jobs they had in the past, but by reclassifying them they are keeping in a person who wants to be there.

This also helps these people by giving them acceptance in general as well as keeping their pride in themselves alive.



posted on Oct, 27 2004 @ 12:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by tomcat
I do not think rank has it's priviledges. Afew years ago an Airborne Sgt. with the Golden Knights lost his legs below the knees. After rehab and proving he was fit to jump he was reinstated in the Airborne.

I personally think that the change in the military mindset about this sort of thing is definately a positive. There are a number of lower leg amputees from Iraq that are being reinstated in the military. They might not be able to do the jobs they had in the past, but by reclassifying them they are keeping in a person who wants to be there.

This also helps these people by giving them acceptance in general as well as keeping their pride in themselves alive.


I support handicapped people I had issues when I was young and both my legs had to be reconstructed I was told I wouldn't walk and despite the Navy hesitating and telling me to come back since I was trying to get into Desert Storm only 18 months after the sugery, I went on and got into Law Enforcement and made 11 1/2 years retiring early to go back to college. Later bored not doing anything I became a Fire Fighter/Medic and have been for 4 years I also became a Chaplain, Now I'm bored again and at the late in the game I'm going back to Law Enforcement in about a month.

So I know the follies of being handicapped so thats not the point. I just think there are something we shouldnt do and going mach 3 with a roman candle up your arse isn't one .......By the way when I was assigned my MOS
in the Navy I was to be a evac pilot in the SeaHawk and even if I got it wouldnt want to fly jets cause of the outstanding strain on your legs, back , arms , and shoulders it would put me at risk and if I failed physically , those who I was covering on the ground could die. I cant justify my happiness and dreams being more important then those men on the ground.



posted on Oct, 27 2004 @ 12:35 AM
link   
Well more and more amputees are STAYING in the military. Once you train them for a few hundred thousand you want to keep them the best you can. Try to get in as an amputee.....wont happen. When I was staitoned in Germany I was in a car accident and woke up a week later at the hospital in Weisbaden. I hit my head pretty good. It was not so bad that I couldnt speak or anything but I had a hard time with my balance. The Air Force medicaly retired me. I did not have a choice. If it happened today I probably would have been allowed to stay in.

Pilots for example must have 20-20 vision when they start training. By the time an old bird Colonel retires his vision is most likely far worse than that.



posted on Oct, 27 2004 @ 12:38 AM
link   

Originally posted by just_a_pilot
Well more and more amputees are STAYING in the military. Once you train them for a few hundred thousand you want to keep them the best you can. Try to get in as an amputee.....wont happen. When I was staitoned in Germany I was in a car accident and woke up a week later at the hospital in Weisbaden. I hit my head pretty good. It was not so bad that I couldnt speak or anything but I had a hard time with my balance. The Air Force medicaly retired me. I did not have a choice. If it happened today I probably would have been allowed to stay in.

Pilots for example must have 20-20 vision when they start training. By the time an old bird Colonel retires his vision is most likely far worse than that.



All true, but most high brass are assets and are well guarded for their experience thats why they get to be that old and stay active being slight of vision wasnt something that had to be an issue.



posted on Oct, 27 2004 @ 12:59 AM
link   
Well once you hit 06 it takes an act of Congress to demote you, give you the boot etc. Thats why most high ranking officers that get into any bit of trouble retire. After being 'politely asked too'. As for enlisted personel, I don't know to many younger officers who would even question anyone over E-8. E-9 and you get your act of Congress status. Probably the most powerful person in each service is the top enlisted person such as Chief Master Seargent of the Air Force or Command Seargent Major of the Army etc.

One thing I do find a bit ridiculous is that in all the services except the Army you have to be an officer to fly. Just what does four years of drinking at college do to make you a better pilot? Nothing.

I was at a Society of Experimental Test Pilots black tie a while ago. My dad and Chuck Yeager were deep into that conversation. General Yeager's thought is that the guy/gal that cannot fix a doorbell would probably make a better pilot than the person who can fix it. His reasoning was that the person who cannot fix it just pushes the button to make it work. He does not question why it work like an engineer would, he just knows do this and something happens. He doesn't have to question what makes the airplane fly, he just knows how to do it.

Besides, just like the F-16, without a computer it WONT fly. Pilot or no pilot. That plane is probably the most unstable fighter flying ( Wobbley Goblin-117 isnt really a fighter ). The cg on the Falcon is way out of balance which allows it to make such tight turns and pull nine g's.



posted on Oct, 27 2004 @ 01:03 AM
link   
drbryankkruta and just_a_pilot;

I guess we can call ourselves the medicals. I was in a tank collision in the service. Massive skull fracture, titanium plates, x10 operations and numerous pain meds. I tried to go back in in the early nineties but was told plaes in my head disqualified me. I could not understand that reasoning. 64 tons of steel is probably more likely to set off mines than a few pounds of steel in my head.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join